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NEWS
April 18, 1991
Eight thousand Maryland rail commuters, most bound for Baltimore or Washington, experienced firsthand the inconveniences of the national freight rail strike that began early yesterday morning. But their problems were minor compared with other rail-travelers' woes. Unions representing 250,000 workers vowed not to interfere with transit lines, but some management groups seem intent on adding to the disruption. Thus, cross-country trains moving east from the Pacific Coast were halted at Kansas City despite the unions' pledge.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 1999
A 50-year-old man died yesterday morning after he was struck by a light rail train while crossing a street in downtown Baltimore, police said.John Robert Hucks Jr. was struck about 8: 15 a.m. as he attempted to cross from the east side of the 100 block of S. Howard St., police said. Hucks suffered severe head injuries and died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, said Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes, a police spokeswoman.Witnesses told police that Hucks walked between two parked tractor-trailer trucks and then stepped onto the street, where he was hit by the northbound train.
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BUSINESS
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of thousands of stranded rail commuters. Plants shut down because parts aren't being delivered. Utilities low on coal.Suddenly, these scenes are real possibilities with the threat of a national rail strike on April 17.Although talks are continuing, every sign points to a strike."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1998
The effects of the worldwide financial collapse brought on by the "Panic of 1873" hadn't faded by 1877. Recovery was slow and the nation's railroads had been particularly hard hit, including the Baltimore & Ohio.Baltimore would soon be swept up into a bloody nationwide railroad strike, the first general strike in the nation's history. By the time it ended, 100 people were left dead and thousands were injured, while millions of dollars of railroad property lay in ruin.Early in the spring of 1877, Northern railroads began cutting salaries and wages, prompting a strike on the Philadelphia and Reading.
NEWS
April 16, 1991
In a perfect world, this would be a perfect time for a rail strike. Industry staffing rules aboard trains are archaic, despite a decade of cost-cutting. Rail companies seem flush, as union reports show, and they could pay more in exchange for the productivity improvements they desire. And both sides have grown overly comfortable with the Railway Labor Act, which requires Congress to step in to settle any dispute that grows too contentious. As the Journal of Commerce has observed, that limits the damage any strike is likely to cause while setting in stone contract terms rail managements like.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans yesterday to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
Some 8,000 Maryland rail commuters today were caught in a struggle between railway unions and management, who each blamed the other for the first nationwide rail strike in nearly 10 years.The unions had said their members would continue to work on passenger lines, but, locally, they were not given the chance.CSX Transportation, nervous over passenger safety and the reliability of service, called its engineers last night and told them that MARC trains on the Camden and Brunswick lines would not operate today.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
The looming railroad strike, which could start tomorrow, would hurt two important local manufacturing operations, company officials said.The companies -- Bethlehem Steel Corp. and General Motors Corp. -- are making contingency plans to bring in materials by other forms of transportation. However, both expect little disruption at their local factories if the strike lasts only a day or two.Other major companies, such as Westinghouse Electric Corp., McCormick & Co. Inc. and Armco Inc., primarily rely on trucks to supply materials and don't expect to be affected by any strike.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Sun Staff Correspondent Reporters Cindy Harper-Evans of The Sun's business staff and Doug Birch of the metropolitan staff contributed to this article | April 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Congress passed and sent to President Bush late last night legislation that would put an end to the nationwide strike by 200,000 rail workers.The president was awakened and signed the bill shortly after its arrival at the White House early this morning."By the time of the morning rush hour people will be back to work," Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner said. "It's remarkable we've been able to bring this to this point this quick."About 10:30 p.m., the full House passed the bill by a 400-5 vote.
NEWS
By THOMAS V. DiBACCO | September 4, 1994
If there is anything ironic about a national Labor Day, 100 years old this year, it is that unions and railroads, the protagonists whose battles gave rise to a holiday to placate workers, play much smaller parts on the contemporary economic stage.To be sure, last week President Clinton ordered a suspension of the 6-week-old strike against the Soo Line Railroad, and Congress two years ago had to halt a nationwide rail strike. But labor unions rarely resort to strikes these days, and railroad whistles are the faintest of the transportation sounds.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans yesterday to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
If the nnationwide rail strike comes to full bloom at midnight and shuts down the one commuter line operating through Maryland, Gov. William Donald Schaefer advises riders to take the bus.In fact, Mr. Schaefer and transportation officials say the state has about 50 buses ready to roll early tomorrow morning and is looking for more to handle about 8,000 travelers who commute, mostly to Washington, to work.Those buses, a spokesman for Mr. Schaefer said today, will be escorted by state police cruisers "so the buses can reach their destinations in a timely fashion."
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Most Maryland manufacturers were making do with warehoused supplies during the first day of a nationwide rail strike yesterday. But some business people warned that unless the trains started moving again soon, layoffs and shutdowns would follow.In addition, many managers started making plans to shift their freight to trucks or barges -- potentially increasing the costs of transporting their goods, but also creating a boon for the trucking industry.Harris LeFew, spokesman for the Westvaco Corp.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Peter Jensen and Joe Nawrozki and Peter Jensen,Staff Writers Staff writers Peter Hermann and Sherrie Ruhl contributed to this report | June 24, 1992
Maryland transportation officials were adequately prepared to get rail commuters to work today as freight railroads shut down coast-to-coast today and Amtrak stopped passenger service everywhere except in the Boston-to-Washington corridor.Luck and well-laid plans were parts of the local picture in wake of one union's strike against a single freight line, CSX.And part was the result of commuters taking things into their own hands.Maryland's only one of three commuter lines able to operate because of the strike was MARC's Penn Line from Perryville in Cecil County through Baltimore to Washington, D.C.The Camden and Brunswick rail commuter lines were shut down.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
The looming railroad strike, which could start tomorrow, would hurt two important local manufacturing operations, company officials said.The companies -- Bethlehem Steel Corp. and General Motors Corp. -- are making contingency plans to bring in materials by other forms of transportation. However, both expect little disruption at their local factories if the strike lasts only a day or two.Other major companies, such as Westinghouse Electric Corp., McCormick & Co. Inc. and Armco Inc., primarily rely on trucks to supply materials and don't expect to be affected by any strike.
BUSINESS
By Evening Sun Staff | April 11, 1991
A nationwide railroad strike that could take place next week might hurt the Port of Baltimore, which is struggling to make a comeback after a poor 1990, said Brendan W. "Bud" O'Malley, port director.O'Malley said that if a rail strike does occur, truckers will move in to carry cargo to and from the port. Trucks, however, would be more expensive than rail service, creating hardship for customers moving freight through the port. About 25 to 30 percent of the cargo going through the port travels by rail, he said.
NEWS
By John H. Gormley Jr | April 16, 1991
Hopes of averting a nationwide rail strike dwindled yesterday, and the nation's biggest freight railroads and their unions said they saw little chance of reaching agreement by the strike deadline of midnight tonight.Two of the 10 rail unions reached tentative contract accords last week, and agreement with a third union, the American Train Dispatchers Association, was announced yesterday. But that leaves only one day of talks to reach an understanding with the other seven, an achievement both sides suspect is just about out of reach.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
The looming railroad strike, which could start tomorrow, would hurt two important local manufacturing operations, company officials say.The companies -- Bethlehem Steel Corp. and General Motors Corp. -- are making contingency plans to bring in materials by other forms of transportation. However, both expect little disruption at their local factories if the strike lasts only a day or two.Other major companies, such as Westinghouse Electric Corp., McCormick & Co. Inc. and Armco Inc., primarily rely on trucks to supply materials and don't expect to be affected by any strike.
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