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Rafael Alvarez

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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | December 21, 2007
About three dozen picketers, including actors from The Wire, took to a Baltimore street corner yesterday morning to voice their support for the Writers Guild of America's seven-week-old strike against movie and television producers. "Their fight is our fight," said actor Delaney Williams, a member of the Screen Actors Guild who plays Sgt. Jay Landsman on HBO's The Wire. The picketers, massed at the corner of Pratt and Light streets, handed out leaflets to the occasional pedestrian and waved signs at passing motorists.
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Peter Schmuck | September 11, 2014
Paul Blair doesn't have a statue behind center field at Camden Yards, and he wasn't honored by the Orioles with a uniform patch this season after he passed away last December. But he does have a legion of fans in Baltimore who plan to honor him with signs and cheers when the Orioles and the New York Yankees play a doubleheader at Camden Yards on Friday. The grassroots tribute to a guy who was arguably the greatest defensive center fielder in club history began earlier in the week when Baltimore City Council Chairman Bernard C. “Jack” Young introduced a resolution honoring Blair, who made his major league debut with the Orioles 50 years ago this past Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 30, 2000
"Orio and Leini" by Rafael Alvarez (Woodholme House, 175 pages, $14.95) There is no possible way, I long ago decided, for a newspaper or magazine to review the work of members of it's staff in such a way as to be believed to be objective by any healthily skeptical reader. With that established, I unhesitatingly recommend Rafael Alvarez's latest excursion with the native wildlife of Baltimore. Alvarez, a thoroughly professional reporter and a devoted Baltimorean, adores and celebrates the city and the people of its streets and neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
FEATURES
February 7, 2000
The Maryland Center for the Book has named Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez the winner of its first Rising Star Award. The award, which honors a Maryland writer showing exceptional literary promise, will be presented May 12 at the Maryland Library Association's annual conference in Towson. Alvarez, a lifelong resident of Baltimore, is the author of "The Fountain of Highlandtown," a collection of short stories, and "Hometown Boy," a collection of his articles for The Sun. His latest book, "Orlo and Leini," is the six-story saga of a Baltimore junkman and his tormented Greek lover.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 12, 2012
Make sure you take a break Saturday from your weeding, planting and other household chores to stop by the CityLit Festival at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It's one of Baltimore's best literary events, and the schedule is always packed with an entertaining list of speakers. The headliner this year is Walter Isaacson, biographer Steve Jobs, the late Apple CEO. At noon, I'll moderate a panel called In the Service of Short Stories, with authors Rafael Alvarez, ("Orlo and Leini")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | July 2, 1995
"Carry Me Like Water," by Benjamin Alire Saenz. 448 pages, Hyperion. $22.95Back in the days when George Minot and I ran fiction workshops out of Miss Bonnie's Elvis Bar, George would hold up a manuscript and ask: "Who's story is this?"It was not a question of authorship. George sought to excise and exhibit the heart of narrative: Who's story is being told?In poet Ben Senz's first novel "Carry Me Like Water" - a book about miracles that falls short of becoming a miraculous book - the story belongs to a small crowd of characters vexed by identity: their real ones, their assumed ones, and the one that results from carrying both around for too long.
