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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- They arrive here almost daily now -- thin, sun-stricken, in shock from both the voyage and the realization that they have survived.Palms upturned, Sixto de la Riva Linares shows the open blisters he got from two days of rowing. "We felt like it would never end," he said. "But hope was the last thing we wanted to lose."Refugees from Cuba are rafting across the Florida Straits in record numbers. The Coast Guard has picked up or assisted 295 Cubans so far in April, including 52 Friday, and 1,401 since the first of the year.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | September 23, 1990
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. -- It's so relaxin drifting on a raft down stretches of the Colorado River, beneath the towering red walls of the Grand Canyon, that you can easily slip into that twilight zone between consciousness and sleep. Just about the time you're ready to doze off in the blazing sunshine, however, there comes this sound.Faint at first, but growing louder, is an ominous rumble that causes all your survival instincts to flash bright red."If you hear it but can't see it, watch out," river guide Paul Thevenin says calmly, nodding in the direction of the increasingly deafening din.Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Chris Waldmann and Melissa Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
About midway through the episode, it became so clear who this week's eliminated team was going to be that the show itself seemed to lose interest. Not that Team You Tube was that interesting anyway, on this season or  Joey and Meagan were pleasant enough, but for two people who have willingly spent so much of their waking life talking into a camera, the two Internet personalities never really excelled in their "Amazing Race" interviews. Ultimately, Team You Tube was tripped up by a banal mistake.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 20, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- Jose Ramon Ortega and his family got off their raft of three tire tubes, four pieces of two-by-four, a sheet of plywood, all held together by a knotted rope, just in time to hear President Clinton say there would be no more like them.With his wife, three stepsons, a stepdaughter and his pet dog, Honey, the 52-year-old truck driver was among the last group of Cuban refugees automatically allowed into the United States.No sooner were they admitted yesterday, than Mr. Clinton closed the door that had been open to Cuban refugees like them for almost 30 years under a 1966 law.His face scorched by two days on the water, Mr. Ortega, a wiry figure in a newly acquired T-shirt emblazoned "Las Vegas -- Gambling Capital of the World," listened at the Cuban Refugee Center here to Mr. Clinton announce on television that Cubans would now be processed like other refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Chris Waldmann and Melissa Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
About midway through the episode, it became so clear who this week's eliminated team was going to be that the show itself seemed to lose interest. Not that Team You Tube was that interesting anyway, on this season or  Joey and Meagan were pleasant enough, but for two people who have willingly spent so much of their waking life talking into a camera, the two Internet personalities never really excelled in their "Amazing Race" interviews. Ultimately, Team You Tube was tripped up by a banal mistake.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 14, 2004
WESTERNPORT - On Monday, I floated over a Fortune 500 company's effluent - a brownish-green industrial ooze gushing from underwater vents that looked like they'd been planted in the streambed by fiendish aquatic trolls of Middle Earth. But this was not Tolkien fiction. This was 21st-century pulp reality. And it occurred in broad daylight - as it has for decades, with our government's permission - in the North Branch of the Potomac River, just off the banks of this town. Here, MeadWestvaco, one of the world's largest producers of fancy, polished paper - the kind on which magazines and catalogues are published - "clarifies" and dumps its waste.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
The table saws and routers were silent; the sawdust had long since settled.But outside a work shed at Mayo's Casa Rio Marina, the 18-foot-long raft -- a prototypical floating laboratory -- continues to take shape in the minds of a group of young shipwrights.Tom Rodgers of the Draketail Maritime Project drills his eight apprentices, ranging in age from 10 to 16, on Archimedes, a Greek mathematician whose theorems on the displacement of water are central to boat construction.These are just the first rudimentary steps, he says.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | September 22, 1991
Recently, a friend, discussing how rapidly changing technology has altered our concept of time, used a white-water rafting expedition he took this summer to illustrate the challenges facing managers in the 21st century.The world, he reasoned, is a raft, engulfed in a swirl of shifting events -- choppy, fast-moving rapids, tossing the raft to and fro, bombarding its navigators with a steady barrage of challenges that demand swift responses.With no luxury of long, studied analysis, managers will have to make their decisions on the spot, instinctively, intuitively.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 21, 1994
KEY WEST, Fla. -- From the cockpit of his Cessna 310, Lorenzo Orestes is struck by two things about the Cuban boat people he sees floating in the Florida Straits below: the flimsiness of their rafts and the number of family groups on them.Those are the key differences between the latest exodus from the Communist island and previous migrations.Ordinary, everyday Cubans, professionals, tradesmen, their wives and children, even grandparents, are risking their lives on the deep blue waters with the sharks down there.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
