Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRamadan
IN THE NEWS

Ramadan

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 30, 2011
Muslims in Harford County celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan with a prayer ceremony Tuesday morning at the Bel Air Reckord Armory. As more than a billion Muslims worldwide celebrated completion of the month of Ramadan, Harford's Muslims assembled at the armory on Main Street to offer traditional Eid Prayers. The Eid Prayers ceremony is a family event and is attended by men, women and children, explained Dr. Rehan Khan of Masjid Al-Falaah, Harford County's Muslim education center in Abingdon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | July 31, 2014
With very little notice being taken in Harford County, one of the most widely-observed holidays on earth was celebrated this week: Eid ul-Fitr. The movable feast was observed on Tuesday as people of the Islamic faith celebrated the conclusion of the holy month of Ramadan, whose beginning and end each year also are variable. During Ramadan, Muslims fast during the daylight hours, perform works of service and generally renew their faith. For most people in Harford County, the observance of Ramadan and its traditions have been rather mysterious.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
On the Northwest Baltimore office door of Mubasher Ahmad, a Muslim missionary with gentle manners, are words in English and Arabic. They say, "Love for all, hatred for none."Mounted on a wall in the Baltimore County office of Dr. Bashar Pharaon, an amiable surgeon who is president of the Islamic Society of Maryland, is handsomely embroidered Arabic calligraphy. Its translation: "I believe in God."The two men, with an estimated 15,000 other Muslims in the Baltimore metropolitan area, are observing the strict, monthlong fast of Ramadan, share a fervent hope for their sometimes controversial and beleaguered faith.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 23, 2013
Like Passover and Easter, it is a cornerstone religious holiday and a movable feast based on the phases of the moon. Like Passover and Easter, the people who celebrate it identify themselves as the spiritual children of Abraham. The religious observance is Ramadan, which this year began on July 8 and concludes on the evening of Aug. 7. The month-long observance is comparable in length to the 40 days of fasting and penance Christians observe during Lent, but Ramadan, despite the abstinence from food and water observed during the day, is a joyous time for the faithful.
NEWS
By Corey Saylor | January 13, 1998
WE are in the midst of the holiest month for the second-largest religion in America. But you might not know it, because it goes virtually unnoticed by much of the country.Ramadan, which started at the end of December, is the Muslim commemoration of God's first revelation of the holy book, the Koran, to the Prophet Mohammed.Hate crimeThis year the observance was marred when a star and a crescent, symbols of Islam, placed near the White House to recognize Ramadan were defaced on Dec. 26, 1996, with a Nazi swastika.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 4, 1995
CAIRO, Egypt -- Rageb Hassen was ready. His left hand held his spoon aloft, poised at mouth level. His right hand clutched the bowl of beans, preparing to raise it to the same altitude.As soon as a cannon signaled the sun had set, his spoon, bowl and mouth reached a happy convergence, ending Rageb's third day of fasting for Ramadan.The Islamic holy month began this week, starting 28 days of abstinence from food and drink between sunrise and sundown for the world's Muslims."It's not so hard," Mr. Hassen, a 20-year-old clothing vendor, said of the daily fast.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P.L. Somerville | March 10, 1994
An estimated 15,000 Muslims in the Baltimore area are preparing for celebrations Monday that will conclude Ramadan, the monthlong period of fasting and spiritual exercises.One of the local mosques with a schedule of observances Monday morning for men, women and children is Masjid Walter TC Omar at 3401 W. North Ave. The Eid prayer will begin there at 10 a.m. The worship will be followed by the traditional Eidel-Fitr feast, masjid spokesman Emmanuel Karim announced."Eidul-Fitr is the celebration to commemorate the completion of Ramadan and represents a personal victory of one's spirituality over one's physical and worldly desires," Mr. Karim said.
FEATURES
By Frances Grandy Taylor and Frances Grandy Taylor,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2001
Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar used by Muslims, is the most spiritual time in Islam, and this year it arrives at an unsettled time for those in America. The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have focused American attention on Islam as never before. TV talk shows debate the meaning of jihad, and Muslim women who wear traditional garb risk hostile reactions. The hijab, or traditional scarf, has become subjected to curiosity and sometimes hostility.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
Raghid Shourbaji finds it difficult to put into words. There's something about Ramadan that is just different from the rest of the year. "You feel it almost in the air everywhere," said the Clarksville man, a board member of the Howard Council Muslim Council. "Not only among Muslims -- even among non-Muslims. It's a serene and peaceful feeling that you get during this time." With the sighting of the first crescent of the new moon this evening, Muslims in Maryland and around the world will begin the observation of Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and a period of fasting, prayer and good works.
