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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2007
The creative team behind the movie version of Amadeus, director Milos Forman and producer Saul Zaentz, return to themes from their biggest success with Goya's Ghosts - and emerge spattered in blood, not glory. They trace the survival skills and elusive morality of Spanish artist Francisco Goya (Stellan Skarsgard) through his relationships with influential subjects: Queen Maria Luisa (Blanco Portillo) and King Carlos IV (Randy Quaid - yes, Randy Quaid); Father Lorenzo (Javier Bardem), an invented leader of the Spanish Inquisition; and Ines Bilbatua (Natalie Portman)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2007
The creative team behind the movie version of Amadeus, director Milos Forman and producer Saul Zaentz, return to themes from their biggest success with Goya's Ghosts - and emerge spattered in blood, not glory. They trace the survival skills and elusive morality of Spanish artist Francisco Goya (Stellan Skarsgard) through his relationships with influential subjects: Queen Maria Luisa (Blanco Portillo) and King Carlos IV (Randy Quaid - yes, Randy Quaid); Father Lorenzo (Javier Bardem), an invented leader of the Spanish Inquisition; and Ines Bilbatua (Natalie Portman)
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE **1/2 Disney gets back to the basics with Home on the Range, where the characters are cute, the tunes are knee-slappers and the gags are almost as big as the West. With Randy Quaid as a yodeling cattle rustler and Roseanne Barr as a cow out to foil him, how could they go wrong? It's a stitch, from the cowboy chorale title tune to Roseanne Barr, voicing the milk cow Maggie, bragging about her udders. ("Yeah, they're real. Stop staring.") This is Disney with a hint of Pixar's comic edge.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 2, 2004
SUN SCORE **1/2 Disney gets back to the basics with Home on the Range, where the characters are cute, the tunes are knee-slappers and the gags are almost as big as the West. With Randy Quaid as a yodeling cattle rustler and Roseanne Barr as a cow out to foil him, how could they go wrong? It's a stitch, from the cowboy chorale title tune to Roseanne Barr, voicing the milk cow Maggie, bragging about her udders. ("Yeah, they're real. Stop staring.") This is Disney with a hint of Pixar's comic edge.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 26, 1996
Just what the world needs: Another bowling movie!Much funnier than "Those Wacky Ten-pins," but not nearly as funny as "Strikes, Spares and Tons o' Fun!," here's the one about the one-handed bowler and the Amish kid and the gal with real big, uh, attitude.Conceived and directed and produced by the same idiots who brought you "Dumb and Dumber," this one is dim and dimmer. No, it's not. I just said that because I thought it was kind of funny. This one is actually not as funny as "Dumb and Dumber," but still, it's pretty funny.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 16, 1998
Here's the thing to remember about "Hard Rain": It's not about a flood.At least that's what the team responsible for this latest bad-weather thriller wants you to believe."
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 3, 1996
"Independence Day" is like a Tom Clancy novel on steroids from outer space.Big, loud, long, cornball, F-18-crammed, indisputably exciting, patriotic as an anthem, it's something for everybody and, most of all, unstoppable.It doesn't really have a plot, only a situation, with which anyone who has watched TV is familiar: World meets invaders, world loses to invaders, world gets invaders. It's 1956's "Earth Vs. the Flying Saucers" on an A-budget of millions, bigger and brighter, and with enough computer-generated effects to make Bill Gates' eyeballs go tilt.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Moose and squirrel are back: bad news for no-goodniks everywhere, great news for laughter-deprived movie audiences. "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle" marks the return, after more than 35 years in reruns, of Frostbite Falls, Minn.'s, most famous residents. Yes, that All-American flying rodent and his dim-witted companion are back in business, once again seeking to foil the evil machinations of the fiendishly fiendish Boris Badenov, his sultry companion, Natasha Fatale, and the relentlessly rotten Fearless Leader.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 5, 1995
Hmm, this must be a first. A good portion of the spring's prestige movies are based on . . . Sean Connery's tattoo.Absurd, but true. Connery, it is famously known, wears a faded blue stencil on a forearm that reads "Scotland Forever," meaning forever until the taxes got too high, which is why he now resides in Marbella, Spain.But as it turns out, two of the biggest pictures of the spring appear to be illustrated versions of "Scotland Forever" -- one the old swashbuckler "Rob Roy," remade with Liam Neeson, and the other set in a slightly more medieval time frame, Mel Gibson's "Braveheart," about the coming of the English to Scotland in the first place.