A raft of new state laws take effect Monday, imposing new requirements from the car seat to the hearse. Children under 8 years old will be required to sit in a booster seat or child seat until they reach a certain height - the Maryland legislature repealed a provision that allowed heavier children to forego a special seat. And morticians will have to follow stricter rules when handling the dead, under legislation enacted by the General Assembly earlier this year. Other laws cut costs for patients undergoing oral chemotherapy, allow sports fans to win cash prizes in online fantasy football tournaments and give prisoners a reprieve from having to pay child support while behind bars.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Hairstylist Reggie Dowdy has found himself time and time again doing emergency hair repair on women whose tresses have been damaged by weaves and extensions. They come in with bald spots, also known as alopecia, and thinning hair caused by heavy weaves pulling at their scalps. Sometimes their real hair is so unkempt underneath the weave that it becomes matted and breaks off if they try to comb it. Or they break out in rashes because of the glue some stylists use to apply weaves. Dowdy doesn't oppose weaves and extensions — the hair practice makes up 50 percent of the business at his salon, Geometrics Hair Studio in Canton.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
West Virginia's New River Gorge area was already a destination for adrenaline junkies, but now the thrill factor has reached new heights. Two hundred feet, to be precise. That's the height at the highest point of Gravity, the mile-long zip line that is the latest attraction at the growing Adventures on the Gorge vacation complex. Participants jump from platforms high in the trees, reaching speeds of 40 mph to 60 mph as they glide along zip lines that take them whizzing through the West Virginia forest.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2011
Restaurateur Lawrence J. Thanner Jr. gladly welcomed a visitor aboard his "boat," as he called it, pointing out the features of the craft he had just built and lashed to the pier at Dock of the Bay restaurant on Millers Island. The thing has no engine, no sail, tiller or steering wheel, not even a discernible bow or stern. "This is my boat, my first attempt at boat-building," he said. "Perhaps the next one will be a little different design. " Made of treated lumber, the 12-by-20-foot raft was built and "launched" this month as the latest chapter in Thanner's continuing battle with authorities to offer musical entertainment at Dock of the Bay, a year-round place now entering its busy season.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
From wineries to windmills, the Howard County Council undertook to vote on a long list of big bills Thursday before starting the group's annual August recess. But one measure wasn't quite ripe, as it turned out. The winery legislation wound up being tabled until Sept. 7 for consideration of more amendments, but the council approved several significant measures without any disputes on the final votes. No council member voted against any of the legislation. Included were: •Approval of adding a 107-acre farm in Woodbine to the county's Agricultural Preservation program, which will mean $3 million plus interest for Mario and Serafina Manarelli over the next two decades.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | March 25, 2010
I f you're an Orioles fan, it's never too early to panic. Why, panic is basically built into your DNA. It's what 12 straight losing seasons have done to you. At the slightest hint of bad news, your hands start to sweat and your brain is wired to think: Uh-oh, here we go again. Which brings us to spring training 2010. As you might have heard, things are not going real well down in Sarasota, Fla. - at least not when it comes to injuries. In fact, the trainer's room looks like your favorite bakery on Sunday morning.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Alfredo Perez is glad to be in Baltimore, but the water-stained picture of him kneeling beside his little daughter is a constant reminder of why he's not happy yet.The picture was damaged when he set out on a flimsy raft from his native Cuba to escape the government of Fidel Castro. He held tightly to the photo when he was picked up by the Coast Guard and taken to the Guantanamo Bay refugee camp.Even now, eight months later, he becomes emotional when he talks about his 5-year-old Sheila, who remained behind with his wife in Cuba.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,SUN STAFF WRITER | September 7, 1994
HAVANA -- The Soviet-built, Zhuk fast-attack boat bore down on the raft with its tiny black sails bobbing in 3-foot seas six miles off Havana -- halfway to freedom.The nine people aboard were resigned to their fate. The Cuban patrol boat could put an end to their journey. A girl aboard the raft would be young enough to warrant seizing the craft, because young children have been forbidden from joining the exodus from Cuba.Orlando Mendez clung to the crude tiller. He was a distinguished-looking man in his early 50s. He checked his compass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 21, 2009
Hanna M. Crafton, an outdoorswoman, writer and Celtic musician, died March 12 after being injured in an automobile accident near Laurel. The former longtime Reisterstown resident, who recently moved to Severna Park, was 20. The auto in which Ms. Crafton was a passenger was traveling near Laurel when it drifted off Route 198 and struck a tree. She was pronounced dead at the scene. Ms. Crafton was born in Baltimore and raised in Reisterstown. During her seven years at Notre Dame Preparatory School in Towson, she made a lasting impression on teachers and students.
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