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NEWS
April 20, 1999
PRESSURE is building again for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates. Though little evidence suggests that the economy is overheating and inflation is reigniting, the chorus for raising interest rates is getting louder. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan should ignore those calls and leave rates where they are.Sure, some worrisome signs have surfaced. The economy is extremely strong in the ninth year of the current recovery. In the last quarter of 1998, the economy grew at an astounding rate of 6.1 percent.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | May 27, 2014
To head off a tough bout with stagflation - slow growth and high inflation - the Federal Reserve should start raising interest rates soon. Most economists expected 2014 to be a breakout year. A surge in new home construction was expected to instigate growth and job creation throughout the economy, even as inflation remained reasonably tame. But so far the reverse appears to be happening. Over the last year, consumer prices are up 2.0 percent - nicely within the Fed's target range - but in recent months, food and energy prices have increased strongly.
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NEWS
May 20, 1999
THE Federal Reserve's decision not to immediately raise interest rates may have temporarily calmed jittery bond and stock markets. But the recent jump in consumer prices -- the largest one-month rise in nine years -- fueled speculation that the Fed may soon raise short-term rates.Judging from Tuesday's announcement, however, the Fed's Open Market Committee is concerned that inflation looms. It indicated it will raise rates if the nation's economy doesn't slow on its own. The central bankers believe that with a tight labor market and growing disposable income, the danger of inflation is growing.
SPORTS
By Adam Testa | July 13, 2012
A disappointing trend has been developing in WWE in recent months. Rather than actually using television programs like Raw and Smackdown to build undercard matches for pay-per-views, the company has been announcing minimal matches and then having "surprise" contests on the monthly showcases. This strategy wouldn't be so bad if the surprise additions were matches of any consequence or interest. Instead, they wind up being standard-fare squash matches. just as fans see for free on weekly television.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
A lower-than-expected increase in wage and benefits costs helped ease worries yesterday that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month and sent stock prices soaring.The Dow Jones industrial average, the most widely followed market gauge, rose 227.64 points, closing at 10,622.53. The rally extended Wednesday's 92-point gain. It was the Dow's biggest advance since it rose 235.24 on Sept. 3.The market has been dominated in recent weeks by debate on inflation and interest rates.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
Only five weeks ago, the Federal Reserve Board gave inflation a hefty one-two punch and strongly hinted that it was through raising interest rates for a few months.Then the dollar briefly dipped below the all-but-metaphysical 100-yen level, world stock and bond markets swooned, politicians called news conferences, and yesterday, there was Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan, back before a congressional committee, saying the economy looks rosy and inflation is in check.This time, however, Mr. Greenspan declined to even discuss whether the Fed will raise interest rates -- for a fifth time this year -- this time to defend the dollar.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 23, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks gained yesterday for the first time in four days as the dollar rebounded and bonds rallied, easing concern the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates for the fifth time this year."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 4, 1994
NEW YORK -- Most U.S. stocks declined yesterday afterTC report showing September manufacturing activity was stronger than expected bolstered expectations that the Federal Reserve soon will raise interest rates to cool inflation.Semiconductors paced the retreat after a profit warning from Advanced Micro Devices Inc., a computer chip maker whose stock was the most actively traded yesterday."We've had the view the economy is too strong for the Fed, and this report confirms that view," said Jeffrey Applegate, chief investment strategist at CS First Boston Corp.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 21, 1993
U.S. stocks finished mixed as concern that the Federal Reserve may soon raise interest rates offset optimism about growth in the economy and in corporate profits."
