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Raggedy Ann

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NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
IN 1932, AN aspiring actor made his way to Hollywood. He secured an audition at RKO Studios. The director wasn't very impressed, and he wrote in his report that the actor "can't sing, can't act. Balding. Can dance a little." Despite the review, the studio heads decided to give Fred Astaire a chance and offered him a role in the Joan Crawford-Clark Gable film Dancing Lady. The rest, as they say, is history. Local would-be actors looking for their big break could get it this week. Director Starr Lucas of the Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts will be auditioning adults and children ages 7 and older for a production of Patricia Thackray's Raggedy Ann and Andy.
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FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2006
Bruce Drinkwater, a big guy in jeans and a battered fleece pullover, sidles up to the manager of the Spirit Halloween Superstore with the gruff yet familiar air of a man ready to talk football. Instead he grunts: "Have any more angel costumes?" And then hastily adds: "In her size." She is Nicole, his 11-year-old daughter, and she's standing beside him, sparkling with excitement (and maybe a smidgen of glitter rubbed off from a nearby princess outfit). Her parents don't spring for trick-or-treating gear every October because often as not there's a dance-recital dress or past year's costume that she can wear just as well as something new. Lately, though, Nicole has grown so fast -- about an inch every six months, according to the pencil lines that rise like ladder rungs on the kitchen wall of their Timonium home -- that there's no way that the Raggedy Ann costume will fit again, nor will the footie pajamas she wore the time she dressed up as a baby.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | February 10, 2002
What does Barbie have that Raggedy Ann doesn't? Besides the hourglass figure and all those accessories? How cuddly is a Tonka truck? Has anyone ever written the adventures of the Hula Hoop? The shocking fact is that all of these toys have what the beloved rag doll does not: A place in the National Toy Hall of Fame. "We love all toys, including Raggedy Ann," said Kim Baldwin, spokeswoman for the Hall of Fame in Salem, Oregon. "The fact is, she just hasn't made the cut." Raggedy Ann fans are out to remedy this injustice with a grassroots petition drive to influence the voting of the 100 mysterious selectors who, each year since 1998, have decided which toys make it into the Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2003
In the light-filled atrium of Columbia's Long Reach High School, 8-year-old Jordan Baruch twirled 10 Hula-Hoops for 4 1/2 seconds as a disc jockey spun Jewish music. After jumping on the Moon Bounce, 6-year-old Jacob Lozinsky - dressed in a karate jacket - busily decorated a noisemaker. Meredith Grossman, 7, waited at the face-painting booth for her purple unicorn. In an adjacent room, volunteer Caitlin Pomerantz - aka Raggedy Ann - explained the rules of "Queen Esther's Tightrope Walk" with mother, Lisa, as families ate kosher pizza and cotton candy.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2006
Bruce Drinkwater, a big guy in jeans and a battered fleece pullover, sidles up to the manager of the Spirit Halloween Superstore with the gruff yet familiar air of a man ready to talk football. Instead he grunts: "Have any more angel costumes?" And then hastily adds: "In her size." She is Nicole, his 11-year-old daughter, and she's standing beside him, sparkling with excitement (and maybe a smidgen of glitter rubbed off from a nearby princess outfit). Her parents don't spring for trick-or-treating gear every October because often as not there's a dance-recital dress or past year's costume that she can wear just as well as something new. Lately, though, Nicole has grown so fast -- about an inch every six months, according to the pencil lines that rise like ladder rungs on the kitchen wall of their Timonium home -- that there's no way that the Raggedy Ann costume will fit again, nor will the footie pajamas she wore the time she dressed up as a baby.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | September 4, 1994
Q: I have an extensive collection of Disneyana that includes original cels, plates and limited editions. How do I go about reaching Disney collectors?A: Collectors interested in selling their collections should refer to "Collector's Information Clearinghouse, Antiques & Collectibles Resource Directory" by David Maloney.Q: I have a Raggedy Ann doll that I was given around 1967. She is wearing her original clothes. A label that says "Knickerbocker" is attached to her. Could you tell me her value?
FEATURES
By Tricia Eller | January 26, 2000
Does your mouth water when Raggedy Ann and Andy pull taffy or when Laura Ingalls Wilder describes the fresh, hot baked-goods her mother made? You can bring these characters and their tempting treats to life using cookbooks designed for kids and centered on the plots of some of their favorite stories. Such cookbooks teach children that reading is fun and has a purpose. Kay Vandergrift, a professor of children's literature at Rutgers University, has compiled a list of cookbooks developed from stories, many that go back to your own days of childhood.
NEWS
June 29, 1992
Hank Williams Jr.leaves in a huffAn apparently intoxicated Hank Williams Jr. swore at his audience and walked off stage after stumbling through parts of four songs in Bonner Springs, Kan., Saturday night.Some people at the abbreviated show demanded ticket refunds. And some threw beer cups and other objects after the country singer left the stage, said Graham Phillips, secretary for Sandstone Amphitheatre."He was a little bit drunk, you might say," Mr. Phillips said. "He started calling people names.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
IN THE PAST, when we Americans thought about our security, what most often came to mind were things like making sure that our porch lights were on, keeping the doors of our cars locked and not walking alone after dark. That all changed on Sept. 11 last year. Suddenly, we became vulnerable. Porch lights and locked car doors weren't enough. Terrorist attacks no longer happened only in Europe or the Middle East. Longtime Brooklyn Park resident Woody Bowen saw the effect that Sept. 11 had on national security firsthand.
