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January 17, 1999
Ralph Waldo Emerson(1803-1882)Emerson was a main practitioner of New England Transcendentalism. His 96-page book "Nature" helped initiate Transcendentalism.In it he answered the questions to his spiritual doubts. His later writings were, in a sense, annexes of "Nature."In his lecture "The American Scholar" he explained what he believed were the duties of a liberated intellectual. It was in essence a lecture against Harvard intelligentsia, although Emerson himself was a Harvard graduate.-- Encyclopedia of LiteraturePub Date: 01/17/99
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NEWS
August 29, 2012
Paul Jaskunas is to be commended for his critique of the shallow materialism of conservative individualism ("A false self-reliance," Aug. 24). Individual freedom narrowly conceived as egoistic self-interest, insatiable profiteering and idolatrous devotion to the so-called free market leads inexorably to a spiritual desert. It prevents any true flowering of the human personality, which is the essence of individual freedom. The deification of the market is especially dangerous in this era of giant corporations, which are global in scope and deeply authoritarian in character.
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NEWS
December 13, 1998
John Addison, 78, a composer best known for his Oscar- and Emmy-winning scores for movies and television, including the music for the 1963 film "Tom Jones," died of a stroke Monday in Bennington, Vt. He won an Academy Award for "Tom Jones" and was nominated for another for "Sleuth." He won his Emmy for the theme of "Murder, She Wrote."Robert Marasco, 62, a playwright and novelist known for such hair-raising works as "Child's Play," died of lung cancer Dec. 6 in New York. "Child's Play," a melodrama about evil occurrences in a Roman Catholic boys' school.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 16, 2009
I've just come from Cambridge, that beehive of brilliance, where nerds don't feel self-conscious: There's always someone nerdier nearby. If you are the World's Leading Authority on the mating habits of the jabberwock beetle of the Lesser Jujube Archipelago, you can take comfort in knowing that the pinch-faced drone next to you at Starbucks may be the W.L.A. on 17th-century Huguenot hymnody or a niche of quantum physics that is understood by nobody but himself. People in Cambridge learn to be wary of brilliance, having seen geniuses in the throes of deep thought step into potholes and disappear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum | May 25, 2003
Ralph Waldo Emerson's first public appearance in Baltimore was in 1827, when he gave a sermon at the First Unitarian Church at Franklin and Charles streets. He returned many times during the next 50 years, participating in lectures sponsored by the Baltimore Mercantile Library Association and the Peabody Institute. His last lecture at the Peabody, "Re-sources and Inspiration," was attended by poets Walt Whit-man and John Burroughs. This summer, the Johns Hopkins University will commemorate Emerson's Balti-more legacy in an exhibit, "Emerson Lectures in Balti-more," which will showcase some of Emerson's letters and lectures, as well as photographs, woodcuts and lithographs of 19th-century architecture that Emerson admired in Baltimore.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
Paul Jaskunas is to be commended for his critique of the shallow materialism of conservative individualism ("A false self-reliance," Aug. 24). Individual freedom narrowly conceived as egoistic self-interest, insatiable profiteering and idolatrous devotion to the so-called free market leads inexorably to a spiritual desert. It prevents any true flowering of the human personality, which is the essence of individual freedom. The deification of the market is especially dangerous in this era of giant corporations, which are global in scope and deeply authoritarian in character.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
CONCORD, MASS. - As tourist attractions go, the brown, clapboard house on the road to Lexington radiates modesty. The window and door frames sag, making the whole building appear to slump. Inside, the floorboards ripple like waves in a stormy sea, and the plaster is cracked and buckled. Some of the wallpaper is rotting and torn. This is Orchard House, the setting for "Little Women," 19th-century author Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel about young women coming of age in New England - a house that is a shrine to the novel, which has never gone out of fashion, or print, to the woman who wrote it and the flowering of American philosophical thought.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | December 27, 1991
Chuck Noll left pro football yesterday with four Super Bowl rings and a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson.Noll, after 23 years as Pittsburgh Steelers coach, leaves an unmatched legacy of four Super Bowl championships, but his success on the field obscured his many other facets -- he can fly an airplane, pilot a boat, savor a fine wine and quote Emerson.It was typical of Noll that when he was asked at a news conference yesterday about the acrimonious departure of such stars as Terry Bradshaw -- who didn't mention Noll's name when he gave his induction speech at the Pro Football Hall of Fame -- and Franco Harris, he quoted Emerson.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 16, 2009
I've just come from Cambridge, that beehive of brilliance, where nerds don't feel self-conscious: There's always someone nerdier nearby. If you are the World's Leading Authority on the mating habits of the jabberwock beetle of the Lesser Jujube Archipelago, you can take comfort in knowing that the pinch-faced drone next to you at Starbucks may be the W.L.A. on 17th-century Huguenot hymnody or a niche of quantum physics that is understood by nobody but himself. People in Cambridge learn to be wary of brilliance, having seen geniuses in the throes of deep thought step into potholes and disappear.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 24, 2006