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK and WILLIAM NEIKIRK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Since taking over for Alan Greenspan Feb. 1, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke has had a rocky time, and it could get rockier. The prices of oil and gasoline have surged, driving up inflation expectations even as he raised interest rates to counter them. A softening of housing prices has raised concerns about a bust and potential economic slowdown. The dollar is beginning to show weakness again and could cause more inflation if it goes into a sharp decline. There is even loose talk of a return of "stagflation," with inflation and slow growth coexisting.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
When his parents refused to send him to college, Tavis Smiley showed up at Indiana University anyway, eventually talking his way into a place in class and a work-study program to help pay for it. Denied an internship in the office of then-Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, he pleaded his case in what he acknowledges was a "tear-stained" letter to the mayor - and got his internship. Fired from his job as interview-show host on BET, he quickly turned around and landed programs on PBS, NPR and a handful of other media outlets, extending both his reach and influence.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 2007
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- The nightmares that tormented Sgt. Walter Padilla after returning home from Iraq in 2004 prompted extensive treatment by Army doctors, an honorable discharge from the military and a cocktail of medications to ease his suffering. But Padilla, 28, could not ward off memories of the people he had killed with a machine gun perched on his Bradley fighting vehicle. On April 1, according to the authorities and friends, he fatally shot himself in his Colorado Springs home.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM NEIKIRK and WILLIAM NEIKIRK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Since taking over for Alan Greenspan Feb. 1, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke has had a rocky time, and it could get rockier. The prices of oil and gasoline have surged, driving up inflation expectations even as he raised interest rates to counter them. A softening of housing prices has raised concerns about a bust and potential economic slowdown. The dollar is beginning to show weakness again and could cause more inflation if it goes into a sharp decline. There is even loose talk of a return of "stagflation," with inflation and slow growth coexisting.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 2006
NEW YORK -- Worries about inflation and another rise in interest rates prompted a sell-off on Wall Street yesterday the latest dip in a market that has experienced a high degree of volatility in the last few weeks. "The main thing that ails the stock market is uncertainty about the Fed and inflation," said Ethan Harris, chief U.S. economist for Lehman Brothers. "I think the stock market is beginning to figure out that inflation is becoming a danger. Where they pretty much ignored inflation for a long time, now it's becoming an issue."
BUSINESS
By DON LEE AND MARK MAGNIER and DON LEE AND MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2006
BEIJING -- Seeking to cool its runaway economy, China unexpectedly raised its major lending rate yesterday, sending ripples through global markets that have become increasingly dependent on the Asian nation's growth. Beijing's move to lift rates for the first time in 18 months pressured commodity prices amid traders' fears that demand from China would soften. The Middle Kingdom's voracious appetite for resources to support its rapid development has been a boon for producers, from copper miners in Chile to cotton farmers in California.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk | September 20, 2005
To pause or not to pause, that is the question facing the Federal Reserve today. For 10 straight meetings, Chairman Alan Greenspan's central bank has gradually increased short-term interest rates in a campaign to bring them back to a more "neutral," or normal, level. Another increase had been expected before Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the Gulf Coast - and sent gasoline prices soaring and consumer confidence sinking. But now, the Fed finds itself besieged by pressure to wait until its Nov. 1 meeting before boosting interest rates again.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | May 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Senior Federal Reserve officials confirmed yesterday that the central bank is poised to raise interest rates repeatedly in the months ahead, with some policy-makers embracing a controversial formula that could prompt them to call for rate increases whenever national unemployment falls below 6.5 percent.Now that the recovery is picking up speed and the economy is generating hundreds of thousands of new jobs each month, Fed officials say they are convinced that short-term interest rates must go considerably higher to prevent inflationary pressures from building.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Reserve's chairman, Alan Greenspan, appears to have been more reluctant than some of his colleagues to raise interest rates earlier this summer, judging from the notes of a meeting in July of top Fed officials.The central bank's top interest-rate policy panel voted at its July meeting to allow Mr. Greenspan to raise interest rates at his discretion during the following weeks rather than wait for the next meeting of the group, according to minutes of the meeting released yesterday.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -After the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, the Federal Reserve Board responded by slashing interest rates in a morale boost that spurred consumption. Since then, borrowing for both mortgages and consumer loans has soared to record highs amid a nationwide housing boom. Now the Fed's dilemma is this: Katrina might have slowed consumer spending, and another rate increase could compound that. But Katrina's spike in oil and gasoline prices also poses an inflationary risk that is usually countered through increases in the lending rate.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno and Tom Petruno,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
For the economy and financial markets, Hurricane Katrina may be remembered as a major tipping point. In the short term the storm may have tipped the Federal Reserve against further interest-rate increases, at least temporarily. It also may have convinced many consumers that energy prices aren't likely to come down much soon - which could have implications for how (and whether) they spend money in the near future and possibly beyond. Longer-term, Katrina could tip the scales on the nation's investment priorities, in favor of a greater focus on levees, bridges, roads and other infrastructure that have been allowed to deteriorate.
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