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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
Seven people received minor injuries Friday morning when two trains collided at low speed in the rail yard at Union Station in Washington, derailing five cars, Amtrak says. Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm said an Amtrak switching-yard locomotive, pulling the private Silver Foot passenger car and the Amtrak Dome Car, collided with a MARC Penn Line train shortly before 9:20 a.m. in the Washington rail yard. He said six Amtrak employees were taken to local hospitals with minor injuries while a passenger aboard the private car was injured but declined a trip to the hospital.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
While this week's decision to abandon the proposed $95 million intermodal rail facility at the Mount Clare yard in Southwest Baltimore may be regarded as a big victory for neighbors in Morrell Park and elsewhere who strongly opposed it, the decision is a genuine setback for efforts to expand business at the Port of Baltimore. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in recent years to make the port more competitive and reduce shipping costs; the loss of the planned intermodal facility is likely to have the opposite effect.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
Norfolk Southern Corp. is leaning toward building a $5 million rail yard adjacent to Dundalk Marine Terminal -- a move that would make the transfer of cargo between trains and ships more efficient and help make the struggling port of Baltimore more competitive.Improvements in the way containers are moved from one type of carrier to another are part of ongoing discussions concerning Norfolk Southern's and CSX's proposed split-up of the 11,000-mile Conrail system. Under a voluminous operating plan -- filed this week with federal regulators -- Norfolk Southern would take over all the rail lines operated by Conrail in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Driven by a surge of opposition from people who live in Southwest Baltimore, several city leaders have withdrawn support for a major CSX Transportation rail facility proposed for the area. Until recently, the project moved smoothly through early planning stages, after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake invited CSX to locate the facility - viewed as critical for the Port of Baltimore - in the city. City Councilman Edward Reisinger, who represents the Morrell Park neighborhood where the facility is proposed to go, said his position "evolved" after CSX officials showed what he characterized as a lack of respect for the community by failing to answer questions or address concerns.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1991
CSX Intermodal plans to close its rail yard in Alexandria, Va., and transfer its business to the state rail yard beside the Seagirt Marine Terminal in Baltimore.Maryland Port Administration officials say the move would cut trucking costs for the port's customers, add work for longshoremen who load and unload the trains, and increase revenues for the MPA, which gets a share of each load placed on the trains.Clarence W. Gooden, vice president and general manager of operations at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley, says he has meeting with MPA officials today to discuss details of the arrangement.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 20, 1991
CSX Intermodal and the Maryland Port Administration are trying to negotiate an agreement that would triple the number of trains using the port of Baltimore's Seagirt rail yard beginning early next year.CSX Intermodal Vice President Clarence W. Gooden said yesterday that the two sides have been negotiating and expect to meet on the issue again today. He said he doubted an agreement would be reached immediately.CSX would like to close its Potomac Yard in Alexandria, Va., and run the two daily trains that now originate there out of Baltimore instead.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | September 27, 1991
The truck pulling a dark green steamship line container came to a halt yesterday morning just inside the chain-link fence at the back of the CSX rail yard. Dockworker Robert Cook quickly checked the identification number of the container and sent the driver on his way.A few minutes later, the driver had delivered his container to the train and was headed back to the adjoining Seagirt Marine Terminal to pick up another box.The speed and efficiency of this operation is helping steamship lines provide better service to their customers in distant markets via the CSX rail system.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1991
CSX Intermodal announced yesterday that it will begin offering direct train service from Seagirt Marine Terminal to Cincinnati in January, which should help the port recapture some of the Midwestern markets it has lost in recent years.In addition to the new intermodal service to Cincinnati, CSXI also will move to Baltimore two north-south trains that had been using the CSX's Potomac Yard in Alexandria, Va. The two trains will link Baltimore with Atlanta and Tampa, Fla.Together, the changes will nearly quadruple the number of trains using the state-owned Seagirt rail yard.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | September 29, 1990
Conrail, one of two railroads serving the port of Baltimore, is exploring the possibility of re-establishing a direct ship-to-rail connection at Dundalk Marine Terminal.In the early 1980s, Conrail operated a railhead where cargo containers were moved directly between rail cars and the marine terminal. The elements of such a rail yard -- the tracks and adjacent storage area -- are still in place at Dundalk and could be used if Conrail decided to reopen a rail ramp there."Conrail has shown enough interest to have people look at it," Milton H. Miller Sr., a member of the Maryland Port Commission, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
