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By New York Times News Service | April 29, 2007
RAMADI, Iraq -- Anbar province, long the lawless heartland of the tenacious Sunni Arab resistance, is undergoing a surprising transformation. Violence is ebbing in many areas, shops and schools are reopening, police forces are growing, and the insurgency appears to be in retreat. "Many people are challenging the insurgents," said the governor of Anbar, Maamoon S. Rahid, though he quickly added, "We know we haven't eliminated the threat 100 percent." Many Sunni tribal leaders, once openly hostile to the American presence, have formed a united front with American and Iraqi government forces against al-Qaida in Iraq.
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NEWS
By Anhvinh Doanvo | January 20, 2014
Iraqi insurgents kicked off 2014 with fireworks in Fallujah and Ramadi where Sunni militants - part of an al Qaida group active in Syria, according to news accounts - burned police stations, freed prisoners and occupied mosques. The militants fought under the banner of ISIS, or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. ISIS was originally formed to induce a withdrawal of coalition forces in Iraq, suppress Shiite populations and establish an Islamic state. The group was first known as "Al-Qaeda in Iraq," after pledging allegiance to the terrorist organization in 2004.
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NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES and JULIAN E. BARNES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 6, 2006
RAMADI, Iraq -- The orange-red glow of the tracer rounds burns bright in the dusk, forming a perfect cone over the heads of the Marines and Iraqi soldiers patrolling a dusty walled street. As the rounds ricochet off the walls, the bullets fly like a shower of sparks. One hits the leg of an Iraqi soldier. Just a few feet ahead, an alleyway offers protection from the bullets and a chance to return fire. In the alley, hidden behind a small shrub, lies an artillery shell with two protruding wires - an improvised explosive device waiting for the patrol.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Bombs in two provincial capitals killed more than 50 Iraqi civilians yesterday, underscoring the continuing threat posed by Sunni Muslim insurgents as they try to regain power in former strongholds. Coinciding with military efforts to curb the strength of Shiite militias in Baghdad and southern Iraq, the new attacks also portend the potential hurdles ahead for the Iraqi government as U.S. troop levels decrease through the summer. Iraqi troops will take on more responsibility for holding on to security gains made in the past year, and the challenge will be formidable if both Sunni and Shiite extremists are active.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A day of fighting between U.S. troops and insurgents in the turbulent city of Ramadi left 25 Iraqis dead and 17 wounded, the military said yesterday. Fighting erupted Wednesday afternoon in the predominantly Sunni Muslim city about 60 miles west of Baghdad after a homemade bomb exploded alongside a Marine convoy. Iraqi guerrillas then attacked with small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades, starting a series of clashes that ground on throughout the day. U.S. troops backed by warplanes battled dozens of insurgents.
NEWS
By Anhvinh Doanvo | January 20, 2014
Iraqi insurgents kicked off 2014 with fireworks in Fallujah and Ramadi where Sunni militants - part of an al Qaida group active in Syria, according to news accounts - burned police stations, freed prisoners and occupied mosques. The militants fought under the banner of ISIS, or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. ISIS was originally formed to induce a withdrawal of coalition forces in Iraq, suppress Shiite populations and establish an Islamic state. The group was first known as "Al-Qaeda in Iraq," after pledging allegiance to the terrorist organization in 2004.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 21, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq. - U.S. Marines stepped up operations against insurgents in Ramadi yesterday, part of an effort to clamp down on rebel strongholds as Iraqis tried to determine the shape of their new government. Marines set up checkpoints, began inspecting vehicles and imposed a curfew on Ramadi, capital of the Sunni-dominated Anbar province, where Iraq's insurgents have been most active. A Marine spokesman played down comparisons to the assault on the neighboring town of Fallujah in November, when more than 50 Marines and thousands of insurgents were killed in fighting to expel guerrillas.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman and Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A car bomb killed at least six people in the central Iraqi city of Ramadi yesterday, shattering the calm of an area that in recent months had been considered one of the safest in the country. Ramadi police officials said the bomb exploded near the city's courthouse in the late morning after a suicide bomber drove to the site. There were conflicting reports of the number of dead, but women, children and at least one police officer were said to be among the fatalities. The U.S. military had said four people died, including the bomber.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2007
RAMADI, Iraq -- Several hundred Iraqi soldiers and police conducted a house-to-house search yesterday through the dangerous Ta'meem neighborhood of this western city, while U.S. forces feverishly began building an Iraqi police station in the one-time insurgent stronghold. U.S. and Iraqi commanders said the effort, dubbed Operation Casablanca, is a sign of the growing competency of the Iraqi forces in this provincial capital of Anbar province, the heart of the Sunni insurgency. The Iraqi forces searched apartment buildings and businesses for suspected insurgents.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 28, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two weeks after a U.S.-Iraqi security crackdown was launched, bombers struck popular gathering spots that included an ice cream parlor and a kebab shop yesterday, killing at least eight people. Police in the capital also found the bodies of 31 men who had been shot, apparent victims of Shiite death squads. The U.S. military reported the deaths of five American soldiers. Frustration in Baghdad over the continuing bloodshed was accompanied by a sense of confusion over an afternoon incident in Ramadi, where officials said a bomb at a soccer field killed 18 children.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman and Ann M. Simmons and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A car bomb killed at least six people in the central Iraqi city of Ramadi yesterday, shattering the calm of an area that in recent months had been considered one of the safest in the country. Ramadi police officials said the bomb exploded near the city's courthouse in the late morning after a suicide bomber drove to the site. There were conflicting reports of the number of dead, but women, children and at least one police officer were said to be among the fatalities. The U.S. military had said four people died, including the bomber.
