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NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | May 16, 1997
AMERICA is a pro-child nation with anti-child policies.There is serious talk on Capitol Hill that the proposed $500 tax credit for children will be slashed -- perhaps to $200.Why? There is only a finite amount of money in the alleged budget agreement for tax cuts, and that amount cannot accommodate the $500 credit as well as the other proposed tax draw-downs for estates, IRAs, capital gains and college tuition.Idiotic. The tax credit for children is by far the most important.Curiously, it is the one that gets the most criticism, sometimes by supply-side conservatives, those great populist tribunes, who say it's not the way to cut taxes because, get this, "people will only spend it."
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Ann and Dominic Wiker loved life in their Federal Hill home. As a professional couple in their 30s, the neighborhood was ideal - they could walk to most attractions, shops and restaurants. It seemed there was always something fun going on outside their door. Then parenthood happened, and with it came the idea of moving to the suburbs. They would move, but they wouldn't leave Federal Hill. Nine years later, the Wikers - mom, dad, 9-year old Alex and 7-year old Tommy - have, to their delight, become a poster family for raising children in an urban environment.
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BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2001
There's growing going on once again in the Orchards. Not fruit. That hasn't grown here since the 1800s. But children. Young families have moved into this North Baltimore community along Charles Street, and its yards and sidewalks are full of kids. And that's the healthiest sign a neighborhood can have, according to its residents. "There were very few children when I moved here 37 years ago," remembered Walter Hale. "But now there are many, many children, and that's a plus." Young people decide to raise their families in the Orchards because of its handsome brick Colonial homes, its quiet tree-lined streets, but most of all, because of its location.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When Mike Leiter practices archery at the Harford Bowmen club at Susquehanna State Park, it might not appear he is having fun. Leiter, one of the most successful archers in the country, is a quiet person, especially when practicing. Each shot, even when he's not at the club and is just practicing at his home in Fallston, is a slow process. He draws the bow back deliberately and takes several seconds to line up his shot. After the release, Leiter's stoic face doesn't change, even if he knows it was a bull's-eye.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Benjamin Spock's enduring gift is the comfort he provided parents who came to a new job with no training.In his landmark 1946 book, "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care," the tall, graceful Yankee sent parents a simple but profound message: There really were answers to their questions about raising children. Until then, pediatricians used intuition when it came to behavioral or developmental issues or ignored them.Spock's book allowed parents to feed their babies when the babies cried, not according to an arbitrarily imposed doctor's schedule.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
The number of American women who are raising children without a husband present grew by more than 25 percent during the 1990s, according to data released today from the 2000 census. The census in April counted nearly 7.6 million households headed by women with children younger than 18 at home, but no husband. There were just over 6 million in 1990. The 10-year rate of increase was nearly twice the 13 percent growth of the U.S. population as a whole. "That is definitely a huge trend, and it is worldwide," said sociologist Steven P. Martin of the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
It seems that everyone suddenly has an opinion regarding the Washington Redskins' supposedly offensive name ( "The curse of Redskins," June 16). As our nation gets duped with more on the PC bandwagon, I have a suggestion for Redskins team owner Daniel Wilson: Consider changing the team's name to the "Washington Redskin Potatoes. " At least it may keep those of us with inherent common sense some armament to fend off the fools who are already under the Kool-Aid-intoxicating influence of political correctness.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | July 6, 1996
A TRAGEDY WAS averted in Harford County recently: A family of five and two young houseguests were nearly overcome by carbon monoxide that had seeped into the house where they were sleeping. Had nausea not awakened family members, ''who knows what could have happened,'' a rescue worker was quoted in the Bel Air Aegis.I found the incident especially disturbing, because I know the family. The father, Adolfo Negron, is involved in youth recreation in Harford's Emmorton area. He helps direct a basketball program that serves 640 children, and coaches two and three teams a season.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
William T. Roberson, a former Westinghouse employee who enjoyed gardening, died of kidney failure Feb. 26 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 89. Born and raised in East Baltimore, Mr. Roberson dropped out of City College at 16 to help support his family, working with the Canton Railroad Co. and clothing manufacturers. He attended night classes to earn his high school diploma. During World War II, Mr. Roberson joined the merchant marine, ferrying oil between New York and the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Mothers today are having such a hard time balancing the demands of family and work that they are looking back wistfully to the traditional "Leave It to Beaver"-type family structure and doubting their own success in raising their children.In a survey of American women by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, 41 percent said they thought that a family in which the father worked and the mother stayed at home was best for raising children. Only 17 percent said it was %J beneficial for children and society to have mothers work outside the home, and 37 percent said it made no difference.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 20, 2014
Faithful readers know that the impending wedding of my daughter has caused me to clean out all the rats' nests and cubby holes in my basement that haven't been inspected in years. You'd think we were holding the reception there. Anyway, among the boxes was one containing about 15 years of canceled checks, bank statements, health insurance forms and tax returns. Even I, renowned recycling maven, haven't got the nerve to put that much personal information out on the curb, so I purchased my own personal shredder, which is a lot like purchasing your own personal fax machine.
