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By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
"Flying Home And Other Stories," by Ralph Ellison. Random House. 176 pages. $23John Callahan, who collected the 13 short stories that appear in this book, included an interesting biographical anecdote in his introduction."I blundered into writing, Ellison admitted in a 1961 interview with novelist Richard G. Stern," Callahan writes.It shows, Ralphie boy, it shows.Mind you, this volume contains some fine short fiction, the best of which are the stories "In a Strange Country," "King of the Bingo Game" and "Flying Home."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Hollywood never provided a richer picture of the Jim Crow South than Clarence Brown's "Intruder in the Dust," a fresh, inspired adaptation of William Faulkner's 1948 novel. It's not a message movie about racial injustice. It's about the American experience of growing up by crashing through the precepts and prejudices of your town, your state, your region — and your family. It combines a coming-of-age fable and a detective story with an acute dissection of tribal beliefs and herd mentality.
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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
LEXINGTON, Va. - Confederate ghosts crowd the Robert E. Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University - ghosts of the rebel general, who served as president of the college and is buried in the chapel crypt; of his horse, Traveller, buried outside the chapel door; and of the dozen Washington and Lee students killed on Civil War battlefields. But a different sort of spirit ruled the chapel last weekend - that of Ralph Ellison, the late author of the 1952 classic Invisible Man. Scholars of African-American literature and political theory had gathered at the college from around the country for a conference marking the 50th anniversary of the book's publication, and kicked off the symposium in the hallowed chapel.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
SCHULZ AND PEANUTS -- David Michaelis HarperCollins / 672 pages / $34.95 For all the joy Charlie Brown and the gang gave readers over half a century, their creator, Charles M. Schulz, was a profoundly unhappy man. It's widely known that he hated the name Peanuts, which was foisted on the strip by his syndicate. But Michaelis, given access to family, friends and personal papers, reveals the full extent of Schulz's depression, tracing its origins in his Minnesota childhood, with parents reluctant to encourage his artistic dreams and yearbook editors who scrapped his illustrations without explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
I come to praise Ralph Ellison and to defend his legacy, to say once again that "Invisible Man" is one of the great literary testaments of all time. But now, a fine writer has been wronged. His reputation should have been allowed to stand on what he published in his lifetime."Juneteenth," the novel Ellison sweated and labored over for the better part of 40 years and never completed to his satisfaction, is now in the public domain. He deserves better from the literary trade.Why can't we be satisfied with what our great artists saw fit to give us before their deaths?
NEWS
By SAMUEL A. ZERVITZ | April 24, 1994
Ralph Ellison, the writer, died at 80 last weekend.I remember Ralph Ellison, the teacher. He taught an American literature course at Bard College, in Annandale-on-the-Hudson, New York, in 1958.That year, several times a week, he strolled the path from the nearby town of Tivoli to the campus where he held his class. The class met in the chapel of a country church at the edge of the school grounds. Ralph Ellison would magically appear from out of the woods that formed a barrier on the hillside and separated the old church from the banks of the Hudson River down below.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Born Frizzell Gray, Baltimore native Kweisi Mfume began his career as a political activist, first elected to the Baltimore City Council in 1979. After two terms on the council, in 1986, the Democrat was elected to the House of Representatives and went on to serve as the congressman from Maryland's 7th District for five terms. From 1996 to 2004 he was president and CEO of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Since a failed bid for the Senate in 2006, Mfume has toured the country on public speaking engagements.
FEATURES
By Paul D. Colford and Paul D. Colford,NEWSDAY | January 25, 1999
NEW YORK -- When the novelist Ralph Ellison died in April 1994, the status of his long-awaited follow-up to the 1952 classic "Invisible Man" was unclear.Eight short stories he had published since 1960 were pieces of a novel-in-progress, but a completed manuscript would have to be mined from his Harlem apartment. "I did have the impression it was close to being finished," Ellison's editor at Random House, Joe Fox, said at the time.But only now is the book finally ready for publication -- by Random House in June, under the title "Juneteenth," the name of a celebration marking the emancipation of Texas slaves on June 19, 1865.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
SCHULZ AND PEANUTS -- David Michaelis HarperCollins / 672 pages / $34.95 For all the joy Charlie Brown and the gang gave readers over half a century, their creator, Charles M. Schulz, was a profoundly unhappy man. It's widely known that he hated the name Peanuts, which was foisted on the strip by his syndicate. But Michaelis, given access to family, friends and personal papers, reveals the full extent of Schulz's depression, tracing its origins in his Minnesota childhood, with parents reluctant to encourage his artistic dreams and yearbook editors who scrapped his illustrations without explanation.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2007
Ralph Ellison By Arnold Rampersad Alfred A. Knopf / 657 pages / $35 "The blues is an impulse," Ralph Ellison explained, "to keep the painful details and episodes of a brutal experience alive in one's aching consciousness, to finger its jagged grain, and to transcend it, not by the consolation of philosophy but by squeezing from it a near-tragic, near comic lyricism. As a form, the blues is an autobiographical chronicle of personal catastrophe expressed lyrically." Ralph Ellison is a bluesy biography of the brilliant writer who won the National Book Award in 1953 for the incomparable Invisible Man - and never published another novel.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Born Frizzell Gray, Baltimore native Kweisi Mfume began his career as a political activist, first elected to the Baltimore City Council in 1979. After two terms on the council, in 1986, the Democrat was elected to the House of Representatives and went on to serve as the congressman from Maryland's 7th District for five terms. From 1996 to 2004 he was president and CEO of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Since a failed bid for the Senate in 2006, Mfume has toured the country on public speaking engagements.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | June 10, 2007
Ralph Ellison By Arnold Rampersad Alfred A. Knopf / 657 pages / $35 "The blues is an impulse," Ralph Ellison explained, "to keep the painful details and episodes of a brutal experience alive in one's aching consciousness, to finger its jagged grain, and to transcend it, not by the consolation of philosophy but by squeezing from it a near-tragic, near comic lyricism. As a form, the blues is an autobiographical chronicle of personal catastrophe expressed lyrically." Ralph Ellison is a bluesy biography of the brilliant writer who won the National Book Award in 1953 for the incomparable Invisible Man - and never published another novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
An even 50 years have gone by since the publication of Invisible Man. Eight years ago, Ralph Ellison died. With this much perspective, the question may be put impartially: How did the African-American author of a single major novel attain the literary heights? The best answer, of course, is to read or reread the book -- and to mingle with people across the racial divide. Still, what manner of man was Ellison, successively this Oklahoma City boy, Alabama college dropout, 15-cents-an-hour menial worker, veteran of the New York culture wars and, ultimately, friend of the famous?
