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November 11, 1993
Adrienne VittadiniAdrienne Vittadini's strong hand with knits falls right into this season's trends. Her tank tops and T-shirt dresses made a strong showing, proving that current doesn't have to be cheesy. Her clothes have enough substance and weight to be worn by real women who want to be in fashion without letting it all hang out.She's strong on spring stripes and colors and her knit tank dress shown over a body-hugging poor-boy T-shirt is a reality check against the over-exposed models seen elsewhere.
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NEWS
December 26, 2008
Al Meyerhoff, 61 Legal voice for poor Al Meyerhoff, a leading labor, environmental and civil rights lawyer who brought a landmark case to stop sweatshop conditions for 30,000 workers on the Pacific island of Saipan, died n Sunday in Los Angeles, where he lived. He was 61. The cause was complications of leukemia, his wife, Marcia Brandwynne, said. Meyerhoff, a loud, friendly bear of a man with a thick mane of tousled hair, rose to prominence in several legal fields. As a civil rights litigator, he successfully challenged a California law that prevented illegal immigrant children from attending public school.
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FEATURES
December 4, 1991
One apparel notion that has been selling, retail executives said, is the new Ralph Lauren Polo Bear clothing. Instead of his famous polo pony, Lauren has been putting the image of a cuddly bear onto things like T-shirts and dress shirts.Bears can also be found screened onto the back of a jean jacket, handknit on the front of a sweater or embroidered as a jacquard down the front of a tie. There are also stuffed teddy bears, at $450. The Polo/Ralph Lauren store at 72d Street and Madison Avenue in Manhattan sold out its stock of 200 bears over the weekend.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 21, 2008
W hy have shares of Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. done well this year when many competitors haven't? - P.J. via the Internet The name on the company's famous brand of apparel and home decor still means something to shoppers. Sold by Macy's, Dillard's and other retailers and through its own Ralph Lauren, Club Monaco and Rugby stores, its merchandise has a distinctive style that has withstood the test of time. Net income in its fiscal first-quarter, which ended June 28, rose 8 percent thanks to strong international sales, prompting the company to raise full-year sales estimates.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | July 2, 1995
Recall Hollywood in its heyday. Movies were black and white. Dialogue was memorable. And martinis were dry.But, most of all, movie stars looked the part. Glamour, my dear, was de rigueur.Gone forever? Not quite. First, Ralph Lauren revived the high style of 1930s Hollywood in his spring clothing collection. As the theme from "Sunset Boulevard" played, skinny models slinked down the runway in shimmery glitter gowns that would make Harlow proud. The finale was pure show biz -- the last model appeared in a white satin strapless gown clutching a fake Oscar.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
What, exactly, is a lifestyle, and where can you get one?Fifteen years ago, the answer to that question might have been quite different. But that year, 1983, is the year that Ralph Lauren, designer of elegant clothing for men and women, turned his discerning eye to the field of home furnishings.Bath and bed linens, furniture, tableware, beds and chests, sofas and chairs, lamps and accessories soon joined the suits, evening gowns and long tailored coats Lauren was known for.Suddenly it was possible not only to dress yourself in a designer's particular look, it was also possible to dress your house - at retail - in a designer's vision.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Don't hate fashion designer Matt Nye because he's beautiful, or because he's the companion of media maverick Jann Wenner, or because he's traveled through Europe in five-star style with former boss Ralph Lauren. "Yes, good looks, youth, a level of notoriety, can open doors. For whatever reason people may be curious about me," says Nye, 34, while lounging in his Upper West Side studio. "What you choose to do with those opportunities once they're created is up to you. In the end, it's your work that's going to speak louder than who you're with or what you look like."
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | July 2, 1995
This isn't the first time Ralph Lauren has designed a home furnishings collection that matches his ready-to-wear collection."There has definitely been a cross-fertilization," says Kathryn Richer, spokeswoman for the Ralph Lauren Home Collection."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 21, 2008
W hy have shares of Polo Ralph Lauren Corp. done well this year when many competitors haven't? - P.J. via the Internet The name on the company's famous brand of apparel and home decor still means something to shoppers. Sold by Macy's, Dillard's and other retailers and through its own Ralph Lauren, Club Monaco and Rugby stores, its merchandise has a distinctive style that has withstood the test of time. Net income in its fiscal first-quarter, which ended June 28, rose 8 percent thanks to strong international sales, prompting the company to raise full-year sales estimates.
FEATURES
October 3, 1996
Names like Ralph Lauren and Donna Karan are just some of the many glamorous labels that turn up among the barely used evening gowns, accessories and wardrobe basics at the annual Best Dressed Sale at the Evergreen Carriage House.The event, sponsored by the Women's Board of Johns Hopkins Hospital, takes place Oct. 3-5 at 4545 N. Charles St. The sale is open today and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. On Oct. 5, hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with all remaining stock, except furs, at half price. For more information, call 955-9341.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | November 26, 2007
Never give a party that's better than the movie!" says the veteran movie hit-maker David Brown. This is quoted in Hearst prexy Cathie Black's new book Basic Black, a how-to-succeed advice tome for aspiring women, which is in its fifth Crown printing. It bowed recently on the best-seller list, and the Wall Street Journal lists it as the numero uno biz advice book of the moment. What tickles me is all the women 50 and older and their men who read this book and say, "Gee, I wish I had seen this 20 years ago!
