Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRajiv Gandhi
IN THE NEWS

Rajiv Gandhi

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ROBERT B. HAYDEN | May 26, 1991
The assassination of Rajiv Gandhi has produced many pessimistic assessments of the future of Indian democracy and even of India's future as a single state.The death of the last member of the Nehru/Gandhi dynasty has been seen by commentators within and outside of India as the breaking of unifying force, of perhaps the only power capable of holding together such a vast, complex and conflicted land. The desperate act by the Congress Party leadership of trying to name Rajiv Gandhi's widow, an Italian woman who became an Indian citizen less than ten years ago, to be head of the party can be seen as a concrete manifestation of this view: that none but a Gandhi could hold the loyalty of the Indian masses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 10, 1998
THE CONGRESS Party created modern India. Founded 113 years ago, it opposed British imperialism and crusaded for India's independence as a democratic, secular state. The party survived the loss of Muslim Pakistan and made India an inclusive mosaic of peoples, languages and religions. For all but five of the 51 years of independence, Congress has ruled.There is no more eloquent statement of the party's sad decline than its clamor to be led by an Italian Catholic woman who speaks Hindi and English with a thick accent.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The assassination of Rajiv Gandhi, halting the political dynasty begun by his grandfather, renders India's Congress Party leaderless and raises fears of a violent backlash against whatever group might be deemed responsible.Over the long term, yesterday's bombing was seen here as adding new strains to India's struggle to reform itself economically and resist separatist pressures."It comes at the worst possible time," said Peter Galbraith, a toSenate Foreign Relations Committee staffer who got to know Rajiv Gandhi as a youth when his father, John Kenneth Galbraith, was ambassador to India.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | September 13, 1991
New Delhi, India -- FOR MONTHS this spring and early summer, the headlines every day in Delhi horrified Indians of all classes and castes: The country's valuable gold was being physically removed and shipped to London.Four tons on July 4, 20 tons on July 7, 10 tons on July 11, 12 tons on July 18. Nothing in this troubled country has shaken people so much as what has seemed to many to be almost an existential draining of the national blood."Gold is the Indian peasant's security; there is great sentiment for gold," Inder Malhotra, former editor of the Times of India and now a prominent columnist, told me. "Indians cannot hold gold outside of India.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 22, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- As the mother died, so has the son, in a brutal assassination that now has ended one of the democratic world's longest-serving elected dynasties.Rajiv Gandhi, dead at 46 after a powerful bomb exploded in a remote south Indian village, represented the last of three generations of Indian leaders committed to socialism, secularism and the promotion of the Indian nation as the vanguard of the Third World.In his youth, Gandhi was the black sheep of the family that had led India from centuries of colonial repression into nearly a half-century of democratic -- although often chaotic -- freedom.
NEWS
May 22, 1991
The motive for terrorism in Tamil Nadu may stem from ethnic violence in Sri Lanka, a foreign country where Tamils are the minority and where Rajiv Gandhi sent Indian troops. It is not the basis of violence in Kashmir, where many seek independence; in Punjab, where Sikhs seek autonomy; or across the northern Hindi Belt, where parties are at each other's throats and tensions are fierce among Hindu castes and with Moslems.The bomb at Sriperumpudur in Tamil Nadu killed more than Rajiv Gandhi, aged 46, grandson of the nation's founder, son of its powerful leader, English-educated airline pilot with an Italian wife, the non-political son, accidental man of destiny, former prime minister and potential savior of the nation.
NEWS
May 22, 1991
Since India gained its independence shortly after World War II, three of its four major leaders have fallen at the hands of assassins. First there was Mohandas K. Gandhi, killed by a fanatical fellow Hindu; then in 1984 Indira Gandhi, slain by extremists who infiltrated her own bodyguard; and now Rajiv Gandhi, killed yesterday by parties unknown but almost certainly from one of the warring factions of that troubled country.India is touted as the 'world's most populous democracy,' but against its background of political violence, the question must be asked: Is India simply too large to govern as a democracy?
NEWS
June 25, 1991
Durable, strong leadership is what India needs, but is not what India is getting. Circumstances and the Congress Party would not allow that.P. V. Narasimha Rao, who was named prime minister and given four weeks to form a government, is 69, recently had a heart bypass operation, did not seek re-election to Parliament and must do so soon, has been loyal the late Prime Ministers Indira and Rajiv Gandhi, lacks a power base in the nation or Congress Party and...
NEWS
April 10, 1998
THE CONGRESS Party created modern India. Founded 113 years ago, it opposed British imperialism and crusaded for India's independence as a democratic, secular state. The party survived the loss of Muslim Pakistan and made India an inclusive mosaic of peoples, languages and religions. For all but five of the 51 years of independence, Congress has ruled.There is no more eloquent statement of the party's sad decline than its clamor to be led by an Italian Catholic woman who speaks Hindi and English with a thick accent.
NEWS
By Lester M. Salamon | June 25, 1991
THE CAMPAIGN billboards I saw dominating the streets o New Delhi in the week preceding the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi told the story of modern India all too well: "Vote Congress," they proclaimed, "for stability."They did not mention progress, independence, freedom, socialism, development or any of the other values that gave rise to the Congress Party more than 70 years ago and that filled India with hope in the heady days following independence in Lester M.Salamon1947. Just stability, internal peace, a degree of calm.
