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September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
My neighbor is installing a rain garden. Won't that breed mosquitoes? Isn't it better for rain to run off quickly? Water must sit, unmoving, for three days for mosquitoes to have time to reproduce there. A rain garden empties before then, absorbing rainwater into the permeable soil, down to the roots of water-loving plants. Yes, rainwater must drain away from a home, but slowly is the operative word. Fast run-off can't be absorbed by your lawn or by your plants' roots, meaning the same plants may still need to be watered.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2010
Over here, reddish-bronze flowers of a little columbine nod in the breeze. And over there, a scrawny azalea is sprouting new leaves. They are among plants in a new student-built rain garden at Brooklyn Park Middle School, an eighth-grade project that entwined everything from English and science classroom studies to service learning hours and getting dirty outside. "One of the main ways you can conserve water is by having a rain garden," said 13-year-old Octavia James, pointing out aspects of the garden that will be dedicated in a ceremony Tuesday at the Anne Arundel County public school.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Gardeners attack the spring with energy and enthusiasm, adding lots of color, bulbs, perennials, flowering trees and shrubs. We wilt in the summer heat, and by fall we barely have the spirit for a pot of mums. Winter, we think, is for catalogs by the fire. It's also when you stop working in the garden and just think about it. Not so for Christine Killian of Annapolis and Alice Ryan of Easton. Both gardeners have made it a point to create winter interest in their gardens, if for no other reason than they want something lovely to look at from the warmth of the house.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
My neighbor is installing a rain garden. Won't that breed mosquitoes? Isn't it better for rain to run off quickly? Water must sit, unmoving, for three days for mosquitoes to have time to reproduce there. A rain garden empties before then, absorbing rainwater into the permeable soil, down to the roots of water-loving plants. Yes, rainwater must drain away from a home, but slowly is the operative word. Fast run-off can't be absorbed by your lawn or by your plants' roots, meaning the same plants may still need to be watered.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
LARRY COFFMAN has promised to change forever the way I look at development, so it's underwhelming when he pulls into exhibit A, an old IHOP in Bladensburg. Amid its asphalt and brick surrounds of highways, strip malls and parking lots, the pancake house features a single, smallish island of greenery to one side, maybe 60 feet by 20. But the little outpost of nature, with its shrubs, lush grass and native wildflowers, is far more than a belated nod to landscaping, Coffman explains. It is a "bio-retention cell," or "rain garden" -- an example of how development might proceed around the Chesapeake Bay without its current, guaranteed degradation of adjoining waterways.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A ton of tent caterpillars just ate the leaves on my tree. The branches are too high for us to cut off. Will the tree die? Your tree should be fine. The fall webworm, a caterpillar of our native tiger moth, has two generations a year. The spring population is largely unnoticed, but the late summer-fall one is bigger — and this year it was record-setting. Their webs differ from tent caterpillars because tent caterpillars build in tree crotches (in spring only), whereas webworms build nests at branch tips.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Gardeners attack the spring with energy and enthusiasm, adding lots of color, bulbs, perennials, flowering trees and shrubs. We wilt in the summer heat, and by fall we barely have the spirit for a pot of mums. Winter, we think, is for catalogs by the fire. It's also when you stop working in the garden and just think about it. Not so for Christine Killian of Annapolis and Alice Ryan of Easton. Both gardeners have made it a point to create winter interest in their gardens, if for no other reason than they want something lovely to look at from the warmth of the house.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | May 5, 2007
Our yard is red clay over white clay. Rain just sits there. If I till in organic matter and lay sod, would that solve the problem? Chances are you'll have difficulty maintaining a lawn until you solve the drainage problem. A grade of 1/2 inch per 50 feet would carry rain off your lot, but a better solution is to divert rain to a rain garden. Rain-garden plants thrive on periodic flooding, while rain slowly percolates into the soil. The Prince George's County Department of Environmental Resources has a good brochure called "Rain Gardens: The Natural Solution."
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A ton of tent caterpillars just ate the leaves on my tree. The branches are too high for us to cut off. Will the tree die? Your tree should be fine. The fall webworm, a caterpillar of our native tiger moth, has two generations a year. The spring population is largely unnoticed, but the late summer-fall one is bigger — and this year it was record-setting. Their webs differ from tent caterpillars because tent caterpillars build in tree crotches (in spring only), whereas webworms build nests at branch tips.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2010
Over here, reddish-bronze flowers of a little columbine nod in the breeze. And over there, a scrawny azalea is sprouting new leaves. They are among plants in a new student-built rain garden at Brooklyn Park Middle School, an eighth-grade project that entwined everything from English and science classroom studies to service learning hours and getting dirty outside. "One of the main ways you can conserve water is by having a rain garden," said 13-year-old Octavia James, pointing out aspects of the garden that will be dedicated in a ceremony Tuesday at the Anne Arundel County public school.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Fourth-grader Corey Brooks dipped the small white strip of test paper into the glass vial of cloudy water taken from the school parking lot. "Look at all the sediment in the bottom," said one of his lab partners, Brady Meixsell. A few minutes later, the fourth-grader and his peers at Sandymount Elementary School in Finksburg had determined the water's nitrogen and pH levels, and reasoned that its lack of clarity would mean a drop in the production of algae and zooplankton, minute animal life that floats in water.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | May 5, 2007
Our yard is red clay over white clay. Rain just sits there. If I till in organic matter and lay sod, would that solve the problem? Chances are you'll have difficulty maintaining a lawn until you solve the drainage problem. A grade of 1/2 inch per 50 feet would carry rain off your lot, but a better solution is to divert rain to a rain garden. Rain-garden plants thrive on periodic flooding, while rain slowly percolates into the soil. The Prince George's County Department of Environmental Resources has a good brochure called "Rain Gardens: The Natural Solution."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Fourth-grader Corey Brooks dipped the small white strip of test paper into the glass vial of cloudy water taken from the school parking lot. "Look at all the sediment in the bottom," said one of his lab partners, Brady Meixsell. A few minutes later, the fourth-grader and his peers at Sandymount Elementary School in Finksburg had determined the water's nitrogen and pH levels, and reasoned that its lack of clarity would mean a drop in the production of algae and zooplankton, minute animal life that floats in water.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2004
So you looked out the window after a thunderstorm and saw water pooling in your lawn, not running off into the gutter. Did you tsk-tsk and resolve to fill the depression with topsoil first chance you got? Or did you see it as an invitation to install a rain garden? If you chose the rain garden, take a bow. Not only will you have an attractive landscape feature, but you'll be doing your bit to cut down on water pollution, slow the rate of stream flooding in developed areas, and replenish groundwater.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2004
So you looked out the window after a thunderstorm and saw water pooling in your lawn, not running off into the gutter. Did you tsk-tsk and resolve to fill the depression with topsoil first chance you got? Or did you see it as an invitation to install a rain garden? If you chose the rain garden, take a bow. Not only will you have an attractive landscape feature, but you'll be doing your bit to cut down on water pollution, slow the rate of stream flooding in developed areas, and replenish groundwater.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
LARRY COFFMAN has promised to change forever the way I look at development, so it's underwhelming when he pulls into exhibit A, an old IHOP in Bladensburg. Amid its asphalt and brick surrounds of highways, strip malls and parking lots, the pancake house features a single, smallish island of greenery to one side, maybe 60 feet by 20. But the little outpost of nature, with its shrubs, lush grass and native wildflowers, is far more than a belated nod to landscaping, Coffman explains. It is a "bio-retention cell," or "rain garden" -- an example of how development might proceed around the Chesapeake Bay without its current, guaranteed degradation of adjoining waterways.
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