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
NEW YORK - True to her slow-but-sure style evolution, Laura Bush took in a runway show at fashion week here yesterday, a first for the wife of a sitting president (even if her view did lack the typical fashion week fare of visible thongs and brazen bralessness). The first lady sat in the front row of the Red Dress Collection, a benefit intended to raise awareness about heart disease among women, and applauded steadily as a roster of tastefully clad celebrity models teetered before her. Next to Bush sat Carolina Herrera, who created the red velvet jacket and slim skirt the first lady wore yesterday, and near Oscar de la Renta, who created her ballgown for last month's inauguration.
BUSINESS
By Pamela Sherrod and Pamela Sherrod,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 15, 2004
What does it mean to Stepfordize a home? Does it mean perfection - as in everything in its place? An abundance of flora and fauna from the driveway to lush fabrics? A robot dog that obeys all commands? Or is it about accepting sameness in order to fit in at any cost? The answer is yes across the board. When it comes to design - from the interior to the exterior - it means "the best of everything," like the "smart" refrigerator that tells you when you're out of milk, talking security systems, homes and lawns so precisely manicured that the smallest sneeze disturbs a flower bed. During a 1 1/2 -hour visit to the fictionalized town of Stepford, Conn.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
Don't go to Ooh la la because it's one of only a few retail establishments in the bar and restaurant-laden O'Donnell Square section of Canton. Go because it's cool. Stephanie Grandjean's little store sells an eclectic collection of affordable new and vintage clothing for men and women amid a dazzling array of kitsch art and furnishings. Need a little something new to wear to Burger Night at Looney's? Try a $34 denim dress by Elaine Perlou on for size. Going to brunch at Helen's Garden with your boyfriend's parents?
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | April 28, 2002
NEW YORK -- On a recent sunny day, Gail Williams breezed into an Upper East Side candy store with her daughter and grandchildren in tow. A 10-foot high statue of a chocolate bunny greeted them. A whimsical lollipop tree grew out of one corner. Shelves were filled with both vintage Pez dispensers and candy bars with labels like "PMS chocolate." And stools decorated in candy cane stripes, tabletops made of M&M mosaics and vases of chocolate roses filled the two-story space. Predictably, Williams' grandchildren raced through the store, playing with spin pops and checking out gummy bears in rare flavors like Poppin Pineapple.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | April 29, 2001
With Alan Greenspan mouthing off about a recession and dozens of dot-coms doing a death spiral, the economic forecast for the near future appears grim. Sure, whatever. Now, let's get to the important stuff -- planning your summer vacation. In light of the current financial fiasco, some might think it gauche to still take that six-week jaunt to the Italian Riviera this year. (If you can still afford it, that is.) However, fear not, this year's hip vacationing alternative is simple, fairly inexpensive and allows you to effect the earthy air of roughing it -- even if you aren't.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 18, 1993
Micro-miniskirts dominated the spring shows in Europe and New York -- bringing up the problem of the right hosiery to wear with them. Heavy tights are fine for winter woolens but not for lightweight fabrics like chiffon and silk. So designers offered two choices: bare legs or thigh-high stockings.The thigh-highs turned up in shows by designers as varied as Gianni Versace, Byron Lars, Ralph Lauren and Nicole Miller in opaque, sheer, fishnet and lace versions.A particularly fetching style, which has a border of lace at the top, would be a sexy accessory for a velvet or satin minidress this winter.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 23, 1993
All of a sudden, it seems, increasing numbers of black models are appearing in fashion advertising in Vogue, Elle, Mirabella and the New York Times magazine.The new Ralph Lauren national ads for his spring collection feature black model Tyra Banks, the 19-year-old sensation. Gianni Versace's new ad makes prominent use of Naomi Campbell, and Donna Karan used a cigar-smoking black man as a promotion for her menswear line.What's going on? Could it be that complaints from minorities are finally being heard by the fashion industry?
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
NEW YORK - After almost a week of going to designers' shows, here's the skinny on spring fashion - and we don't mean the models. Best Spectacle - Betsey Johnson This was the most talked about show of Fashion Week - and believe me, it wasn't because of the clothes. Johnson wisely created this buzz by sending 29 former Playboy Playmates down her runway wearing skimpy outfits that few naturally endowed women could fill quite as well. To the beat of songs like "I Want Your Sex," the Playmates flounced about wearing pink fur bikinis, tight tube dresses, super-short shorts and skirts with fluffy, "Please-grab-my-behind" bunny tails.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Don't hate fashion designer Matt Nye because he's beautiful, or because he's the companion of media maverick Jann Wenner, or because he's traveled through Europe in five-star style with former boss Ralph Lauren. "Yes, good looks, youth, a level of notoriety, can open doors. For whatever reason people may be curious about me," says Nye, 34, while lounging in his Upper West Side studio. "What you choose to do with those opportunities once they're created is up to you. In the end, it's your work that's going to speak louder than who you're with or what you look like."
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