NEWS
By Edie Manney | December 25, 2013
Picture a young, newly divorced mom in the early 1970s, with three young children and hopes and dreams, trying desperately to make it on her own but finding life impossible. Imagine not having enough money to buy food for your children, or to afford to pay rent, and not feeling safe - feeling your life was completely unraveling, but you still have these children to care for and you have no way to make life work. That was the position my mother found herself in. She recently told me her story and said Head Start, the federal early learning program for children up to age 5, was her "salvation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Sarah W. McCardell, a Govans homemaker who happily cared for her 10 children while teaching them lasting values and enduring life lessons that she imparted with love, humor and grace, died Friday of a stroke at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 89. "My mother was a wonderful person, and I feel it was fortunate that we had my parents living with us. She was not just my mother, but one of my best friends," said a daughter, Margaret Ellen Clemmens of Stoneleigh.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
It seems that everyone suddenly has an opinion regarding the Washington Redskins' supposedly offensive name ( "The curse of Redskins," June 16). As our nation gets duped with more on the PC bandwagon, I have a suggestion for Redskins team owner Daniel Wilson: Consider changing the team's name to the "Washington Redskin Potatoes. " At least it may keep those of us with inherent common sense some armament to fend off the fools who are already under the Kool-Aid-intoxicating influence of political correctness.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Kathleen T. Perry, a devout Roman Catholic who opened up her heart and home to children, died Tuesday at St. Martin's Home in Catonsville after a recent medical procedure. The longtime Fallston resident was 93. "Kathleen was a saintly person. Everything was positive, and she loved everyone," said Sister Lourdes Miranda, a member of the Little Sisters of the Poor and director of the Lourdes Unit at St. Martin's Home where Mrs. Perry resided. "She was a very devout Catholic who always went to Mass.
FEATURES
Jessica Gregg | November 27, 2012
The benefits and challenges of raising bilingual children Growing up in Argentina, Monica Fetzer remembers times when she wanted to speak only Spanish. But her parents, the children of German immigrants, spoke German in their home. They sent Monica and her siblings to a bilingual school where they spoke Spanish in the morning and German in the afternoon. On Sunday, they attended a German church. Learning and speaking in two languages was part of her daily life. It was hard work, Monica recalls, and there were so many times when it would have been easier just to speak Spanish.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
FROM "FOCUS," the quarterly report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation for disadvantaged children:"Thirteen years ago Congress set out to realign the policy framework for the nation's child welfare system. The Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-272), a fundamental reorientation of the nation's protective service systems, encouraged states to stabilize vulnerable, crisis-ridden families rather than rely so readily on removal to foster care as the primary means of securing the welfare of an at-risk child."
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
Margaret C. Melvin, a homemaker and mother to 25 foster children, died in her sleep Tuesday at her home in West Baltimore. She was 103. She was born Margaret Clements in Baltimore and spent all her life in the city. She attended public school in Baltimore and began working in food services at Marine Hospital and at the Elkridge Country Club in the 1920s. In 1943, she married Semon C. Melvin. A few years after they were married, the couple began taking in foster children. After her husband died in 1976, Mrs. Melvin continued to look after children in her neighborhood.
NEWS
By Peter Sprigg | February 1, 2011
Do children matter in Maryland? That is the question that will be at stake in 2011, when the Maryland legislature considers radically changing the definition of our most fundamental social institution — marriage. The question of whether Maryland should place its highest stamp of official government affirmation on sexual unions between two men or two women actually has little to do with debates over "sexual orientation" and even less to do with bromides about "equality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 3, 2009
"There was once a witch who desired to know everything. ... Her name was Watho, and she had a wolf in her mind." A pretty cool hook for a fairy tale and, as it turns out, a pretty cool inspiration for an original production being staged by Single Carrot Theatre under the intriguing title "Illuminoctem." The source material comes from 19th-century Scottish author and clergyman George MacDonald, who counted the likes of Tennyson and Lewis Carroll among his friends, the likes of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis among those he influenced.
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