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BUSINESS
By David Novich | May 3, 1998
THE STOCK MARKET somersaulted last week, as speculation about the strength of the economy and the Federal Reserve Board raising interest rates boosted volatility.On Monday, reports that the Fed would raise rates made the Dow Jones industrial average average fall nearly 147 points. By Thursday, the Dow had regained the loss amid growing confidence that the economy is not overheating.The wild ride has some concerned that the market is overvalued and that it's only a matter of time before investors take a beating.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
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BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | May 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Senior Federal Reserve officials confirmed yesterday that the central bank is poised to raise interest rates repeatedly in the months ahead, with some policy-makers embracing a controversial formula that could prompt them to call for rate increases whenever national unemployment falls below 6.5 percent.Now that the recovery is picking up speed and the economy is generating hundreds of thousands of new jobs each month, Fed officials say they are convinced that short-term interest rates must go considerably higher to prevent inflationary pressures from building.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday is set to approve parking rate increases at two downtown garages. Rates for those parking between four and 12 hours at the Arena Garage, near the Baltimore Arena, will increase from $14 to $15. "Early bird" parking rates at the Market Garage, near Lexington Market, will increase from $6 to $7 while the fee charged to those who park between four and 24 hours will increase from $8 to $9. The Parking Authority...
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | September 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Bear, Stearns & Co. chief economist Wayne Angell said the Federal Reserve will probably raise interest rates by a half-point when its policy-making committee meets next week."
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III | March 22, 1998
LAST WEEK, the Shadow Open Market Committee, a watchdog group of mostly academics that scrutinizes the actions of the Federal Reserve, said it was concerned that rising wages and an increasing money supply would lead to inflation.Indeed, the group recommended that the central bank raise interest rates to slow the growth in the money supply. Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan, speaking to Congress last month, said the economy's performance was "exemplary," with inflation falling despite the fact that unemployment was at a 24-year low.We asked experts whether a bump in rates might be in order.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 6, 1993
NEW YORK -- After nine months of predicting changes in Federal Reserve monetary policy that never occurred, investors and traders in the credit markets expect today's meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee will result in an agreement by Fed officials to hold short-term rates stable.A decision by the committee to maintain rates would modify its assessment in May, when Fed officials voted to hold rates stable for the immediate future but hinted strongly at their willingness to raise rates if inflation worsened.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
The price of a barrel of crude hit a record high this week. Housing prices continue to soar. Health care and insurance costs are up by double digits. Food is getting more expensive. Utility prices are jumping. Tuition costs are out of control. Sounds as if it might be time to dust off those circa 1974 "Whip Inflation Now" buttons that were once the laughingstock of the Ford administration, right? Actually, the Federal Reserve says not to worry - at least for now. The Fed raised a key interest rate another quarter-point yesterday and indicated that its more-than-yearlong campaign to contain inflation can continue at an unhurried pace.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
A lower-than-expected increase in wage and benefits costs helped ease worries yesterday that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month and sent stock prices soaring.The Dow Jones industrial average, the most widely followed market gauge, rose 227.64 points, closing at 10,622.53. The rally extended Wednesday's 92-point gain. It was the Dow's biggest advance since it rose 235.24 on Sept. 3.The market has been dominated in recent weeks by debate on inflation and interest rates.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Talk about mixed signals.Over here is the green light: an accelerating economy spewing products and jobs.And here, at the same crossroads, is the 6-foot-4 cop with both hands raised: half a decade of meek inflation.What's a central banker to do?Tossed salad is common fare for the Federal Reserve when it sorts through economic indicators. But rarely are the signs as contradictory as they will be Tuesday, when top Fed officials next meet to set interest-rate and money-supply policy.The U.S. economy is buzzing into its seventh straight year of growth.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
The dominant carrier on Maryland's health exchange, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, will raise premiums beginning in January, though not nearly as much as the company wanted, state regulators announced Friday. CareFirst won approval to raise rates as much as 16 percent on the three plans it offers, while the Maryland Insurance Administration agreed to reduced rates requested from the three other companies that sell policies on the exchange — Evergreen Health Cooperative, Kaiser Permanente and UnitedHealthcare's All Savers Insurance Co. The companies made their pitches, and won approvals, based on information from the first open enrollment on the state's exchange, formed under the federal Affordable Care Act. The rates would not apply to most Marylanders, who get health insurance through their employers.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | May 27, 2014
To head off a tough bout with stagflation - slow growth and high inflation - the Federal Reserve should start raising interest rates soon. Most economists expected 2014 to be a breakout year. A surge in new home construction was expected to instigate growth and job creation throughout the economy, even as inflation remained reasonably tame. But so far the reverse appears to be happening. Over the last year, consumer prices are up 2.0 percent - nicely within the Fed's target range - but in recent months, food and energy prices have increased strongly.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore officials voted Wednesday to raise water and sewer rates by 42 percent over three years, despite residents who pleaded for relief and a city audit that called the increase "higher than necessary. " Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who controls the spending panel that approved the increase, said she didn't have the "luxury" of voting against it. As mayor, she said, it's her responsibility to work to prevent breakdowns and repair water system problems. "Crumbling infrastructures have reached a crisis point in cities across America, including Baltimore," Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Baltimore County residents served by the city's water system won't see a rate increase this year, county officials said Tuesday, despite a city proposal to impose a 15 percent increase. Baltimore City's Department of Public Works proposed the rate increase this week. The city and county have had a cost-sharing agreement for decades. But a county spokeswoman said budget officials have already determined that the county can absorb the increased cost without passing it on to county customers - even though they don't yet have specifics on how much the county might have to cover.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
State regulators considering Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s request for higher rates will hear this week and next from the people least likely to agree: BGE's ratepayers. So far, though, the volume is hardly deafening: Only one person spoke Monday night at the first of five public hearings about the case. "This is pretty sad," said Julie Grudzinskas of Annapolis after giving the evening's only testimony. "It's pathetic, actually. But I know why more people aren't here. ... It's daunting.
NEWS
March 30, 2011
Having taught in Baltimore City for 31 years, including 22 years at Western High School — and having recently retired — I feel a few points need be addressed regarding the op-ed column, "Baltimore's graduation rate: a success story still being written" (March 28). Much has been made recently of the stunning improvement in graduation rates in Baltimore City; very little has been made of some of the reasons. For years at my old school, roughly 20 or 25 seniors (about 10 percent)
BUSINESS
July 20, 1993
AT&T plans to raise ratesAmerican Telephone & Telegraph Co., signaling it believes the long-distance pricing wars are history, said yesterday that it was raising rates on its business and consumer long-distance services.It said rates for most business services would increase an average of 3.9 percent, while rates on direct-dialed consumer calls would increase overall by less than 1 percent.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2008
Company bringing 25 jobs to Cumberland CUMBERLAND : A company that manages supplies for the aerospace industry says it is opening a warehouse in Cumberland that will create 25 jobs. Patton-air is a division of the British company Umeco PLC. Gov. Martin O'Malley says Pattonair has signed a supply agreement with ATK Tactical Propulsion and Controls, which operates out of the Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in nearby Rocket Center, W.Va. The Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development is providing Pattonair with a $50,000 conditional grant to assist with startup costs.
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