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August 12, 1998
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Samuel F. Baxter, who had careers in the Army and later railroading, died Thursday of heart failure at Heartlands of Severna Park. He was 97. The son of Mason Baxter and Myrtelle Baxter, farmers, Samuel Ford Baxter was born in Sudlersville and later moved to Denton. After graduating in 1933 from Caroline High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1938 in business administration from Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College, where he was in the Army Reserve. Mr. Baxter worked in Baltimore as an accountant with General Chemical Co. In November 1941, he was ordered to active duty as a second lieutenant with the Army Quartermaster Corps.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
What I saw in the Ray and Janay Rice elevator tape was a man who was intoxicated and whose judgment was impaired ( "NFL investigation into Ray Rice video raises more questions ," Sept. 11). He was probably too drunk to lift his wife out of the elevator. Clearly, alcohol abuse can lead to domestic violence. But on the basis of one incident we do not strip a man of his humanity and throw the "domestic violence" playbook at him for all time. Relationships must be judged on an individual basis.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 12, 2007
The revival of railroads as a growth industry has barreled ahead during the past year on a newfound ability to raise prices. That has attracted the attention of many influential investors, including Warren E. Buffett, leading to a revival in several railroad stocks. It also represents a round trip in American history. Railroads had ushered in the modern stock era, with nine railroad stocks on an 11-stock Dow Jones index launched in 1884. The premier growth industry of that time, railroads were the only shares traded in large volume on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau of The Sun | April 28, 1991
New York--The chief executives of the three major railroads rolling through Baltimore dropped by New York during the past two weeks and gave similar reports on current conditions: The economy is still derailed.Railroads are in a good position to monitor business conditions since they tend to carry the bulk commodities that feed the factories that ultimately feed society. Their role at the beginning of the economic food chain is why some of the oldest theories of stock market timing are premised on movement in the Dow Jones transportation index (once entirely comprised of rail stocks)
BUSINESS
By The Wall Street Journal | May 31, 2008
A new CSX Corp. radio ad declares that even the most fuel-efficient hybrid car can't compete with a train, which "can move a ton of freight 423 miles on a single gallon of fuel." "Too bad we can't all drive a train," the announcer says before urging listeners to visit CSX's Web site to learn about the Jacksonville, Fla., company's "commitment to protecting the environment." Railroad companies, long a target of environmentalists who blame them for everything from deforestation to toxic spills, are marketing themselves as the ultimate eco-friendly, low-fuel-consuming industry.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court gave the federal government yesterday a major new mechanism for helping merged railroads cut their costs: the power to set aside workers' job-protection clauses in existing labor contracts.Ruling in cases involving two rail mergers -- one of them the linking of the Chessie System and the Seaboard Coast Line into CSX Transportation Inc. -- the court declared that the Interstate Commerce Commission may override railway union contracts if that is necessary to assure that an ICC-approved merger will succeed.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | May 14, 1995
Moving freight and passengers by rail is by far the cheapest and most efficient means possible and is friendlier to Earth's environment than any alternative form of transportation. Yet highways are not going to disappear and Americans are not going to forsake their cars and shippers their trucks for transport by rail.This is the focus of Stephen B. Goddard's "Getting There: The Epic Struggle Between Road and Rail in the American Century" (Basic Books, 351 pages. $28).What America needs is a balanced transportation system that employs the latest technology available.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Roy L. Barker, a retired Chessie System chief clerk and World War II veteran, died Sept. 2 at Oak Crest Village in Parkville of complications from a stroke. He was 91. The son of Murvin Barker, a city police officer, and Marie Barker, a homemaker, Roy Lyman Barker was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. After graduating in 1941 from City College, he went to work as a clerk for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He then joined the Army and trained with the 88th Glider Infantry in Sturgis, S.D. Mr. Barker then volunteered for parachute infantry school at Fort Benning, Ga. After completing jump school, he was assigned to the 515th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 13th Airborne Division.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The city of Baltimore and CSX Transportation have agreed to split the cost of rebuilding the one-block retaining wall that collapsed along East 26th Street in Charles Village, ending months of negotiations over who was responsible and how much taxpayers would cover. City officials said Monday they expect the collapse to cost taxpayers about $7.5 million - though the total could increase as construction continues - and CSX would pay the rest. The entire project is now expected to cost about $15 million, down from an initial estimate of $18.5 million.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
The Perryville Farmers Market is open every Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. at the corner of Broad Street and Roundhouse Drive in Lower Ferry Park; vendors are selling produce, crafts, baked goods and other wares. The Perryville Railroad Museum is open every Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Condolences are extended to the family of Margaret Cifaldo on her passing. The Perryville Fire Company will hold its fourth Sunday of the month all you can eat breakfast on Aug. 24. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. and the event runs through 11:30 a.m. Call 410-920-5079.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A freight train struck a garbage truck Tuesday morning at the same street-level railroad crossing in Rosedale where a similar collision 15 months ago resulted in a fiery explosion. The incident could have been far worse, considering what happened last year when the train derailed and the explosion caused widespread damage throughout the nearby industrial area. The CSX Transportation train remained on the tracks this time, and no one was injured in the crash at 8:15 a.m. near 68th Street and Lake Drive.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Amtrak trains were delayed for up to an hour Sunday evening after an old signal box along railroad tracks near the Howard Street bridge in North Baltimore caught fire, officials said. Firefighters put out the one-alarm fire, which was reported at 5:26 p.m., in roughly an hour, Baltimore Fire Department spokesman Ian Brennan said. Amtrak held train traffic from 5:28 p.m. until 6:10 p.m., and restricted trains to lower speeds until just before 7 p.m., to allow firefighters to safely respond, an Amtrak spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
CSX and Norfolk Southern Corp. are close to a deal that would end their four-month high-stakes battle and split Conrail's 11,000 miles of tracks.The latest arrangement calls for CSX to pay another $1 billion, or $10.5 billion total in cash, for Conrail, matching Norfolk Southern's hostile bid. Sources said that CSX, after acquiring Conrail, would sell about half of Conrail's lines in the Northeast to Norfolk Southern.Top executives of the three railroads have been meeting secretly for nearly six weeks to resolve the bidding.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
If they're lucky, most people have time to seriously immerse themselves in one or two interests during their lifetime, but that wasn't the case with Randolph Wakefield Chalfant, who died last week at 85. Chalfant - a retired Baltimore architect called Randy - had voluminous interests that he vigorously pursued despite ill health and failing eyesight until the end of his life. I knew his interest in architecture came from his father, a Pittsburgh architect. But I wondered how he had become fascinated with railroading, steam shipping, miniature theaters, marine engines, yachts and Christmas gardens.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The parents of two young women killed in a 2012 coal train derailment in Ellicott City criticized CSX Transportation for the first time Tuesday — blaming the railroad for their daughters' deaths. "The families and our attorneys are determined to hold CSX fully accountable," said Eric Nass, father of 19-year-old Elizabeth Nass, in a statement released by the law firm Baum Hedlund Aristei & Goldman, which specializes in rail disaster litigation nationwide. "Our daughters did not cause the derailment, CSX did," said Sue Nass, Elizabeth's mother, in the statement.
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