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Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
My neighbor is installing a rain garden. Won't that breed mosquitoes? Isn't it better for rain to run off quickly? Water must sit, unmoving, for three days for mosquitoes to have time to reproduce there. A rain garden empties before then, absorbing rainwater into the permeable soil, down to the roots of water-loving plants. Yes, rainwater must drain away from a home, but slowly is the operative word. Fast run-off can't be absorbed by your lawn or by your plants' roots, meaning the same plants may still need to be watered.
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Tim Wheeler | August 28, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup got a shot in the arm today (Tuesday, 8/28), as federal and nonprofit officials announced grants totaling $9.2 million for planting trees, restoring wetlands, installing rain gardens and other projects across the watershed. The announcement was made at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where one of the grants will help replace an existing parking lot with rain-absorbing "pervious concrete," intended to reduce polluted storm-water runoff.  The press conference was planned to highlight such urban water-quality efforts, with more than $800,000 in grants being handed out for projects in the Baltimore area alone.
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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Once, when heavy rain hit the roof of the Maryland Presbyterian Church in Towson, there was so much runoff that it would wash away the wood chips and soil that cover the children's play area. Today, the church on Providence Road uses rain barrels and a rain garden to help filter the water - and reduce the polluted runoff that eventually makes its way to the Chesapeake Bay. Maryland Presbyterian is one of many religious and nonprofit groups in Maryland that are trying to address that pollution, an effort that has grown more urgent now that they must pay the state's new stormwater management fee. The church's fee - dubbed "the rain tax" by critics - comes to about $1,000 a year.
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Tim Wheeler | May 4, 2012
The upcoming weekend is chock-full of green activities. Here are just some: Saturday is "Climate Impacts Day," meaning environmentalists intend to stage a flurry of demonstrations to get people to "connect the dots" between climate change and extreme weather. Folks will be donning gas masks to highlight their concerns during the "cyclovia" bike-walk from Roland Park to Druid Hill Park. Others will be kayaking amid the drowning wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, while still others plan to celebrate the installation of another solar array in Howard County.
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Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
If you create ponds and rain gardens to capture polluted runoff, will they work - and keep working?  A recent survey of storm-water control facilities put in along the Severn River in Anne Arundel County found that a third of them were in good condition, but more - 43 percent - were either in poor shape or couldn't be found at all. That's what 26 volunteers for the Severn River Association found earlier this month when they fanned out...
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By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
It's nothing fancy or elaborate. But supporters of two newly installed rain barrels at St. John's College in Annapolis say the contraptions can make a big difference in the health of nearby creeks and the Chesapeake Bay. That's why the St. John's Board of Friends and members of a student group called Project Politae installed two rain barrels on the college's campus on Wednesday, in hopes of encouraging the school's administration to install more of...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Once, when heavy rain hit the roof of the Maryland Presbyterian Church in Towson, there was so much runoff that it would wash away the wood chips and soil that cover the children's play area. Today, the church on Providence Road uses rain barrels and a rain garden to help filter the water - and reduce the polluted runoff that eventually makes its way to the Chesapeake Bay. Maryland Presbyterian is one of many religious and nonprofit groups in Maryland that are trying to address that pollution, an effort that has grown more urgent now that they must pay the state's new stormwater management fee. The church's fee - dubbed "the rain tax" by critics - comes to about $1,000 a year.
