Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRaise Rates
IN THE NEWS

Raise Rates

BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 4, 2005
The Federal Reserve angered traders and mystified markets yesterday by inexplicably forgetting to include a crucial phrase in its closely watched policy statement after it raised interest rates another quarter-point. The government's blunder sent a wrong signal to investors about the Fed's view of inflation trends, and it wasn't corrected for nearly two hours. During that time, traders in the stock and bond markets laid down financial bets based on a Fed "policy shift" that turned out to be an illusion.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Annapolis, a colonial city, was never designed to provide parking for a mix of multicar families, restaurant and shop patrons, tourists, and a seasonal corps of politicians and lobbyists. But that's exactly what the city of narrow streets and cramped blocks does. And officials say the daily quest for parking spots gets harder every year. So Mayor Ellen O. Moyer is proposing a comprehensive overhaul of parking policies that would increase meter rates, protect residential streets from tourist parking, divert parkers to a few garages and satellite lots, and ramp up law enforcement against those who park illegally.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2005
Parking meter rates would double, some time limits would shorten, and more short-term parking would be encouraged in city garages under a committee proposal to overhaul downtown Annapolis' parking pricing policies. An 11-member ad hoc committee appointed by Mayor Ellen O. Moyer released last week its draft recommendations for easing the parking crunch downtown. The more controversial proposals would raise parking meter rates from 50 cents to $1 per hour on all streets and cut the time limit at some meters from two hours to one, with the limits expiring at 6 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. Committee members sought to encourage turnover at metered spaces, draw city residents into parking garages, and encourage employees to park at the Navy Marine Corps Memorial Stadium lot and take the free shuttle.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - To almost no one's surprise, the Federal Reserve Bank nudged interest rates up another quarter-point to 2.5 percent yesterday. What instead set Wall Street chattering is the environment in which policy-makers made their decision: less-than-robust hiring and relatively low inflation. "If they were listening to me, they would not be raising interest rates today," economist Ray Perryman said. "The economy is not at the level we would call robust yet. The danger is every time you raise interest rates, you make investment look unprofitable."
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2004
This Christmas season was sweeter for Tanika Thompson and Lynn Neubauer, two Maryland women who thought they wouldn't live long enough to celebrate it. Both received a diagnosis of liver cancer - Thompson in late 2003 and Neubauer last January - a lethal disease that had spread from other organs in their bodies. Both marked their lives in days and months, not years. But a new procedure at the University of Maryland Medical Center that sends microscopic beads of radiation directly to tumors gave them both new leases on life.
NEWS
By Fred Schulte and M. William Salganik and Fred Schulte and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2004
As state legislators gear up for a possible special session to tackle the medical malpractice insurance crisis, debate over the cause has tended to focus on greedy trial lawyers or incompetent doctors. In the middle stands Maryland's top insurer of physicians, the Medical Mutual Liability Insurance Society of Maryland. Its rate increases for more than 6,000 doctors have left some saying they will be forced to shut their offices or curtail risky services such as delivering babies. Med Mutual is suffering from a surge in malpractice payouts last year -- including 20 cases it paid $1 million or more to close.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Federal Reserve stood its ground yesterday and raised interest rates modestly for the second time this summer, despite signs of a weaker job market and slower economic growth. The central bank coupled its interest-rate increase with a sunny outlook, saying the economy is poised to shake off its sluggishness and resume "a stronger pace of expansion going forward," reassuring words that helped boost the stock market. Wall Street responded with enthusiasm. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 130.01 points to close at 9,944.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
An audit released yesterday revealed that the city government lost out on potentially millions in revenue by failing to increase rates charged to electric, telephone and fiber-optic companies that lease underground public space for wires and cables. Baltimore's auditor, Yovonda Brooks, told the city's spending board yesterday that $3.5 million was squandered over the past three years because rates were not increased from $0.58 to $1.16 per foot of underground space used by companies. The report estimated that the city could miss out on an additional $9 million over the next five years.
BUSINESS
By CBS MARKETWATCH | June 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - Looking at the past is no guide to predicting how quickly and aggressively the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates, Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan told Maryland's senior senator. In a letter released yesterday, Greenspan repeated his earlier comment that the current low rates "must be returned to a more neutral setting at some point." The timing and intensity of the Federal Open Market Committee's coming rate increases are highly uncertain. Financial markets are pricing in a quarter-point increase in the federal funds rate by the end of June and at least a full percentage point increase by the end of the year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.