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March 20, 2012
Reporter Matthew Hay Brown took a break from covering military affairs and national security to review the Psychedelic Furs' show at Rams Head on Stage Monday night. Is there anyone having more fun at a Psychedelic Furs show than frontman Richard Butler? His lyrical sophistication and that buzzsaw voice have always given the band's work a certain gravity, but Butler spent so much of their performance in Annapolis on Monday hopping, grinning, beaming that the main impression he conveyed was of a guy having the time of his life.
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Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
For years, Steve Whiteman considered his old band, Kix, a forgotten relic of the '80s hair-metal scene. Even when the quintet began playing one-off reunion shows about a decade ago, the Hagerstown native viewed the gigs as cashing in on nostalgia. The “stupid money” offered, he said, did not hurt either. It took a trip to the Midwest in 2008 to unexpectedly change the singer's mind. The band was in the small town of Pryor Creek, Okla., for the multiday rock 'n' roll festival Rocklahoma, and Whiteman arrived unsure of what to expect.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
There are at least two remarkable things to note in Colin Blunstone's voice. First, of course, is its sound, that light, airy quality - is it breathy, or breathless? - that gave the great Zombies tracks of the mid-1960s an immediate, intimate, confessional feel. Rod Argent's jazz-inflected keyboard playing is distinctive and pleasing. Blunstone's voice is arresting. Second is the fact that it appears to have aged not at all. Live at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis Monday evening, where Blunstone and Argent led the 2013 version of the Zombies through a crowd-pleasing set of hits, covers and a few new songs, Blunstone sounded precisely as he did on records he made nearly half a century ago. In contrast to his contemporaries - say, Paul McCartney or Mick Jagger , both of whom will be passing through the region in the next month - he still sounds about 22. It was that voice, along with the rock drive of a crack band and a catalog that always stood outside of its time, that made the Zombies' sound, however improbably at this late date, fresh in 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
“You can get your hair wet, just stay in the shallow end, please,” said Dave Johnston to his daughter earlier this week from his Boulder, Colo., home. The banjoist and singer of the bluegrass act Yonder Mountain String Band was on dad duty, “trying to squeeze in some pool days before summer is gone.” Johnston, 40, knows tour season - which includes a headlining gig at Rams Head Live on Friday - is approaching. But this is nothing new for him or his bandmates, Adam Aijala (guitar, vocals)
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sometimes, girlfriends just wanna listen to jazz. First lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Sharon Malone, wife of Attorney General Eric Holder, caught Sunday night's first show of contemporary jazz singer Rachelle Ferrell at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis. The women - Malone has been to the Rams Head several times before - were joined by two other women and shared a bottle of white wine while listening to the performance. Zach Price, general manager for Rams Head On Stage, said he was rushing around, making his usual pre-show preparations, when he was told someone wanted to consult him about security for a VIP guest.
FEATURES
August 20, 2007
The Saw Doctors, who combine the sounds of 1960s rock with Ireland traditions and punk rock force, will perform at Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis. Cost is $35; doors open at 8 p.m. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramsheadtavern.com. Kevin Cowherd is on vacation. His column does not appear today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 4, 2009
The Beastie Boys, hip-hop pioneers who have spent more than 20 years fighting for their right to party, will be playing at Baltimore's Rams Head Live on Tuesday. Tickets, priced at $40, go on sale at 4 p.m. today via an Internet link posted on ramsheadlive.com. There is a two-ticket limit. "This is huge," said Mark Mangold, who's in charge of booking for Rams Head. "This is probably the biggest show we've ever had here. We're all big fans, so this is really exciting." Mangold said he and others at Rams Head have known about the concert for days but were "sworn to secrecy" until the official announcement was made Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
A popular Annapolis tavern has announced that it will open a similar business in historic Savage Mill early next month, bringing the first full-scale restaurant-bar to the Savage area.For the past few months, construction crews have been working inside the mill to make way for the Rams Head Tavern, a 270-seat, two-tier restaurant with a full bar.The restaurant will be modeled after the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis, which was established in 1988 and has expanded to include an amphitheater.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Annapolis resident Rudy Kolich sat alone one recent afternoon in the old Rams Head pub a floor below the tavern's new brewery, new restaurant and soon-to-open new amphitheater.Everyone else was upstairs as he reminisced about the days when the tiny basement pub was elbow to elbow with locals gossiping, cheering sports teams and drinking out of the 100 "beer club" mugs that hung from the ceiling."Today you say you're going to meet somebody at Rams Head, and you don't know where to find them," he said, referring to the establishment's expansion over the years.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
