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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
The Howard County Board of Education on Tuesday approved a new site to be considered for construction of an elementary school in Elkridge, giving an alternative to a previously proposed site that raised concerns about proximity to a MARC rail commuter line and a proposed CSX rail cargo transfer station. The new site, on Ducketts Lane adjacent to U.S. 1, is 10.1 acres and will include space for a ball field and multipurpose field. Howard school officials said a permit is required from the state Department of the Environment and the Army Corps of Engineers to fill in wetlands.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, THE BALTIMORE SUN | May 5, 2011
The Maryland Transit Administration will hold four open houses this month for area residents to share their views about designs for the 20 light rail stations planned along the east-west Red Line. The first meeting is scheduled for Saturday at Edmondson High School. At the open houses, members of the Red Line Station Area Advisory Committee will display results of their work over the past six months. According to the MTA, 250 community "stakeholders" have been participating in discussions aimed at planning locations, designs, access, development implications and other matters relating to stations along the 14-mile line from Woodlawn to Bayview.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
State transportation officials have narrowed their list of potential sites for a $150 million truck-to-rail CSX container transfer facility along the main Camden rail line from 12 to four finalists, including two in Howard, one in Anne Arundel and one in Prince George's counties. One of the four sites is stirring controversy because its location — at Hanover and Race roads in Elkridge — is near a potential site for a much-needed new elementary school. The school, if built, would sit next to Coca Cola Drive in a planned 1,000-apartment, mixed-use development called Oxford Square, on the north side of Route 100 near the Dorsey commuter train station.
NEWS
By Katherine Shaver, The Washington Post | January 12, 2011
Ed Dabolt hopes any Purple Line station near his Hyattsville neighborhood will be modern and inviting. Chevy Chase residents want a bridge to allow children, joggers and cyclists to safely cross new tracks, and the University of Maryland is pushing for a train tunnel beneath its College Park campus. As the Maryland Transit Administration analyzes a proposed light rail line between Bethesda and New Carrollton, the focus is narrowing from the larger vision to the nitty-gritty details: where stations should be, what kind of landscaping and sound walls are needed, and how pedestrians and vehicles should cross tracks.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
The O'Malley administration is proposing an infusion of almost $90 million for engineering of two new transit systems — including Baltimore's east-west Red Line — as part of an otherwise flat $9.4 billion transportation spending plan for the next six years. Unlike plans of the past two years, the 2011-2016 Consolidated Transportation Program is not a litany of recession-related deferrals of transportation expansion and maintenance projects. "The great news is we didn't have to cut. That's what I'd like to shout from the rooftops," Maryland Transportation Secretary Beverly Swaim-Staley said Monday.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A $65 million retail and housing development proposed to replace the Anderson Automotive dealership at Howard and 25th streets in Baltimore would benefit the surrounding area more if its design were not so inward-oriented, neighboring property owners told city planners Thursday. During the first presentation of plans for the project to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel, property owners from Remington and lower Charles Village said they would like the developers to consider saving a former church on 24th Street rather than razing it. City planning director Tom Stosur said he was excited about the project but urged the architects to do more to make the design as environmentally sensitive as possible.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Lorraine Mirabella and Larry Carson and Lorraine Mirabella,larry.carson@baltsun.com and Lorraine.Mirabella@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
A developer is planning Howard County's third urban-style mixed-use development along the MARC rail commuter line near Elkridge, a site long expected to be used for a Coca-Cola bottling plant. The 122-acre project, called Oxford Square, would include up to 1,400 apartments and condominiums, 1 million square feet of commercial space, retail stores, a hotel and possibly six acres for a school, mimicking similar proposals at the Savage and Laurel Park train stations farther south. The transit station projects have all been promoted as examples of Smart Growth - absorbing new residences and commercial development in areas already served by mass transit, roads, utilities and schools.
NEWS
April 29, 2009
Time to move ahead with light rail line Any time a worthy project comes along, there will be NIMBYs who oppose it, just as is now the case for the Red Line ("Canton organizing to oppose transit plan," April 26). But much of this opposition is based on ignorance. Some people don't want "trains" on Boston Street. But there is an enormous difference between a light rail vehicle and a 100-car coal train. People are also concerned about noise and vibration on the streets. Well, just stand at the corner of Howard and Lexington streets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
Once a gritty neighborhood on Southeast Baltimore's industrial waterfront, Canton has transformed itself into a model of urban chic where million-dollar townhouses overlook the harbor and destination night spots surround O'Donnell Square. But many residents of the resurgent community worry that the city's preferred route for an east-west transit line would cut off Canton from the water, drag down property values and compound the area's already serious traffic and parking problems. They're organizing to oppose the plan known as Alternative 4-C - which has powerful support and could well be chosen when the Maryland Transit Administration decides this summer.
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