NEWS
November 25, 2001
Western Maryland College's "Taste of Islam" will feature a traditional Ramadan dinner Wednesday. The program will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Englar Dining Hall. Tickets are $15 for non-WMC students, faculty or staff. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis. "First, we will break the fast in the traditional manner by eating a date and drinking water," said Mohamed Esa, a professor of German and adviser of the Multicultural Student Association. During Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 22, 2013
Members of the Harford County Muslim community will celebrate and host for their neighbors of all faiths a traditional Ramadan iftar, or fast-breaking dinner, on Saturday, July 27, at Masjid Al-Falaah in Abingdon. The public is invited to join the local Muslim community for the dinner at the county's Muslim Center off Philadelphia Road. Reservations can be made by calling Dr. Rehan Khan, of Masjid Al-Falaah, at 202-236-7338. "As more than one billion Muslims worldwide celebrate Ramadan by fasting and appreciating the blessings given to us, it is equally important for the American Muslim community to reach out to our neighbors as an example of true Islamic ideals," Kahn said. "We are here to show our friends and neighbors that American Muslims will continue to be contributing members of our society.
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 30, 2011
Muslims in Harford County celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan with a prayer ceremony Tuesday morning at the Bel Air Reckord Armory. As more than a billion Muslims worldwide celebrated completion of the month of Ramadan, Harford's Muslims assembled at the armory on Main Street to offer traditional Eid Prayers. The Eid Prayers ceremony is a family event and is attended by men, women and children, explained Dr. Rehan Khan of Masjid Al-Falaah, Harford County's Muslim education center in Abingdon.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,Los Angeles Times | October 3, 2008
BAGHDAD - Bombs and gunfire ripped through the end of Ramadan here yesterday, killing at least 24 worshipers and Iraqi soldiers near two Shiite mosques in a worrisome reminder that the drop in violence in recent months can be shattered by successive explosions. The blasts struck in the early morning of Eid al-Fitr, the feast that ends the holy month of fasting. Fourteen people, including three soldiers, were killed and 28 injured when a sedan blew up outside a mosque in the Zafaraniya neighborhood of southeastern Baghdad.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
September afternoons on the soccer field at Randallstown High can heat up quickly, and Ousmane Toure tires much more quickly than he usually does. During a break in practice, Toure eagerly pours water over his head and arms to cool off, but he will not drink any. At Oakland Mills, it's heating up, too. Fuad Suleiman, in full pads, goes all-out in hitting drills at football practice. He gradually slows down, eventually taking a knee on the sideline to catch his breath. His buddies tell him to get some water, but he does not. Toure and Suleiman won't drink anything at practice for 30 days as they observe the Ramadan fast.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | September 30, 2007
Mallory Terry, who lives on a Northwest Baltimore block in Upton where half the rowhouses are vacant, wasn't expecting to see a throng of people collecting food and clothing outside the Ul-Haqq mosque when she took her two sons for a walk yesterday. After pausing briefly to ask if the bonanza was open to anyone, she collected apples, water, soda, spaghetti, corn and two bags of clothes, blankets and toiletries. Then she graciously thanked several volunteers. Terry, 23, said she isn't in dire straits, but as a mother of two young sons, she takes all the help she can get. "We need more things like this to help the community," she said, before calling out for her 4-year-old son Josiah to return to her side.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A militia chief's brother, kidnapped last week in an act of vengeance that sparked a two-day battle over control of a southern Iraq city, was found dead yesterday amid signs of simmering unrest between rival Shiite Muslim groups that is undermining security in the relatively stable south. At least 50 other Iraqis were killed or found dead around the country yesterday as part of a relentless wave of political violence that has marked the just-ending Muslim holy month of Ramadan.
FEATURES
By Anne Marie Weiss-Armush and Anne Marie Weiss-Armush,Universal Press Syndicate | February 13, 1994
The new crescent moon on Feb. 10 marked the beginning of the Muslim observance of Ramadan.For a month, Muslims around the world abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex between dawn and sunset. An exercise of empathy and compassion, Ramadan helps people identify with the problems of the less fortunate.Refraining from all foods and liquids, including water, is a challenge to the body. The evening meal after each day of fasting should be filling, without putting a strain on the digestive system.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Ashraf Khalil,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- As the sun slowly descended toward the Pacific Ocean, Amin Momand watched it, and his teammates watched him watching it. It was an October team dinner the night before a Palos Verdes High School football game. But Momand, a starting defensive end for the Sea Kings and a Muslim, couldn't eat - couldn't even sip water - until the sun disappeared, according to the rules of Ramadan. When darkness finally came and he took a drink, there was a communal sigh of relief. Some teammates applauded.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 23, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Gunmen bombed and shot families shopping for food and gifts, executed dozens in sectarian killings and ambushed a group of Iraqi police recruits yesterday during the closing hours of Ramadan. The violence left scores of Iraqis dead and further marred the Muslim holy month, which has been a time of incessant violence against Iraqis and American troops. The military announced yesterday that five U.S. troops had been killed in four combat incidents around Iraq, bringing the number of Americans killed over the weekend to 10. At least 83 U.S. troops were killed in the first 22 days of October, making the month the deadliest for Americans in Iraq since November 2005.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Ashraf Khalil,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- As the sun slowly descended toward the Pacific Ocean, Amin Momand watched it, and his teammates watched him watching it. It was an October team dinner the night before a Palos Verdes High School football game. But Momand, a starting defensive end for the Sea Kings and a Muslim, couldn't eat - couldn't even sip water - until the sun disappeared, according to the rules of Ramadan. When darkness finally came and he took a drink, there was a communal sigh of relief. Some teammates applauded.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.