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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Deep thought from Michael Phelps: Is random drug testing really random? The Olympian seems to have his doubts. "Feel like my #randomness for drug testing is like the randomness at the security lines at airports...6 times in three weeks?? Really?" he Tweeted this afternoon. "And not saying its bad that they test... But a little excessive IMO... Just wonder if the other athletes out there are getting the "randomness" that I get... " Perhaps he's alluding to personal history.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 7, 2013
What if you're doctor smoked marijuana and then performed surgery on you? Not a comforting thought, but it could happen. That is why two Johns Hopkins doctors and patient safety experts say hospitals should make alcohol and drug tests mandatory for physicians. The doctors shared their views in a commentary published online April 29 in The Journal of the American Medical Association. They say doctors should also be tested if a patient dies suddenly or is unexpectedly injured during surgery.
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 17, 1996
A former Westminster woman who violated probation stemming from 1993 drug convictions got a break in Carroll County Circuit Court yesterday.Diane Linn Wisner, 36, of Woodlawn in Baltimore County, was allowed to remain on probation even though she admitted to Judge Francis M. Arnold that she had violated her probation by using cocaine in November.Ms. Wisner was serving three years' probation after being convicted of possession of and possession with intent to distribute cocaine, possession with intent to use drug paraphernalia and maintaining a common nuisance in July 1993.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Deep thought from Michael Phelps: Is random drug testing really random? The Olympian seems to have his doubts. "Feel like my #randomness for drug testing is like the randomness at the security lines at airports...6 times in three weeks?? Really?" he Tweeted this afternoon. "And not saying its bad that they test... But a little excessive IMO... Just wonder if the other athletes out there are getting the "randomness" that I get... " Perhaps he's alluding to personal history.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | October 5, 1990
Random drug testing of some 15,000 state employees in safety-related or "sensitive" jobs, originally scheduled to begin this week, could be delayed for two months until program administrators receive more training and a legislative oversight committee approves the rules.At a labor-management advisory committee meeting yesterday, the state personnel department agreed not to begin random testing until some 140 "technical representatives" have obtained further training in administering the program, committee members said.
NEWS
By Sun Herald, Gulfport, Miss | September 16, 1991
COULD A congressional bill that has been gathering dust for more than a year have saved five lives that were snuffed out in a grinding New York subway crash last month?Could all the mandatory drug testing in the world have made a difference? Could there be another way of safeguarding the lives of millions of people who use some form of public transportation each day?Perhaps, perhaps and perhaps.Mandatory federal drug and alcohol testing for airline, railroad and trucking employees has been in effect since 1990.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
Baltimore County's decision to begin random drug testing of its 1,581 sworn police officers and about 35 civilian employees handling sensitive law-enforcement duties is a prudent move that follows a region-wide trend.As drugs have become more common in society, so have, regrettably, temptations. A drug-free force is a must, if police departments are to maintain the integrity of law-enforcement work and assure productive narcotics investigations.Baltimore County's decision means every major police department in the area will soon be conducting random tests to detect drug use. Once the county program becomes operative in a few months, three people will be chosen each day for urine tests.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | April 4, 1991
In the wake of basketball star Len Bias' death from a cocaine overdose in 1986, the University of Maryland College Park instituted an optional random testing policy that remains unique among American colleges and universities.In 1988, agreeing to being tested for drugs for one year became an alternative to suspension for students found guilty by a university judicial board of drug use or possession on campus. Since then, all but four of the 60 to 80 students committing drug offenses have opted for such testing.