A spokesman for CSX Transportation said the railroad expects to complete plans next month for a $90 million truck and train terminal in South Baltimore to serve port container traffic. As a result of meeting with civic leaders and public officials, CSX is revising its blueprint to place the terminal entrance on Bernard Drive, which serves an industrial park, to minimize impact on residential areas to the south and west, said CSX spokesman Robert Sullivan. The terminal, on the 70-acre Mount Clare rail yard in the Morrell Park neighborhood, will alleviate the bottleneck caused by the century-old Howard Street tunnel by allowing containers brought from the Port of Baltimore by truck and trains to be stacked two-high on outbound trains.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
A spokesman for CSX Transportation said the railroad expects to complete plans next month for a $90 million truck and train terminal in South Baltimore to serve port container traffic. As a result of meeting with civic leaders and public officials, CSX is revising its blueprint to place the terminal entrance on Bernard Drive, which serves an industrial park, to minimize impact on residential areas to the south and west, said CSX spokesman Robert Sullivan. The terminal, on the 70-acre Mount Clare rail yard in the Morrell Park neighborhood, will alleviate the bottleneck caused by the century-old Howard Street tunnel by allowing containers brought from the Port of Baltimore by truck and trains to be stacked two-high on outbound trains.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is urging CSX Transportation to find a site in the city for its multi-million dollar cargo transfer center rather than look for a site in suburbs to the south. In a letter to CSX President and CEO Michael J. Ward released Thursday, the mayor said she was "deeply troubled" that plans for the Baltimore-Washington Rail Intermodal Facility have stalled and expressed concern that if a new rail yard was not completed soon, "economic opportunity will pass us by. " The truck-to-rail center would allow CSX to bypass the narrow, century-old Howard Street tunnel beneath the city and double-stack containers trucked from the Port of Baltimore onto freight trains.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2010
Seven people received minor injuries Friday morning when two trains collided at low speed in the rail yard at Union Station in Washington, derailing five cars, Amtrak says. Amtrak spokesman Steve Kulm said an Amtrak switching-yard locomotive, pulling the private Silver Foot passenger car and the Amtrak Dome Car, collided with a MARC Penn Line train shortly before 9:20 a.m. in the Washington rail yard. He said six Amtrak employees were taken to local hospitals with minor injuries while a passenger aboard the private car was injured but declined a trip to the hospital.
NEWS
By Debbi Wilgoren and Lena H. Sun and Debbi Wilgoren and Lena H. Sun,The Washington Post | January 27, 2010
Two Metro workers were struck and killed early Tuesday by a large truck that was backing down the track just north of the Rockville station, officials said, deepening a crisis that has afflicted the transit agency for much of the past year. The fatal crash is the latest in a series of accidents that have led members of Congress to question the safety of Metro operations and prompted the Obama administration to call for federal control of safety regulation of subways and light rail systems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | May 3, 2008
Light rail riders have been getting to know each other a little more intimately over the past week as increased safety inspections have forced officials to run one-car, standing-room-only trains at rush hour and other times. Jawauna Greene, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Transit Administration, said yesterday that the agency has had to step up its inspections of its 53 light rail cars after a wheel on one cracked about a month ago. The MTA sent out an advisory late yesterday warning customers of possible delays and crowding as the light rail system operates with fewer cars than usual.
NEWS
March 6, 2005
Harry N. Hagy Sr., a retired Chessie System yard foreman who enjoyed helping his neighbors, died of heart failure Feb. 27 at his Mount Washington home. He was 77. Mr. Hagy was born in Baltimore and raised in Reading, Pa., where he graduated from high school. He served in the Navy during World War II. He began working for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in 1950. He held supervisory positions at the Mount Clare, Locust Point, Bayview and Curtis Bay rail yards, and retired in 1989. "During his entire 39-year career, he only missed one day of work, and that's because he had the flu," said his wife of 57 years, the former Dorothy Lugenbeel.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 17, 1993
NEW YORK -- For 12 excruciating days and nights, New York clothing executive Harvey Weinstein clung to life inside a tiny dark pit, 14 feet below a secluded rail yard in Upper Manhattan, where a band of kidnappers had left him to die.He survived by eating fruit, mostly bananas, that the kidnappers lowered to him until they received the requested ransom money.The one-time Marine lay in total darkness, his legs in shackles; at times, so were his arms.He made tape recordings at his captors' instruction, pleading with his children to pay a $3 million ransom.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2002
PORTLAND, Ore. - Just blocks from this city's center, a brand-new urban neighborhood is rising from bare ground once covered by Burlington Northern rail yards. The 34-acre Hoyt Street Yards development, still just a promise of what's to come, has sold out all five of its existing residential buildings, which have more than 500 units. Although much of the new River District, bordered to the north by the Willamette River, is still dirt, those who have bought there see a neighborhood in which the potential is obvious.
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