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By David Zurawik | December 7, 1990
ABC is pulling the plug on "Head of the Class" and replacing it with a new comedy starring Randy Quaid and Jonathan Winters.The last telecast of "Head of the Class" will be Dec. 25, ABC said yesterday. On Jan. 8, it will be replaced by "Davis Rules," a sitcom that stars Quaid as an elementary school teacher promoted to principal against his better judgment. Quaid plays a single parent with three children. Winters plays Quaid's eccentric father."Davis Rules" will air Tuesdays at 8:30 between "Who's the Boss?"
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
Moose and squirrel are back: bad news for no-goodniks everywhere, great news for laughter-deprived movie audiences. "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle" marks the return, after more than 35 years in reruns, of Frostbite Falls, Minn.'s, most famous residents. Yes, that All-American flying rodent and his dim-witted companion are back in business, once again seeking to foil the evil machinations of the fiendishly fiendish Boris Badenov, his sultry companion, Natasha Fatale, and the relentlessly rotten Fearless Leader.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 16, 1998
Here's the thing to remember about "Hard Rain": It's not about a flood.At least that's what the team responsible for this latest bad-weather thriller wants you to believe."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 26, 1996
Just what the world needs: Another bowling movie!Much funnier than "Those Wacky Ten-pins," but not nearly as funny as "Strikes, Spares and Tons o' Fun!," here's the one about the one-handed bowler and the Amish kid and the gal with real big, uh, attitude.Conceived and directed and produced by the same idiots who brought you "Dumb and Dumber," this one is dim and dimmer. No, it's not. I just said that because I thought it was kind of funny. This one is actually not as funny as "Dumb and Dumber," but still, it's pretty funny.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 3, 1996
"Independence Day" is like a Tom Clancy novel on steroids from outer space.Big, loud, long, cornball, F-18-crammed, indisputably exciting, patriotic as an anthem, it's something for everybody and, most of all, unstoppable.It doesn't really have a plot, only a situation, with which anyone who has watched TV is familiar: World meets invaders, world loses to invaders, world gets invaders. It's 1956's "Earth Vs. the Flying Saucers" on an A-budget of millions, bigger and brighter, and with enough computer-generated effects to make Bill Gates' eyeballs go tilt.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 5, 1995
Hmm, this must be a first. A good portion of the spring's prestige movies are based on . . . Sean Connery's tattoo.Absurd, but true. Connery, it is famously known, wears a faded blue stencil on a forearm that reads "Scotland Forever," meaning forever until the taxes got too high, which is why he now resides in Marbella, Spain.But as it turns out, two of the biggest pictures of the spring appear to be illustrated versions of "Scotland Forever" -- one the old swashbuckler "Rob Roy," remade with Liam Neeson, and the other set in a slightly more medieval time frame, Mel Gibson's "Braveheart," about the coming of the English to Scotland in the first place.
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By David Zurawik | March 28, 1991
Henson creatures will be back on television starting next month.ABC announced yesterday that it is adding a new sitcom, "Dinosaurs," to its schedule, starting April 23. One of the executive producers of the series, which is about a family of dinosaurs living in the year 60 million B.C., is Brian Henson, son of Muppet-creator Jim Henson, who died last year.The stars of "Dinosaurs" will be dinosaur "creatures" created in the Henson Productions Creature Shop in London, which has also made the Muppets and the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
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By New York Daily News | January 25, 1991
When coverage of the Super Bowl ends at 10:30 Sunday night, ABC (Channel 13) is hoping football fans will stay tuned for a preview of "Davis Rules," a situation comedy from Carsey/Werner, which also produces "Cosby" and "Roseanne.""Davis Rules" brings together two likable talents, Randy Quaid and Jonathan Winters. The series moves into its regular time slot at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.It's a soft, gentle comedy, featuring Mr. Quaid as Dwight Davis, an unorthodox principal in a suburban Seattle grammar school.
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