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The Baltmore Sun | October 30, 2012
Travel restrictions on Baltimore City roads were lifted at noon, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. Maryland State Police are urging people to stay off roads until highway crews are able to clear away fallen trees and other traffic hazards. They warn that downed power lines and wind-blown debris are blocking roads around the state. In addition, they say, power failures have caused traffic lights to go out around the region. In Garrett County, portions of I-68 were closed due to blizzard conditions.
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NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | November 16, 2008
Light rail service has been discontinued indefinitely between the North Avenue and Hunt Valley stations because a large number of trains are out of service for wheel maintenance, the Maryland Transit Administration has announced. The disruption in service began yesterday. The Penn Station-Camden Station shuttle trains also will not be in service, the MTA announced Friday. Bus service will be provided between the discontinued stops. Single-car trains will serve commuters south of North Avenue, which could lead to crowding at the beginning of the week.
NEWS
February 1, 1994
Put light rail service where people want it and can reach it conveniently, and they will use it. That's the plain message of the most recent ridership survey on the Central Light Rail Line. Service was extended from downtown almost to Glen Burnie last June, and ridership more than doubled. In fact, the 18,000 daily riders represent more than half the number of riders anticipated by 2010 for the already completed base system.It's been easy for critics to carp at the use of the system, not yet two years old. Ridership built up slowly, and empty cars were frequent sights, particularly during non-peak hours.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | February 13, 1996
ONCE UPON a time, newspaper reporters waited patiently in drafty stations to see and record who was coming and who was going on the railroad's crack trains. It was considered legitimate news during the belle epoque of rail travel that celebrated in addition to flesh and fame, steam, steel and speed.The names of the fast limiteds -- the Capitol Limited, the Black Diamond, the Seminole, the Liberty Limited, the State of Maine, the Spirit of St. Louis, the Royal Blue -- managed to etch themselves into the psyche and fabric of American life.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 25, 2010
I was not on the "hell train" that stalled outside Washington this week, but as one who has ridden the state-run transportation system since the day it took over from the old Baltimore Transit Co., I have a few tart observations. In those decades, I watched nearly all my peers abandon city public transit. The line that I began riding in 1959, which once had buses about every 15 minutes in the morning, has been slashed to seven morning trips a day. There is no weekend service. The on-time reliability of Baltimore's buses is shaky, although I have noticed some improvement in the past few months.
NEWS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1993
With little left but elbow room in the packed Aberdeen railroad depot, city residents, train buffs and state officials officially celebrated the reopening of Aberdeen's historic train station Sunday.All but hidden behind Aberdeen's pedestrian and vehicle overpass at U.S. 40 and East Bel Air Avenue, the old station had been vandalized and burned. It seemed forgotten, even by conductors who knew it only as a blur they passed on their way to other stops.With little left to work with but the old station's frame and its wide wooden benches, workers gave it a new roof, windows and ticket office.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 2, 2001
In Baltimore County Man uses bomb threat to rob Allfirst bank in Hunt Valley Mall HUNT VALLEY -- A man who claimed to be carrying a bomb robbed an Allfirst Bank at the Hunt Valley Mall of an unknown amount of money yesterday morning. The man entered the bank on Shawan Road about 11:30 a.m. and told a teller that he had a bomb in his shopping bag and would set off unless the teller gave him cash, said Baltimore County Police Officer Norris McKee. Once the man was given money, he left on foot, leaving the bag at the bank, McKee said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
From an ambitious plan to more than double rail service in the Baltimore region over the next 40 years, two major projects have emerged as priorities. An advisory committee, which approved the overall plan yesterday, urged the state to move forward with an east-west rail line between Fells Point and the Social Security Administration in Woodlawn. In addition, it recommended an extension of the current subway system, taking it north from Johns Hopkins Hospital to Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | December 15, 1994
A three-alarm fire burned out a vacant building in downtown Baltimore this morning, slowing rush-hour traffic and halting service on the light rail line between the North Avenue and Westport stops.The fire started before 5:45 a.m. in an abandoned building, formerly known as the Backstage Cafe & Cafeteria, in the 200 block of W. Clay St., fire officials said. It quickly went to three alarms, bringing 30 fire engines and nearly 100 firefighters to the scene, the officials said.The building is around the corner from Howard Street and the light rail's tracks.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
The Northeast may be home to the most successful passenger rail system in the U.S., but it pales in comparison to its brethren in Europe and Japan. With highways and airports in the region likely to have capacity issues and greenhouse gas emissions an alarming problem for a nation that is so car-dependent, the need to upgrade the Northeast corridor is clear enough. But before U.S. travelers can contemplate futuristic 300 mile per hour magnetic levitation trains or even the 150-200 mph trains found elsewhere, Amtrak and commuter rail systems between Maryland and Maine need something more basic: better reliability and capacity.
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