NEWS
By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Efforts to improve security in Anbar province, long the primary stronghold of the Sunni Arab insurgency, suffered a setback yesterday when suicide bombers detonated explosives at a police recruitment center in Fallujah and a police station in Ramadi. At least 20 people were killed and 31 injured, according to police and witnesses. Meanwhile, American military officials announced the deaths of three more U.S. soldiers, two killed Wednesday in a road bombing in Baghdad and one who died of wounds from a road bomb northwest of the capital Tuesday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 2007
RAMADI, Iraq -- Anbar province, long the lawless heartland of the tenacious Sunni Arab resistance, is undergoing a surprising transformation. Violence is ebbing in many areas, shops and schools are reopening, police forces are growing, and the insurgency appears to be in retreat. "Many people are challenging the insurgents," said the governor of Anbar, Maamoon S. Rahid, though he quickly added, "We know we haven't eliminated the threat 100 percent." Many Sunni tribal leaders, once openly hostile to the American presence, have formed a united front with American and Iraqi government forces against al-Qaida in Iraq.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 28, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two weeks after a U.S.-Iraqi security crackdown was launched, bombers struck popular gathering spots that included an ice cream parlor and a kebab shop yesterday, killing at least eight people. Police in the capital also found the bodies of 31 men who had been shot, apparent victims of Shiite death squads. The U.S. military reported the deaths of five American soldiers. Frustration in Baghdad over the continuing bloodshed was accompanied by a sense of confusion over an afternoon incident in Ramadi, where officials said a bomb at a soccer field killed 18 children.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2007
RAMADI, Iraq -- Several hundred Iraqi soldiers and police conducted a house-to-house search yesterday through the dangerous Ta'meem neighborhood of this western city, while U.S. forces feverishly began building an Iraqi police station in the one-time insurgent stronghold. U.S. and Iraqi commanders said the effort, dubbed Operation Casablanca, is a sign of the growing competency of the Iraqi forces in this provincial capital of Anbar province, the heart of the Sunni insurgency. The Iraqi forces searched apartment buildings and businesses for suspected insurgents.
NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES and JULIAN E. BARNES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 6, 2006
RAMADI, Iraq -- The orange-red glow of the tracer rounds burns bright in the dusk, forming a perfect cone over the heads of the Marines and Iraqi soldiers patrolling a dusty walled street. As the rounds ricochet off the walls, the bullets fly like a shower of sparks. One hits the leg of an Iraqi soldier. Just a few feet ahead, an alleyway offers protection from the bullets and a chance to return fire. In the alley, hidden behind a small shrub, lies an artillery shell with two protruding wires - an improvised explosive device waiting for the patrol.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Bombs in two provincial capitals killed more than 50 Iraqi civilians yesterday, underscoring the continuing threat posed by Sunni Muslim insurgents as they try to regain power in former strongholds. Coinciding with military efforts to curb the strength of Shiite militias in Baghdad and southern Iraq, the new attacks also portend the potential hurdles ahead for the Iraqi government as U.S. troop levels decrease through the summer. Iraqi troops will take on more responsibility for holding on to security gains made in the past year, and the challenge will be formidable if both Sunni and Shiite extremists are active.
NEWS
By Garrett Therolf and Garrett Therolf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Efforts to improve security in Anbar province, long the primary stronghold of the Sunni Arab insurgency, suffered a setback yesterday when suicide bombers detonated explosives at a police recruitment center in Fallujah and a police station in Ramadi. At least 20 people were killed and 31 injured, according to police and witnesses. Meanwhile, American military officials announced the deaths of three more U.S. soldiers, two killed Wednesday in a road bombing in Baghdad and one who died of wounds from a road bomb northwest of the capital Tuesday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
RAMADI, Iraq -- The Bradley fighting vehicles moved slowly down this city's main boulevard. Suddenly, a homemade bomb exploded, punching into one vehicle. Then another explosion hit, briefly lifting a second vehicle up onto its side before it dropped back down again. Two American soldiers climbed out of a hatch, the first with his pant leg on fire, and the other completely in flames. The first rolled over to help the other man, but when they touched, the first man also burst into flames.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 21, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq. - U.S. Marines stepped up operations against insurgents in Ramadi yesterday, part of an effort to clamp down on rebel strongholds as Iraqis tried to determine the shape of their new government. Marines set up checkpoints, began inspecting vehicles and imposed a curfew on Ramadi, capital of the Sunni-dominated Anbar province, where Iraq's insurgents have been most active. A Marine spokesman played down comparisons to the assault on the neighboring town of Fallujah in November, when more than 50 Marines and thousands of insurgents were killed in fighting to expel guerrillas.
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