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Susan Cheever Simon & Schuster / 240 pages / $26 At a time when it can often seem this country has lost touch with the cultural and social idealism which once undergirded American democracy, Susan Cheever's enthralling new literary history serves to remind us of a time when unbridled intellectual excitement,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum | May 25, 2003
Ralph Waldo Emerson's first public appearance in Baltimore was in 1827, when he gave a sermon at the First Unitarian Church at Franklin and Charles streets. He returned many times during the next 50 years, participating in lectures sponsored by the Baltimore Mercantile Library Association and the Peabody Institute. His last lecture at the Peabody, "Re-sources and Inspiration," was attended by poets Walt Whit-man and John Burroughs. This summer, the Johns Hopkins University will commemorate Emerson's Balti-more legacy in an exhibit, "Emerson Lectures in Balti-more," which will showcase some of Emerson's letters and lectures, as well as photographs, woodcuts and lithographs of 19th-century architecture that Emerson admired in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
CONCORD, MASS. - As tourist attractions go, the brown, clapboard house on the road to Lexington radiates modesty. The window and door frames sag, making the whole building appear to slump. Inside, the floorboards ripple like waves in a stormy sea, and the plaster is cracked and buckled. Some of the wallpaper is rotting and torn. This is Orchard House, the setting for "Little Women," 19th-century author Louisa May Alcott's semi-autobiographical novel about young women coming of age in New England - a house that is a shrine to the novel, which has never gone out of fashion, or print, to the woman who wrote it and the flowering of American philosophical thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1999
Ralph Waldo Emerson(1803-1882)Emerson was a main practitioner of New England Transcendentalism. His 96-page book "Nature" helped initiate Transcendentalism.In it he answered the questions to his spiritual doubts. His later writings were, in a sense, annexes of "Nature."In his lecture "The American Scholar" he explained what he believed were the duties of a liberated intellectual. It was in essence a lecture against Harvard intelligentsia, although Emerson himself was a Harvard graduate.-- Encyclopedia of LiteraturePub Date: 01/17/99
NEWS
December 13, 1998
John Addison, 78, a composer best known for his Oscar- and Emmy-winning scores for movies and television, including the music for the 1963 film "Tom Jones," died of a stroke Monday in Bennington, Vt. He won an Academy Award for "Tom Jones" and was nominated for another for "Sleuth." He won his Emmy for the theme of "Murder, She Wrote."Robert Marasco, 62, a playwright and novelist known for such hair-raising works as "Child's Play," died of lung cancer Dec. 6 in New York. "Child's Play," a melodrama about evil occurrences in a Roman Catholic boys' school.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1995
There was a time when Judy Emerson lived a carefree life. She went to school and worked in her church while planning a career as a Methodist minister.Then her sister, Susan, died of pneumonia at the age of 33 in January of last year, and Judy Emerson became responsible for the welfare of her ailing parents in their Parkville home.While Congress argues the dollars and cents of health care, Ms. Emerson contends with the real-life problems of a mother and father who can't care for themselves and might eventually need substantial government help.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | August 3, 1992
This year is the 100th anniversary of Walt Whitman's death. In his honor I've been re- reading ''Leaves of Grass.''I celebrate myself,And what I assume you shall assume,For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.I loafe and invite my soul,I lean and loafe at my ease . . . observing a spear of summer grass.With those lines, Whitman began the first and longest of the 12 poems which he initially printed and bound himself in July, 1855. Much later he would finally name that first poem ''Song of Myself.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1995
There was a time when Judy Emerson lived a carefree life. She went to school and worked in her church while planning a career as a Methodist minister.Then her sister, Susan, died of pneumonia at the age of 33 in January of last year, and Judy Emerson became responsible for the welfare of her ailing parents in their Parkville home.While Congress argues the dollars and cents of health care, Ms. Emerson contends with the real-life problems of a mother and father who can't care for themselves and might eventually need substantial government help.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | August 3, 1992
This year is the 100th anniversary of Walt Whitman's death. In his honor I've been re- reading ''Leaves of Grass.''I celebrate myself,And what I assume you shall assume,For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.I loafe and invite my soul,I lean and loafe at my ease . . . observing a spear of summer grass.With those lines, Whitman began the first and longest of the 12 poems which he initially printed and bound himself in July, 1855. Much later he would finally name that first poem ''Song of Myself.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | December 27, 1991
Chuck Noll left pro football yesterday with four Super Bowl rings and a quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson.Noll, after 23 years as Pittsburgh Steelers coach, leaves an unmatched legacy of four Super Bowl championships, but his success on the field obscured his many other facets -- he can fly an airplane, pilot a boat, savor a fine wine and quote Emerson.It was typical of Noll that when he was asked at a news conference yesterday about the acrimonious departure of such stars as Terry Bradshaw -- who didn't mention Noll's name when he gave his induction speech at the Pro Football Hall of Fame -- and Franco Harris, he quoted Emerson.
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