A popular Annapolis tavern has announced that it will open a similar business in the historic Savage Mill early next month, bringing the first full-scale restaurant-bar to the Savage area.For the past few months, construction crews have been working inside the mill to make way for the Rams Head Tavern, a 270-seat, two-tier restaurant with a full bar. The restaurant will be modeled after the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis, which was established in 1988 and has expanded into a mega-complex, including an amphitheater.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A glance at Chesapeake Arts Center's upcoming schedule indicates an exciting season beginning in September, with entertainment to attract audiences with diverse tastes in music, theater and star attractions. Chesapeake recently received $20,000 through a community grant from Maryland Live casino, and executive director Belinda Fraley Huesman has big plans to broaden CAC's revitalization. That effort began in earnest in November, when Chesapeake's Studio 194 Theatre in Brooklyn Park hosted Bay Theatre Company's Wine and Words reading of "Love, Loss and What I Wore," drawing an overflow audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Singer and The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
For Tyler Glenn, frontman of the Provo, Utah-based pop-rock quartet Neon Trees, seeing a therapist was a breakthrough in more ways than one. “It was definitely a profound thing,” said Glenn recently on the phone from Minneapolis. “I found that it was OK to have anxiety and it was OK to have some of the feelings that I had about myself.” Glenn used his therapy sessions as a creative muse when he began writing songs for April's “Pop Psychology,” Neon Trees' third album, and the therapy gave him the confidence he needed to publicly come out as gay in “Rolling Stone” earlier this year.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sometimes, girlfriends just wanna listen to jazz. First lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Sharon Malone, wife of Attorney General Eric Holder, caught Sunday night's first show of contemporary jazz singer Rachelle Ferrell at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis. The women - Malone has been to the Rams Head several times before - were joined by two other women and shared a bottle of white wine while listening to the performance. Zach Price, general manager for Rams Head On Stage, said he was rushing around, making his usual pre-show preparations, when he was told someone wanted to consult him about security for a VIP guest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
The first rap record to enthrall Zsuzsanna Ward was "Illmatic" by Nas. Better known as ZZ Ward, the genre-defying singer-songwriter grew up in Oregon, far from the dangerous New York surroundings Nas memorably depicted on his 1994 album. But as all great writing does, it resonated with her. "Even though I was growing up in a completely different place than he was, I still felt this connection to feeling like there was something bigger for you," Ward said on the phone from Los Angeles last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
A celebration 15 years in the making will bring an Annapolis rock group full circle on Friday night. Jimmie's Chicken Shack, the eclectic rock group best known for its singles “Do Right” and “High,” will commemorate the anniversary of its second and most recognizable album, “Bring Your Own Stereo,” by playing the record's 13 tracks in order for the first time ever. For James Davies, the 45-year-old frontman better known as Jimi HaHa, the fact that a Rams Head venue will host the show makes it even more special.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
On Friday night, singer/songwriter Matt Nathanson shared his decades-in-the-making theory with a sold-out crowd at Rams Head Live. “Inside every one of us there is a tiny Whitney Houston. Tonight we exorcise our tiny Whitney Houstons out into the air,” Nathanson said, before leading crowd in a rousing, shortened version of “I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me).” Nathanson entertained fans for just under two hours, singing 19 songs that ranged from newer tunes (“Heart Starts," “Annie's Always Waiting”)
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
How's this for a homecoming: a packed house of hundreds of teenagers - and more than a few parents - shrieking, waving their hands in the air and snapping grainy cell phone photos. That's what local band All Time Low got when they took the stage at Rams Head Live last night. Fresh off a summer stint with the Warped Tour, the four-piece is on the road with Boston-based emo outfit Boys Like Girls. If any local pop punk act is going to break into the mainstream, it'll be All Time Low. "Hands up, Baltimore," lead singer and guitarist Alex Gaskarth said after the group launched into "Dear Maria," a song off their recently released album So Wrong, It's Right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 30, 2003
You probably thought it was a new Al Jarreau cut when you first heard it. A Quiet Storm gem, soothing and groove-luscious, "Love Calls" by newcomer Kem has been all over urban radio, especially along the East Coast, for months. The artist's elastic vocals and slightly nasal scat bring to mind the distinctive style of the pop-jazz star. "I've allowed more of him to slip into me," Kem says, calling from his cell phone inside a Detroit cafe. "Al Jarreau is definitely an influence." But ultimately Kem, who plays Rams Head Tavern next Thursday, has his own style: a mature fusion of gospel, smooth jazz and late-'70s, early-'80s R&B. Kemistry, his debut on Motown, eschews the synthetic, heavily programmed beats and bass lines you typically hear in today's urban and pop markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
On his latest album, July's “Last of the Great Pretenders,” singer Matt Nathanson opens with the lyric, “I'd kill anyone who'd treat you as bad as I do.” With it, the 40-year-old artist announces his eighth full-length record is clearly different than the others. With songs that take place chronologically from mid-summer to New Year's Eve, “Pretenders” feels like a page from Nathanson's personal journal. Through complex lyrics, the album engages emotionally and brings to light Nathanson's grittier, deeper side.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Seeing J. Roddy Walston and the Business in concert always guarantees one thing: You'll leave much sweatier than you arrived. Since arriving in Baltimore from Tennessee in 2004, the quartet's workmanlike reputation has been built on its raucous, give-everything-you-have-and-more live show, where perspiration simply comes with the territory. But J. Roddy Walston and the Business were different from the other Baltimore-bred bands of the time. They weren't the lauded experimentalists of Animal Collective or the cloaked-in-mystery duo of Beach House.
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