FEATURES
By Rita Reif and Rita Reif,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
Marionettes loll in an upper hallway lined with miniaturetheaters from the red-plush era. Dolls crowd a room nearby, where Christmas is celebrated year round in the Stettheimer doll house, which is filled with stamp-size versions of famous paintings made for it by artists who lived in New York in the 1920s.At the end of a long corridor is toy heaven: a gallery crammed with rocking horses, electric trains, dinosaurs, tricycles, roller skates and board games.Toys are always on display at the Museum of the City of New York.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2002
IN THE PAST, when we Americans thought about our security, what most often came to mind were things like making sure that our porch lights were on, keeping the doors of our cars locked and not walking alone after dark. That all changed on Sept. 11 last year. Suddenly, we became vulnerable. Porch lights and locked car doors weren't enough. Terrorist attacks no longer happened only in Europe or the Middle East. Longtime Brooklyn Park resident Woody Bowen saw the effect that Sept. 11 had on national security firsthand.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
IN 1932, AN aspiring actor made his way to Hollywood. He secured an audition at RKO Studios. The director wasn't very impressed, and he wrote in his report that the actor "can't sing, can't act. Balding. Can dance a little." Despite the review, the studio heads decided to give Fred Astaire a chance and offered him a role in the Joan Crawford-Clark Gable film Dancing Lady. The rest, as they say, is history. Local would-be actors looking for their big break could get it this week. Director Starr Lucas of the Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts will be auditioning adults and children ages 7 and older for a production of Patricia Thackray's Raggedy Ann and Andy.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | February 10, 2002
What does Barbie have that Raggedy Ann doesn't? Besides the hourglass figure and all those accessories? How cuddly is a Tonka truck? Has anyone ever written the adventures of the Hula Hoop? The shocking fact is that all of these toys have what the beloved rag doll does not: A place in the National Toy Hall of Fame. "We love all toys, including Raggedy Ann," said Kim Baldwin, spokeswoman for the Hall of Fame in Salem, Oregon. "The fact is, she just hasn't made the cut." Raggedy Ann fans are out to remedy this injustice with a grassroots petition drive to influence the voting of the 100 mysterious selectors who, each year since 1998, have decided which toys make it into the Hall of Fame.
FEATURES
By Tricia Eller | January 26, 2000
Does your mouth water when Raggedy Ann and Andy pull taffy or when Laura Ingalls Wilder describes the fresh, hot baked-goods her mother made? You can bring these characters and their tempting treats to life using cookbooks designed for kids and centered on the plots of some of their favorite stories. Such cookbooks teach children that reading is fun and has a purpose. Kay Vandergrift, a professor of children's literature at Rutgers University, has compiled a list of cookbooks developed from stories, many that go back to your own days of childhood.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 1997
On a recent Saturday morning at Buddy's Late Night in Parole, five little elves went through their paces, singing and dancing for an audience of families stuffing themselves on scrambled eggs, french toast fingers, sausage, juice, cereal, fruit and pastries.When the music stopped and the adults carried away their offspring to the mall for Christmas shopping, the elves -- as well as the reindeer, the mouse, the bear, Raggedy Ann and Frosty the Snowman -- turned into the cleanup crew.They bused tables, stacked chairs and gathered colored streamers from the stage floor.
FEATURES
By Rita Reif and Rita Reif,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
Marionettes loll in an upper hallway lined with miniaturetheaters from the red-plush era. Dolls crowd a room nearby, where Christmas is celebrated year round in the Stettheimer doll house, which is filled with stamp-size versions of famous paintings made for it by artists who lived in New York in the 1920s.At the end of a long corridor is toy heaven: a gallery crammed with rocking horses, electric trains, dinosaurs, tricycles, roller skates and board games.Toys are always on display at the Museum of the City of New York.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | November 9, 1993
The book "Raggedy Andy Stories," looking pretty good for 70 years old, arrived in the mail with a note from my father's twin sister.A newspaper article about Raggedy Ann, who turned 75 not long ago, prompted her to search for the slim volume of tales about Ann's partner, Andy. It had been a gift to my father in 1923.The book begins with two letters written to author Johnny Gruelle, who had just published a book of Raggedy Ann stories based on a doll that had been his mother's. In the first letter, a woman who calls herself Raggedy Andy's "Mama" describes how the boy doll had comforted her as a child.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 1997
On a recent Saturday morning at Buddy's Late Night in Parole, five little elves went through their paces, singing and dancing for an audience of families stuffing themselves on scrambled eggs, french toast fingers, sausage, juice, cereal, fruit and pastries.When the music stopped and the adults carried away their offspring to the mall for Christmas shopping, the elves -- as well as the reindeer, the mouse, the bear, Raggedy Ann and Frosty the Snowman -- turned into the cleanup crew.They bused tables, stacked chairs and gathered colored streamers from the stage floor.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | September 4, 1994
Q: I have an extensive collection of Disneyana that includes original cels, plates and limited editions. How do I go about reaching Disney collectors?A: Collectors interested in selling their collections should refer to "Collector's Information Clearinghouse, Antiques & Collectibles Resource Directory" by David Maloney.Q: I have a Raggedy Ann doll that I was given around 1967. She is wearing her original clothes. A label that says "Knickerbocker" is attached to her. Could you tell me her value?
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