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Tim Wheeler | August 13, 2012
The costly struggle to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland may be harder than previously thought - because much of what's been done so far to control runoff has been misreported, allowed to deteriorate - or perhaps never even done. That's the upshot of a new survey by Owings Mills environmental consultant Richard Klein. Of 175 storm-water retention ponds, rain gardens and other "best management practices" for capturing runoff that he checked out in Baltimore city and nine of Maryland's largest counties, Klein found that 40 percent of them were either misidentified or impossible to find at all. Klein, founder and head of Community & Environmental Defense Services , relied for his survey on " StormPrint ," a computerized data base of storm-water controls that's been developed by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
June 11, 2010
Sunday, June 13 Arts and crafts festival More than 200 vendors will offer paintings, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, leather goods and more at the Annapolis Arts & Crafts Festival at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. There will also be wine and food catered by Bo Brooks and live acoustic, salsa, jazz, calypso, samba and reggae music. Children's activities will be provided by the Chesapeake Children's Museum. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $8, $6 for ages 12-18 and 65 and older.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A sprawling paint factory in industrial South Baltimore might be the last place you'd expect to attract hummingbirds. But Sherwin-Williams might now start drawing nectar-loving birds and more with native wildflowers, American beautyberry and pine trees it's planting at its manufacturing complex on Hollins Ferry Road. The effort is aimed at creating a more pleasant workplace, enhancing the neighborhood and helping clean up the harbor. Sherwin-Williams is one of a handful of companies - some with checkered environmental records - that have signed on to spruce up their properties, part of a new initiative to enlist businesses, nonprofits and government agencies there in helping to boost the city's anemic tree canopy, attract more wildlife and restore its degraded urban waters.
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Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 28, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay cleanup got a shot in the arm today (Tuesday, 8/28), as federal and nonprofit officials announced grants totaling $9.2 million for planting trees, restoring wetlands, installing rain gardens and other projects across the watershed. The announcement was made at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, where one of the grants will help replace an existing parking lot with rain-absorbing "pervious concrete," intended to reduce polluted storm-water runoff.  The press conference was planned to highlight such urban water-quality efforts, with more than $800,000 in grants being handed out for projects in the Baltimore area alone.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 13, 2012
The costly struggle to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland may be harder than previously thought - because much of what's been done so far to control runoff has been misreported, allowed to deteriorate - or perhaps never even done. That's the upshot of a new survey by Owings Mills environmental consultant Richard Klein. Of 175 storm-water retention ponds, rain gardens and other "best management practices" for capturing runoff that he checked out in Baltimore city and nine of Maryland's largest counties, Klein found that 40 percent of them were either misidentified or impossible to find at all. Klein, founder and head of Community & Environmental Defense Services , relied for his survey on " StormPrint ," a computerized data base of storm-water controls that's been developed by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
If you create ponds and rain gardens to capture polluted runoff, will they work - and keep working?  A recent survey of storm-water control facilities put in along the Severn River in Anne Arundel County found that a third of them were in good condition, but more - 43 percent - were either in poor shape or couldn't be found at all. That's what 26 volunteers for the Severn River Association found earlier this month when they fanned out...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 4, 2012
The upcoming weekend is chock-full of green activities. Here are just some: Saturday is "Climate Impacts Day," meaning environmentalists intend to stage a flurry of demonstrations to get people to "connect the dots" between climate change and extreme weather. Folks will be donning gas masks to highlight their concerns during the "cyclovia" bike-walk from Roland Park to Druid Hill Park. Others will be kayaking amid the drowning wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, while still others plan to celebrate the installation of another solar array in Howard County.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A sprawling paint factory in industrial South Baltimore might be the last place you'd expect to attract hummingbirds. But Sherwin-Williams might now start drawing nectar-loving birds and more with native wildflowers, American beautyberry and pine trees it's planting at its manufacturing complex on Hollins Ferry Road. The effort is aimed at creating a more pleasant workplace, enhancing the neighborhood and helping clean up the harbor. Sherwin-Williams is one of a handful of companies - some with checkered environmental records - that have signed on to spruce up their properties, part of a new initiative to enlist businesses, nonprofits and government agencies there in helping to boost the city's anemic tree canopy, attract more wildlife and restore its degraded urban waters.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
NEWS
June 11, 2010
Sunday, June 13 Arts and crafts festival More than 200 vendors will offer paintings, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, leather goods and more at the Annapolis Arts & Crafts Festival at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium. There will also be wine and food catered by Bo Brooks and live acoustic, salsa, jazz, calypso, samba and reggae music. Children's activities will be provided by the Chesapeake Children's Museum. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $8, $6 for ages 12-18 and 65 and older.
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