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Radon

BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1998
Anyone in the home-buying mode may be a little spooked after hearing about the families that recently moved out of their new Howard County homes because high levels of explosive methane gas were detected in the basements.Could it happen elsewhere? Who's responsible in this type of situation? How can you protect yourself?Sure, most buyers know they should have a home inspector check for things such as bad plumbing and faulty wiring, but methane? Are there other environmental hazards lurking in and around a home?
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NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
Radon levels at Crofton Middle School are normal -- despite calls from a distraught janitor warning of big problems -- according to a test completed by the county operations department this week.Crofton Middle, in the 2300 block of Davidsonville Road, is the only school in the county to have tested positive for radon.On Sept. 29, Michael W. Graham, the head janitor, made telephone calls to a number of school system employees warning about radon danger.The next day, Daniel A. La Hart, environmental program manager for Anne Arundel County schools, put 63 radon-sampling canisters in the school.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1997
The day after Anne Arundel County school officials suspended the head custodian for making incoherent calls about radon gas at Crofton Middle School, an environmental specialist yesterday installed radon-detection devices in the building.Crofton Middle, as it turns out, is the only school in the county system being monitored regularly for radon.Yesterday, Daniel A. La Hart, the schools' environmental program manager, put detection devices called canisters in three locations at the school.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | September 21, 1997
SOME PEOPLE look at a basement and see a dark, dank place to be avoided at all costs.Others see a gold mine of extra living space.Club basements, rec rooms -- whatever you call them, they're popular projects for a lot of homeowners. Basements traditionally are among the most underused spaces in the house.But before you buy the pool table or the wide-screen TV, you need to do a few things to make sure the basement will be a comfortable place.The first is to make sure that the basement is dry.Newer houses are built with drain tile that runs below the level of the floor slab all around the perimeter of the space.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1996
Lung Association offers testing kit for radon in homeThe Maryland Chapter of the American Lung Association is offering a "do-it-yourself" home radon testing kit to state homeowners for $10 plus tax. Calls to area retailers found test kits going for $12.59 to $16.90.Radon is a colorless, odorless and tasteless radioactive gas produced by the natural decay of uranium, which is present in most rock and soil.Studies by the Environmental Protection Agency have identified radon exposure as the second leading cause of lung cancer.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1995
Hampton Mansion, the 18th-century centerpiece of a National Historic Site in Towson, has a radioactive intruder in the basement.The invisible invader is radon, the cancer-causing gas that is as old as the hills -- and somewhat mysterious as to how big a threat it is.Colorless and odorless, radon seeps into buildings from the soil. Concentrations usually reach a peak in the winter because closed windows reduce ventilation.In February, one room in the mansion basement had a reading of 11.6 picocuries per liter of air, well above the Environmental Protection Agency's risk point of 4 picocuries for dwellings.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Several new studies of radon, the radioactive gas known to cause cancer and found to be seeping into millions of homes across the country, have uncovered little evidence linking household exposure to the disease, raising questions about how much risk radon poses to humans at very low levels.Researchers say these studies have in most cases failed to show an association between lung cancer and household radon levels at or even slightly higher than the level at which the Environmental Protection Agency recommends taking corrective measures.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Sun Staff Writer | August 16, 1994
There's never a shortage of health crises -- cancer, AIDS, infant mortality, obesity, a resurgence of tuberculosis.Some stay in the public consciousness for years, even decades. Others burst on the scene then disappear.Remember radon?Before 1985, most people had never heard of it. Then suddenly, the public was bombarded with studies, stories and scary statistics. Brochures from legions of new testing companies warned that the gas causes lung cancer at certain levels.The hysteria quickly passed.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
The bright orange Fiesta dishware that many Americans use and collect is "hot" -- radioactive -- and could be giving off enough radon gas to pose a significant health risk, a Massachusetts geologist says."
FEATURES
By Dr. Genev and Dr. Genev,ieve Matanoski Contributing Writer | August 31, 1993
Recently, I've had a number of questions from women who have read about radon and wonder if they should be testing their homes for the level of indoor radon.As it happens, I've done quite a bit of work on indoor radon exposure and will try to explain it.As with so many human exposures, the answers are often complex, and it is difficult for women to know what they should actually do to protect themselves and their families.Why is radon a concern?Radon is a naturally occurring gas created as radium-226 decays.
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