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By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2006
BEIJING -- Chinese railway authorities have launched an all-out attack on "yellow bulls" in and around their 5,700 train stations nationwide. While the term evokes some new strain of hoof-and-mouth disease, it is, in fact, a century-old Chinese term for ticket scalpers. "Even the cooks on our trains have been called to the front lines to fight yellow bulls," said Jiang Zhanlin, director of the Railway Ministry's police department. "We're prepared to fight as long as it takes." The Railway Ministry has announced an anti-yellow bull "Blue Shield Action" campaign, in and around Chinese New Year, the busiest holiday of the year, which begins tomorrow.
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NEWS
By Leo Bretholz | March 1, 2014
While it was many years ago, the horrific injustices I experienced during the Holocaust are seared in my brain. I can still recall in explicit detail the atrocities I saw as I was placed in a cattle car bound for a Nazi death camp and as I watched families being separated and possessions taken away. And I cannot forget who was responsible. The train company that tried to send me to Auschwitz was owned and operated by SNCF, a French company that still exists today. SNCF collaborated willingly with the Nazis and was paid per head and per kilometer to transport 76,000 innocent victims - including American pilots shot down over France as well as 11,000 children - across France to death camps like Auschwitz and Buchenwald.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
Paul D. Denton's new headquarters in Union Bridge will portray the same image he projects for his railway -- a Victorian romance of trains combined with the modern efficiency of a 1990s freight carrier.Construction on the Maryland Midland Railway's new 4,500-square-foot general office and crew headquarters should begin in June, Mr. Denton, president of the railroad, said at the Carroll County Economic Development Commission meeting yesterday."We wanted to have that Victorian exterior, but it will be all modern inside," he said.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2012
It is incredibly frustrating, not only to myself but to many residents of the Elkridge/Hanover area, that CSX claims to elicit public involvement in the site selection process (for a new railway facility) yet continues to refuse to release details on how they arrived at their cost estimates for each of the proposed sites. Cost estimates for the proposed sites are not the only concern surrounding this issue but, in my opinion, CSX is being brazenly deceptive at this early stage of the process and I have a deep concern that CSX will continue to operate as such, if not more so, as the process continues.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Maryland Midland Railway Inc. has closed part of its freight line after workers discovered a 40-foot by 12-foot sinkhole about 6 feet from its tracks behind McGregor Printing Corp. between Westminster and New Windsor.Work crews were scheduled to return today to begin filling the hole with crushed stone."It could have been dangerous if more of it [soil] had given way under the tracks," Maryland Midland President Paul D. Denton said.The hole was among the deepest sinkholes found recently in Carroll, county hydrogeologist Thomas Devilbiss said.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1998
Most motorists speeding along St. Paul Street probably haven't the faintest idea who that heroic bronze figure is, the one with the Prince Albert frock coat and Vandyke whiskers atop a granite pedestal staring at Mercy Hospital.Only the occasional pedestrian through Preston Gardens learns that this figure, in a grove of young crape myrtle trees, is that of John Mifflin Hood, railroad president and philanthropist. Its inscription hardly begins to tell the story of a man who helped rescue not only a business but a city.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service 8 | June 9, 1991
Those who have always wanted to play engineer on a speeding locomotive can realize their ambition, thanks to a five-day course offered by the Fairbourne and Barmouth Steam Railway in Wales.The privately run narrow-gauge steam railroad offers a five-day package course for about $680 that includes accommodations in a local hotel with breakfast and dinner. An intensive one-day course, with a guarantee that each student drives the engine the full three-mile length of the line, costs $85.Trainees learn how to run a steam locomotive, how one works, and safety regulations, an official says.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | April 9, 1992
BERLIN -- Herbert the Saw failed to cut train service in Germany yesterday, but police say they are still on their guard.Herbert, the pen name of a saw-wielding extortionist who wants $2.5 million or he will derail trains by cutting out sections of track, set yesterday as the deadline for the railway to agree to his terms.While the railway said it is ready to pay, police refuse to accept Herbert's plan for handing over the money by throwing it out of a train window in a suitcase.During an earlier attempt to give Herbert money, the suitcase hit an oncoming train and sent more than $1 million in deutsche-mark bills wafting through the north German countryside.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | April 5, 1992
BERLIN -- A man called Herbert the Saw, three derailed trains, a bombed-out luggage locker and a million dollars scattered in the air like confetti make up what police say is a bizarre but real threat to Germany's 2.8 million daily rail passengers.As police only now have made public, Herbert the Saw has been trying to blackmail the German railway for 18 months. But due to a series of odd developments, he hasn't received his money. He is still at large, holding the railway hostage and becoming the talk of the nation.