NEWS
June 25, 1991
Durable, strong leadership is what India needs, but is not what India is getting. Circumstances and the Congress Party would not allow that.P. V. Narasimha Rao, who was named prime minister and given four weeks to form a government, is 69, recently had a heart bypass operation, did not seek re-election to Parliament and must do so soon, has been loyal the late Prime Ministers Indira and Rajiv Gandhi, lacks a power base in the nation or Congress Party and...
NEWS
By Lester M. Salamon | June 25, 1991
THE CAMPAIGN billboards I saw dominating the streets o New Delhi in the week preceding the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi told the story of modern India all too well: "Vote Congress," they proclaimed, "for stability."They did not mention progress, independence, freedom, socialism, development or any of the other values that gave rise to the Congress Party more than 70 years ago and that filled India with hope in the heady days following independence in Lester M.Salamon1947. Just stability, internal peace, a degree of calm.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 18, 1991
NEW DELHI -- The vote counting in India's national election was headed toward completion late last night, but the serious politicking was just beginning.With the Congress Party projected to fall about 25 to 30 seats short of a majority in India's Parliament, potential allies from among its left-wing opponents were sending strong signals that Congress will have to offer concessions in exchange for their support in forming a new government.While those compromises were not spelled out yesterday, it appeared clear that Congress will not have a free hand in running the new government when it takes power.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 28, 1991
New York -- WHEN RAJIV GANDHI came to Washington as prime minister in 1985, he was a breathtaking figure. He strode into meetings like an Indian prince of old, resembling in his stunning white Nehru suits some young god of light.Last week, white sheets covered the handsome young man, his face blown apart by still another unknown assassin's bomb, his body ripped open and black ened where only moments before followers had pressed garlands of flowers into his hands.We saw a white sari, this time worn in mourning by his Italian-born wife, Sonia.
NEWS
By ROBERT B. HAYDEN | May 26, 1991
The assassination of Rajiv Gandhi has produced many pessimistic assessments of the future of Indian democracy and even of India's future as a single state.The death of the last member of the Nehru/Gandhi dynasty has been seen by commentators within and outside of India as the breaking of unifying force, of perhaps the only power capable of holding together such a vast, complex and conflicted land. The desperate act by the Congress Party leadership of trying to name Rajiv Gandhi's widow, an Italian woman who became an Indian citizen less than ten years ago, to be head of the party can be seen as a concrete manifestation of this view: that none but a Gandhi could hold the loyalty of the Indian masses.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | May 24, 1991
London. -- In his great novel, ''Passage to India,'' E.M. Forster wrote of India as ''swelling here, shrinking there, like some low but indestructible force of life.'' It was probably not a fair description, even in the old days of the British raj, but it is one that many observers will subconsciously resort to as they contemplate the murder of former the prime minister, Rajiv Gandhi.Yes, India will survive and outlive one terrible murder, but not, as the caricature would have it, as an inert mass simply swallowing the memory into the dark hole of its overwhelming numbers and unfathomable poverty.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | May 24, 1991
London. -- In his great novel, ''Passage to India,'' E.M. Forster wrote of India as ''swelling here, shrinking there, like some low but indestructible force of life.'' It was probably not a fair description, even in the old days of the British raj, but it is one that many observers will subconsciously resort to as they contemplate the murder of former the prime minister, Rajiv Gandhi.Yes, India will survive and outlive one terrible murder, but not, as the caricature would have it, as an inert mass simply swallowing the memory into the dark hole of its overwhelming numbers and unfathomable poverty.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 18, 1991
NEW DELHI -- The vote counting in India's national election was headed toward completion late last night, but the serious politicking was just beginning.With the Congress Party projected to fall about 25 to 30 seats short of a majority in India's Parliament, potential allies from among its left-wing opponents were sending strong signals that Congress will have to offer concessions in exchange for their support in forming a new government.While those compromises were not spelled out yesterday, it appeared clear that Congress will not have a free hand in running the new government when it takes power.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 23, 1991
NEW DELHI, India -- In a house where Rajiv Gandhi played as a little boy, the mutilated body of the former Indian prime minister was placed on a slab of ice and cloaked by his country's flag yesterday as thousands of mourners stood beneath a blazing sun for at least an hour to catch a brief, last glimpse of him.India's capital was in the first day of a week of official mourning for the 46-year-old Mr. Gandhi, who was slain along with 15 others by a bomb...
NEWS
May 22, 1991
Since India gained its independence shortly after World War II, three of its four major leaders have fallen at the hands of assassins. First there was Mohandas K. Gandhi, killed by a fanatical fellow Hindu; then in 1984 Indira Gandhi, slain by extremists who infiltrated her own bodyguard; and now Rajiv Gandhi, killed yesterday by parties unknown but almost certainly from one of the warring factions of that troubled country.India is touted as the 'world's most populous democracy,' but against its background of political violence, the question must be asked: Is India simply too large to govern as a democracy?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.