FEATURES
January 22, 1995
DRINKING AND TOWINGEditor: Re: "A Thanksgiving Duck," by Rafael Alvarez [Nov. 20] -- two things gnawed at me about Mr. Alvarez's story.First, while I spent six years working on tugs -- both ocean and inland Chesapeake -- I never saw the drinking he rests the story's outcome on. There wasn't that kind of tolerance for it in the "old days" and, recent legislation . . . and the general attitude have diminished the tolerance to zero.Second, hawsers are not "coiled fore and aft." Decklines are. The hawser is the line that attaches to the barge for towing.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 11, 2014
Paul Blair doesn't have a statue behind center field at Camden Yards, and he wasn't honored by the Orioles with a uniform patch this season after he passed away last December. But he does have a legion of fans in Baltimore who plan to honor him with signs and cheers when the Orioles and the New York Yankees play a doubleheader at Camden Yards on Friday. The grassroots tribute to a guy who was arguably the greatest defensive center fielder in club history began earlier in the week when Baltimore City Council Chairman Bernard C. “Jack” Young introduced a resolution honoring Blair, who made his major league debut with the Orioles 50 years ago this past Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 12, 2012
Make sure you take a break Saturday from your weeding, planting and other household chores to stop by the CityLit Festival at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. It's one of Baltimore's best literary events, and the schedule is always packed with an entertaining list of speakers. The headliner this year is Walter Isaacson, biographer Steve Jobs, the late Apple CEO. At noon, I'll moderate a panel called In the Service of Short Stories, with authors Rafael Alvarez, ("Orlo and Leini")
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Baltimore schoolkids collected pennies nearly 150 years ago to save Edgar Allan Poe the indignity of lying in an unmarked grave. Now another "Pennies for Poe" campaign is under way, this time with the intention of sparing his North Amity Street house from closure. Which brings us to the fishbowl on the counter at G&A Restaurant on Eastern Avenue, not far from the grill where Coney Island hot dogs sizzle. How does Baltimore's literary giant get mixed up with a Highlandtown diner?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach | January 20, 2010
Talk about a midnight dreary. Dozens of fans of Edgar Allan Poe were left standing out in the cold Tuesday when a mysterious nocturnal visitor didn't keep his standing date to toast the author at his Baltimore burial plot. The so-called Poe Toaster's absence yesterday for the first time in more than 60 years has renewed the decades-long fascination with the visitor's identity. It's also an ominous indication that a beloved local ritual, a cherished example of Baltimore quirkiness, might be coming to an end - a possibility that the poet's partisans hurry to deny.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 12, 2008
So the newspaper where you toiled for more than two decades gives you a mention - and misspells your name. If that doesn't say something about the sorry state of journalism, this does: Rafael Alvarez was actually happy that I'd goofed up his first name recently. He could use the exposure of a mea culpa column. It's tough out there for a writer, even one who went on from newspapers to work for The Wire and network TV. Alvarez said he was making $7,000 a week as a producer on the NBC show Life when he went on strike with other Hollywood writers last year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | December 21, 2007
About three dozen picketers, including actors from The Wire, took to a Baltimore street corner yesterday morning to voice their support for the Writers Guild of America's seven-week-old strike against movie and television producers. "Their fight is our fight," said actor Delaney Williams, a member of the Screen Actors Guild who plays Sgt. Jay Landsman on HBO's The Wire. The picketers, massed at the corner of Pratt and Light streets, handed out leaflets to the occasional pedestrian and waved signs at passing motorists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 30, 2000
"Orio and Leini" by Rafael Alvarez (Woodholme House, 175 pages, $14.95) There is no possible way, I long ago decided, for a newspaper or magazine to review the work of members of it's staff in such a way as to be believed to be objective by any healthily skeptical reader. With that established, I unhesitatingly recommend Rafael Alvarez's latest excursion with the native wildlife of Baltimore. Alvarez, a thoroughly professional reporter and a devoted Baltimorean, adores and celebrates the city and the people of its streets and neighborhood.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2011
Baltimore schoolkids collected pennies nearly 150 years ago to save Edgar Allan Poe the indignity of lying in an unmarked grave. Now another "Pennies for Poe" campaign is under way, this time with the intention of sparing his North Amity Street house from closure. Which brings us to the fishbowl on the counter at G&A Restaurant on Eastern Avenue, not far from the grill where Coney Island hot dogs sizzle. How does Baltimore's literary giant get mixed up with a Highlandtown diner?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 30, 1999
Newspaper writers, from time to time, write books. It is impossible, I believe, for a newspaper (or a books editor like me) to be credible in assessing the work of its own. Even if such judgments are pure as driven snow, should a skeptical reader reasonably be expected to believe no prejudice creeps in? Two new books by Sun staff writers are about to appear: "Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore," by Rafael Alvarez (Baltimore Sun, 323 pages, $13.95)
FEATURES
February 7, 2000
The Maryland Center for the Book has named Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez the winner of its first Rising Star Award. The award, which honors a Maryland writer showing exceptional literary promise, will be presented May 12 at the Maryland Library Association's annual conference in Towson. Alvarez, a lifelong resident of Baltimore, is the author of "The Fountain of Highlandtown," a collection of short stories, and "Hometown Boy," a collection of his articles for The Sun. His latest book, "Orlo and Leini," is the six-story saga of a Baltimore junkman and his tormented Greek lover.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 30, 1999
Newspaper writers, from time to time, write books. It is impossible, I believe, for a newspaper (or a books editor like me) to be credible in assessing the work of its own. Even if such judgments are pure as driven snow, should a skeptical reader reasonably be expected to believe no prejudice creeps in? Two new books by Sun staff writers are about to appear: "Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore," by Rafael Alvarez (Baltimore Sun, 323 pages, $13.95)
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