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
LEXINGTON, Va. - Confederate ghosts crowd the Robert E. Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University - ghosts of the rebel general, who served as president of the college and is buried in the chapel crypt; of his horse, Traveller, buried outside the chapel door; and of the dozen Washington and Lee students killed on Civil War battlefields. But a different sort of spirit ruled the chapel last weekend - that of Ralph Ellison, the late author of the 1952 classic Invisible Man. Scholars of African-American literature and political theory had gathered at the college from around the country for a conference marking the 50th anniversary of the book's publication, and kicked off the symposium in the hallowed chapel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2000
William A. Galston is a professor in the School of Public Affairs, University of Maryland, and Director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy. From 1993 until 1995 he served as Deputy Assistant to President Clinton for Domestic Policy. "One Nation, After All" by Alan Wolfe. Based on interviews with hundreds of middle-class families across the United States, this book documents the emergence of a new moral consensus based on quiet everyday virtues and tolerance for differing religions and ways of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M. DION THOMPSON and M. DION THOMPSON,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
I come to praise Ralph Ellison and to defend his legacy, to say once again that "Invisible Man" is one of the great literary testaments of all time. But now, a fine writer has been wronged. His reputation should have been allowed to stand on what he published in his lifetime."Juneteenth," the novel Ellison sweated and labored over for the better part of 40 years and never completed to his satisfaction, is now in the public domain. He deserves better from the literary trade.Why can't we be satisfied with what our great artists saw fit to give us before their deaths?
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
An even 50 years have gone by since the publication of Invisible Man. Eight years ago, Ralph Ellison died. With this much perspective, the question may be put impartially: How did the African-American author of a single major novel attain the literary heights? The best answer, of course, is to read or reread the book -- and to mingle with people across the racial divide. Still, what manner of man was Ellison, successively this Oklahoma City boy, Alabama college dropout, 15-cents-an-hour menial worker, veteran of the New York culture wars and, ultimately, friend of the famous?
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | April 18, 1994
There may never be another literary career as melancholic as that of Ralph Ellison. He gave us one great novel, "Invisible Man." He never finished a second novel, though he labored on it for more than 30 years and several hundred pages of it were lost in a fire in the mid-1960s. When the writer's death was announced Saturday, at the age of 80, his editor said that he had left behind a manuscript of more than 1,000 pages, but did not know if it could be published.Perhaps no serious American writer had a literary reputation based upon one book as much as Mr. Ellison did with "Invisible Man."
FEATURES
By Paul D. Colford and Paul D. Colford,NEWSDAY | January 25, 1999
NEW YORK -- When the novelist Ralph Ellison died in April 1994, the status of his long-awaited follow-up to the 1952 classic "Invisible Man" was unclear.Eight short stories he had published since 1960 were pieces of a novel-in-progress, but a completed manuscript would have to be mined from his Harlem apartment. "I did have the impression it was close to being finished," Ellison's editor at Random House, Joe Fox, said at the time.But only now is the book finally ready for publication -- by Random House in June, under the title "Juneteenth," the name of a celebration marking the emancipation of Texas slaves on June 19, 1865.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane and Gregory Kane,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1996
"Flying Home And Other Stories," by Ralph Ellison. Random House. 176 pages. $23John Callahan, who collected the 13 short stories that appear in this book, included an interesting biographical anecdote in his introduction."I blundered into writing, Ellison admitted in a 1961 interview with novelist Richard G. Stern," Callahan writes.It shows, Ralphie boy, it shows.Mind you, this volume contains some fine short fiction, the best of which are the stories "In a Strange Country," "King of the Bingo Game" and "Flying Home."
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