NEWS
April 27, 2004
Sykesville will highlight its heritage at a centennial celebration from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday along Main Street. Activities will include a parade, the dedication of the centennial fountain in Old Main Line Park, historical displays, walking tours, an appearance by town father James Sykes and school musical performances. Family events will include a dunking machine with town officials, games and model train displays. An evening event also will be held. Town centennial memorabilia will be available, featuring commemorative cups and a limited-edition print by Wiley Purkey.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver, The Washington Post | May 19, 2011
A company partly owned by the French railroad will have to detail the railway's role in transporting Holocaust victims to Nazi death camps before it can compete again to operate Maryland commuter trains, according to legislation that Gov. Martin O'Malley is scheduled to sign today. The law will make Maryland the first state to require that a company seeking government rail contracts provide all records about Nazi victims it transported and any personal belongings taken from them, supporters said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Questions of guilt and atonement that are usually the province of historians and moral philosophers arose in Annapolis during hearings Thursday on a bill that would hold a subsidiary of the French national railway responsible for the parent company's role in transporting deportees to death camps under Nazi occupation. Holocaust survivors and their relatives asked Maryland legislators to impose broad disclosure requirements on Keolis America, a Rockville-based company controlled by the French company SNCF, before it can compete for a contract to operate the MARC Camden and Brunswick lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
It's been about 50 years since smoke-blowing steam locomotives chugged along the rolling mountainside in Petersburg, W.Va. But this weekend, steam trains will be center stage at West Virginia Rails 2010, a festival that celebrates 100 years of a railway line carved into the Appalachian Mountains by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The event will feature two steam locomotives as well as several diesel trains, similar to those that traveled the rails of the state's pastoral Eastern Panhandle in the early 1900s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Clifford Cole Bruck Sr., a retired Western Maryland Railway executive and longtime opera buff, died Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. The longtime Guilford resident was 93. Mr. Bruck was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1932, he earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1936. Mr. Bruck also attended the University of Maryland School of Law at night, earning a degree in the 1960s.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 23, 2007
Maryland Midland Railway Inc., a 70-mile short-line railroad that primarily serves Lehigh Cement Co. in Carroll County, is being sold for about $29.1 million to Greenwich, Conn.-based Genesee & Wyoming Inc., operator of close to 50 short-line and regional freight railroads worldwide. Situated near the York Railway that Genesee & Wyoming already owns, Maryland Midland could eventually link up with that southeastern Pennsylvania line, executives from Maryland Midland and Lehigh, its biggest shareholder, said yesterday.
NEWS
October 19, 2007
Richard Edward Costello Sr., a retired sales manager for the old Western Maryland Railway, died of congestive heart failure Saturday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 84 and lived in Timonium. Born in Baltimore and raised on Linwood Avenue, he was a 1941 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School, where he played baseball and soccer. He served in the Navy in the Pacific during World War II aboard the USS Akutan, a ammunition transport vessel. After the war, he joined the Western Maryland Railway as a stenographer.
NEWS
By Jason E. Bruzdzinski | November 5, 1993
EARLIER this year, the Clinton administration proposed that the government spend $1.3 billion to research and develop the technology for a new high-speed rail system similar to Japan's shinkansen, or bullet train.More recently, the Department of Energy, Army Corps of Engineers and Federal Railroad Administration proposed a multi-billion-dollar system of 300-mph "maglev" passenger trains (trains that "float" along gravity-free fields created by magnetic opposition). The first leg of the system would run between Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Staff report | January 9, 1991
Buckle up those seat belts and drive down Route 75 to Union Bridge Sunday afternoon.Just as you enter town, direct your attention to the Western Maryland Railway Historical Society Museum, where you'll find an open house from 1 to 4 p.m.Leave your autos in the parking lot and step back into the heyday of railroad travel, when the train was the nation's king of transportation.The scale model railroad will be in operation, with layout depicting scenes from the railway's 130-year history. You can imagine riding the rails, viewing the miniature version of long ago life along the railway tracks.
NEWS
By The Yomiuri Shimbun | July 1, 2007
TOKYO -- The Japanese government plans to offer Shinkansen bullet train technology in assisting Russia's planned improvement to its national railway networks, including the Trans-Siberian Railway, government sources said. The Tokyo government will work out concrete details of the assistance program by autumn, establishing a working group of government officials and corporations from both countries, they said. By offering railway technology to Russia, the government hopes to expand business opportunities for Japanese firms in the rapidly emerging economy, the sources said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 22, 2007
WILMINGTON, Del. -- W.R. Grace & Co. asked the judge overseeing its bankruptcy case to bar asbestos-related lawsuits against Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Co. over the railroad's objections to the legal protection. Grace's effort to resolve more than 100,000 asbestos claims it faces would be more difficult if Burlington, known as BNSF, starts defending itself against 113 lawsuits involving the railroad's transportation of vermiculite ore in Libby, Mont., Grace attorney David M. Bernick contended yesterday in court.
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