SPORTS
October 31, 1991
The Philadelphia Eagles have tested all their players and some of their front-office personnel for the AIDS virus, a member of the team's medical staff is quoted as telling The Washington Post in today's editions.Vincent J. Distefano, Philadelphia's team doctor, told the newspaper that the tests were done at the start of training camp and were part of the "routine physicals" given to each player.Distefano said that none of the players or front office people had tested positive for the disease and that everyone tested signed consent forms.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
Many baseball fans will no doubt be disappointed with the nonrevelatory nature of former Sen. George J. Mitchell's report on the use of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs among major-league baseball players. For 20 months of investigation and hundreds of interviews, much of it reads like a five-year compilation of press clippings. The evidence presented against all-star pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte may be new (and damning), but the vast majority of the players named in the voluminous report have been linked to such drug use before.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Ravens offensive line coach Andy Moeller was sentenced to two years of supervised probation after being found guilty of driving while impaired by alcohol and likely will receive further punishment from the NFL. Moeller, 47, is expected to get suspended for at least one game as well as fined, according to a source. An NFL spokesman said Moeller's situation is being reviewed under the personal conduct policy. District Judge Dorothy Wilson ordered Moeller to abstain from alcohol and continue his rehabilitation, which includes two Alcohol Anonymous meetings a week, random drug testing and direct reports to the court every 60 days.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
Many baseball fans will no doubt be disappointed with the nonrevelatory nature of former Sen. George J. Mitchell's report on the use of anabolic steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs among major-league baseball players. For 20 months of investigation and hundreds of interviews, much of it reads like a five-year compilation of press clippings. The evidence presented against all-star pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte may be new (and damning), but the vast majority of the players named in the voluminous report have been linked to such drug use before.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers and Phil Rogers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
CHICAGO - Apparently weary of accusations of widespread steroid abuse, major-league baseball players yesterday dropped their longstanding opposition to random testing for the performance-enhancing drugs. Donald Fehr, executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Association, proposed that testing of major-leaguers could begin next year. The offer was made during ongoing talks to replace the collective bargaining agreement that expired last November. The union's offer stopped short of the extensive testing sought by owners, and negotiations will continue on testing and larger economic issues.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 2, 2002
Now that everyone has feigned shock and surprise at the revelations by Jose Canseco and Ken Caminiti that Major League Baseball is awash in steroid abuse, let's get real. There have been whispers about steroids for years, but baseball was so busy reveling in the Herculean home run feats of its biggest stars that nobody really wanted to rock the boat. Football's dirty little secret had become baseball's salvation, so everyone who wasn't going anabolic just sort of looked the other way. It's kind of reminiscent of the early 1980s, when cocaine became the recreational drug of choice in major-league clubhouses and sparked a criminal investigation that sullied the reputation of several star players.
NEWS
By Nick Gillespie | August 25, 1996
The recent flap over illegal drug use by White House staff members is a powerful illustration of how the war on drugs piety and the war on drugs hypocrisy are inseparably intertwined.Both the Clinton administration and its Republican critics expound an official policy of "zero tolerance" toward drugs while making allowances for their own "experiments" and youthful indiscretions with controlled substances.The controversy arose after Secret Service agents testified before Congress that at least 21 Clinton White House staff members had used drugs -- including marijuana, cocaine or LSD -- within a year before being granted security clearances.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 17, 1996
A former Westminster woman who violated probation stemming from 1993 drug convictions got a break in Carroll County Circuit Court yesterday.Diane Linn Wisner, 36, of Woodlawn in Baltimore County, was allowed to remain on probation even though she admitted to Judge Francis M. Arnold that she had violated her probation by using cocaine in November.Ms. Wisner was serving three years' probation after being convicted of possession of and possession with intent to distribute cocaine, possession with intent to use drug paraphernalia and maintaining a common nuisance in July 1993.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg | December 6, 1990
A Baltimore police officer has resigned from the department and a sergeant with 19 years on the force has been fired after testing positive for cocaine use during random drug testing, according to officials.The two are the first to fall victim to the department's drug-testing program, which was instituted in April and which has so far tested about 1,000 officers.Both of the policemen were assigned to narcotics units at the district level, police said.The officer, who was not identified because no formal charges were lodged, was a six-year member of the force who last served in a drug-enforcement unit in the Southern District, officials said.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- There's no need to tell Lonnie Smith, the Orioles' reserve outfielder and designated-hitter candidate, about stigmas.Eleven years have passed since Smith voluntarily checked himself into a drug rehabilitation clinic, and still nobody seems to be able to get the story straight, he says.Rather than run from his past, though, Smith talks about it, figuring it's the best means to rectify matters."Somehow, there was this perception out there that I had been through drug rehab three times and I had been caught with drugs and arrested," Smith said.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
Karen Hiebler had been working at a Mars supermarket on Holabird Avenue for 10 years when the company asked her to take a random drug test last fall. No problem, she thought.Big problem, she found out. The test came back showing a urine sample chock-full of PCP, something the bakery manager insisted she'd never taken in her life. She was fired that day. But five months later, Ms. Hiebler says, she received the results she had expected: A different lab determined through DNA testing that the sample wasn't hers.
NEWS
By WILEY HALL | June 29, 1995
Kara, who lives in Baltimore County, did not recognize right away that her 16-year-old son was using drugs. He seemed moody. He often was lethargic. He began doing poorly in school. But to Kara, those changes in behavior seemed symptomatic of adolescence rather than drug abuse."Drugs didn't even cross my mind until he started stealing from the house," she said yesterday."First there would be little things -- he would get a Walkman for Christmas and a week later it would be gone," she said.
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