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By Marina Sarris and Peter Jensen and Marina Sarris and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
ROCKVILLE -- Crew members on the MARC train that crashed last February in Silver Spring were not trained in how to help passengers in a disaster -- or even how to open emergency exits, federal investigators were told yesterday.Witnesses testifying before the National Transportation Safety Board did not speculate whether such training might have saved the 11 people who died in the wreck -- most after being trapped inside the fiery Maryland Rail Commuter service train.But the board's chairman urged the rail industry to begin teaching its crews about emergency evacuation procedures, even though it is not required by federal law."
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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
Thousands more people may soon be working on the railroad. With the economy picking up and an increasing demand for freight transportation, rail businesses plan to hire more than 80,000 workers over the next six years, according to the Association of American Railroads. But finding enough qualified people for the positions could be challenging, experts said, because the work is physically demanding. "Railroads are experiencing, for the first time in modern history, significant shifts from the highway to the rails because of highway congestion, higher fuel prices and difficulty among trucking companies to attract and retain drivers," said Frank Wilner, a spokesman for the United Transportation Union, which represents about 50,000 rail workers.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | May 14, 1995
Moving freight and passengers by rail is by far the cheapest and most efficient means possible and is friendlier to Earth's environment than any alternative form of transportation. Yet highways are not going to disappear and Americans are not going to forsake their cars and shippers their trucks for transport by rail.This is the focus of Stephen B. Goddard's "Getting There: The Epic Struggle Between Road and Rail in the American Century" (Basic Books, 351 pages. $28).What America needs is a balanced transportation system that employs the latest technology available.
NEWS
June 16, 1997
Private industry can afford to be charitableIt was thought-provoking to see these two headlines on the same page on June 10: ''Microsoft to invest $1 billion in Comcast Corp.,'' and, ''$1.5 billion for Medicare too much, House GOP says.''Private industry invests in improving our entertainment, and government says ''too much'' to help low-income elderly people pay higher Medicare premiums. Perhaps this is an indication that private industry could be more charitable to public needs.Lynda BrownColumbiaAdvantages of rail over trucks overstatedStephen J.K. Walters supplied a thoughtful commentary ("Get the port back on track," June 10)
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
A much-overdue full-length history has finally been written of the Washington Baltimore & Annapolis Electric Railroad, which once conveyed travelers and commuters from the ferry wharf in Annapolis to Camden Station or its downtown terminal in Washington at speeds approaching 70 mph. It's a story not only of the past, but of this area's present and future, for before there was light rail in Baltimore, there was the W.B.& A.As related by John Merriken, a...
NEWS
June 16, 1997
Private industry can afford to be charitableIt was thought-provoking to see these two headlines on the same page on June 10: ''Microsoft to invest $1 billion in Comcast Corp.,'' and, ''$1.5 billion for Medicare too much, House GOP says.''Private industry invests in improving our entertainment, and government says ''too much'' to help low-income elderly people pay higher Medicare premiums. Perhaps this is an indication that private industry could be more charitable to public needs.Lynda BrownColumbiaAdvantages of rail over trucks overstatedStephen J.K. Walters supplied a thoughtful commentary ("Get the port back on track," June 10)
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
Thousands more people may soon be working on the railroad. With the economy picking up and an increasing demand for freight transportation, rail businesses plan to hire more than 80,000 workers over the next six years, according to the Association of American Railroads. But finding enough qualified people for the positions could be challenging, experts said, because the work is physically demanding. "Railroads are experiencing, for the first time in modern history, significant shifts from the highway to the rails because of highway congestion, higher fuel prices and difficulty among trucking companies to attract and retain drivers," said Frank Wilner, a spokesman for the United Transportation Union, which represents about 50,000 rail workers.
NEWS
By Charles H. White Jr | April 19, 2007
Congress has at last recognized and moved to fix a gaping breach in America's homeland security: railroad and transit system security. Unfortunately, the Senate and House bills come with veto provocations. The Senate bill enacting much of the 9/11 commission's recommendations has a provision authorizing collective bargaining by aviation security workers. The House bill embraces whistleblower protections for employees involved in security projects. Both bills apparently are nonstarters in the White House's view.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Vaughn Shoemaker, 89, the editorial cartoonist who created the hapless taxpayer "John Q. Public," died of cancer Sunday in Carol Stream, Ill. Mr. Shoemaker won the Pulitzer Prize in 1938 and again in 1947 for his cartoons. During his career, Mr. Shoemaker was chief editorial cartoonist at the Chicago Daily News, the New York Herald Tribune and the Chicago American. His John Q. Public, a victim of taxes and stupid officials, has become a synonym for the average citizen.Harley O. Staggers, 84, credited with revamping the nation's rail industry during a 32-year career as a West Virginia congressman, died Tuesday at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
Kudos to Japan Rail and its promoters in the U.S. for their ingenuity and persistence in advancing the fortunes of magnetic levitation rail along the Northeast Corridor from Washington, D.C. to New York ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). As the project manager for past studies of Baltimore-Washington maglev feasibility for the federal and state transportation departments, I am convinced that 300 mile per hour rail service from Washington to Baltimore and ultimately on to New York will revolutionize travel along the Northeast and transform the recreational, business, tourist and commuter travel between Northeast cities.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Peter Jensen and Marina Sarris and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
ROCKVILLE -- Crew members on the MARC train that crashed last February in Silver Spring were not trained in how to help passengers in a disaster -- or even how to open emergency exits, federal investigators were told yesterday.Witnesses testifying before the National Transportation Safety Board did not speculate whether such training might have saved the 11 people who died in the wreck -- most after being trapped inside the fiery Maryland Rail Commuter service train.But the board's chairman urged the rail industry to begin teaching its crews about emergency evacuation procedures, even though it is not required by federal law."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | May 14, 1995
Moving freight and passengers by rail is by far the cheapest and most efficient means possible and is friendlier to Earth's environment than any alternative form of transportation. Yet highways are not going to disappear and Americans are not going to forsake their cars and shippers their trucks for transport by rail.This is the focus of Stephen B. Goddard's "Getting There: The Epic Struggle Between Road and Rail in the American Century" (Basic Books, 351 pages. $28).What America needs is a balanced transportation system that employs the latest technology available.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
A much-overdue full-length history has finally been written of the Washington Baltimore & Annapolis Electric Railroad, which once conveyed travelers and commuters from the ferry wharf in Annapolis to Camden Station or its downtown terminal in Washington at speeds approaching 70 mph. It's a story not only of the past, but of this area's present and future, for before there was light rail in Baltimore, there was the W.B.& A.As related by John Merriken, a...
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
Restructuring and other charges recorded in the fourth quarter left financially troubled RailWorks Corp. with a quarterly loss of $19.8 million, or $1.29 per share, compared with $6.6 million, or 43 cents a share, in the corresponding quarter the year before, the company reported yesterday. The charges amounted to $15.3 million, or $1 a share, at the Baltimore County company that provides rail industry products and services. Revenue for the quarter that ended Dec. 31 was $170.1 million, up 19 percent from the corresponding quarter in 1999, when revenue was $142.
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