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NEWS
November 22, 2007
Sister Madeleine Francis Skrovanek, a longtime radiology supervisor at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, died of renal failure Sunday at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 88. Born Elizabeth Bridget Skrovanek in Allentown, Pa., she joined the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1938 and received the name Madeleine Francis. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from Villanova University. She also studied radiology at St. Francis Hospital School of Radiology in Trenton, N.J. Early in her career, she taught at St. Peter Claver Parochial School in Northwest Baltimore and later held posts in Philadelphia, Trenton, New Haven, Conn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Dr. Mark E. Bohlman, chairman of the department of radiology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died July 11 of cancer at the Mandrin Inpatient Care Center in Harwood in Anne Arundel County. He was 64. The son of Earl Bohlman, who was supervisor of electrical maintenance and construction for the B&O Railroad, and Mary McCoy Bohlman, Mark Earl Bohlman was born in Baltimore and raised in Milford Mill. After graduating in 1968 from Milford Mill High School, where he had been a wrestler and an Eagle Scout, he earned his bachelor's degree in 1972 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2001
Dr. John Phillips Dorst, an expert on dwarfism who headed pediatric radiology at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, died Tuesday of a brain tumor at Brightwood Genesis Eldercare in Brooklandville. He was 74 and had lived in Columbia since 1972. A prolific researcher who studied genetic bone disorders, he was director of pediatric radiology at the Hopkins Children's Center from 1966 to 1990. While there, he taught medical students, residents and fellows how to read children's X-rays. He retired in 1995.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
Dr. Nancy O'Neil Whitley, former professor of diagnostic radiology and oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and an internationally recognized authority on the use of computerized axial tomography, died of cancer May 16 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 66.Dr. Whitley moved to Baltimore in 1978, when her husband, Dr. Joseph Whitley, whom she married in 1959, was named chairman of diagnostic radiology at the University of Maryland Medical School. He died in 1989.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
Dr. John Howard Franz, a former chief of radiology at Maryland General Hospital, died of prostate cancer Wednesday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Kingsville resident was 86. Dr. Franz was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1934 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned his bachelor's degree in 1938 from Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Va. He earned his medical degree from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in 1942 and completed a residency in radiology.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
A regional chain of radiology centers and its owner are in default on $1.1 million in fines for performing mammograms after one of its facilities lost its certification to perform the procedure because of equipment problems, according to documents released this week by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA issued a "notice of default" to Dr. Amile A. Korangy, owner of Korangy Radiology Associates, on June 20 after he failed to make a scheduled payment of $579,000 last month. The letter indicates the agency rejected Korangy's offer to pay $150,000 June 12, followed by payments of $100,000 per month until the debt was paid.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
A Johns Hopkins Hospital radiology student died yesterday morning when the car he was driving crashed into a tree in northern Baltimore County.Brandon M. Moore, 21, of the 2800 block of Troyer Road in Harford County was traveling west on Shepperd Road -- less than a mile from his home -- when his 1994 Honda Accord crossed the center line and hit a tree, Baltimore County police said.He was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after 4 a.m.Police said driver error and excessive speed were factors in the crash.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
Three large radiology practices and Johns Hopkins Imaging, the off-campus radiology group of Johns Hopkins Medicine, announced yesterday they are merging to form American Radiology Services Inc. -- a behemoth with more than 70 doctors, 25 outpatient locations, 13 hospital contracts and $40 million to $50 million in annual revenue.The managed care market has compelled mergers among all sorts of health providers, and the economic forces for consolidation are especially strong among radiologists because their equipment is so expensive.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 1, 1991
Most graduations signal a beginning. But for the tiny radiology class at Harbor Hospital Center, Friday's ceremony marked the end.When the six students received their diplomas, hospital administrators brushed away tears along with the parents.The 37th class was the last to graduate from Harbor Hospital's School of Radiologic Technology. Faced with a shortage of instructors and competition from nearby community colleges, the Baltimore hospitalis closing its radiology school."It's a loss when you close any education program, but we're trying to make the best of it," said Nancy Kraft, vice president of medical support services.
HEALTH
By Jay Hancock | May 17, 2011
There is little question that Maryland legislators intended to "substantially restrict" the ability of urologists and other prescribing doctors to refer patients to their own radiation centers, the state Court of Appeals wrote a few months ago. Why? Study after study shows that when doctors profit from expensive radiology procedures, they order too many of them. Medicos who refer cancer patients to self-owned radiation centers "increase the use of services and costs substantially" and don't improve care, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in the 1990s.
HEALTH
By Jay Hancock | February 8, 2011
The United States is the No. 1 prescriber of MRI scans, expensive radiological procedures used as an alternative to X-rays. This dubious distinction is one reason American health care is so expensive. Maryland is No. 2 in the rate of MRI tests performed in the United States, an even more alarming accomplishment that inflates medical costs for residents and helps keep health-insurance premiums heading steadily upward. A group of Maryland orthopedists and other doctors wants to make sure things stay that way. They're trying to get the state legislature to nullify a Court of Appeals decision that would make them refer MRI and CT scan business to independent radiologists instead of performing scans themselves.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
John Nicholas Diaconis, a Baltimore radiologist and medical professor who had been acting chairman of the department of radiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine during the 1970s, died Sunday of cholangiocarcinoma, a cancer of the bile ducts, at Gilchrist Hospice Center. The longtime Timonium resident was 74. Dr. Diaconis was born in Pittsburgh and moved with his family to Folcroft Street in East Baltimore after his parents established an Eastern Avenue bakery. He was a 1951 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland in 1955.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | July 3, 2008
A regional chain of radiology centers and its owner are in default on $1.1 million in fines for performing mammograms after one of its facilities lost its certification to perform the procedure because of equipment problems, according to documents released this week by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA issued a "notice of default" to Dr. Amile A. Korangy, owner of Korangy Radiology Associates, on June 20 after he failed to make a scheduled payment of $579,000 last month. The letter indicates the agency rejected Korangy's offer to pay $150,000 June 12, followed by payments of $100,000 per month until the debt was paid.
FEATURES
April 24, 2008
Tyeisha C. Jones is the new director of Autism & Related Services for the League for People with Disabilities. Jones will coordinate therapeutic integration, individual support, family support and respite services for the league's autism services. She has worked for more than eight years in case management for Baltimore-area service agencies, including for ARC of Baltimore and Service Coordination Inc. Jones has her master's degree in rehabilitation counseling and bachelor's degree in applied psychology from Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 19, 2008
Dr. Jon Keith Park, a retired University of Maryland dental radiology professor, died March 12 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries suffered in an automobile accident on Merritt Boulevard last month. The Dundalk resident was 69. Born in Wichita, Kan., Dr. Park was the son of a dentist and earned a degree at the University of Missouri Dental School. He moved to Maryland in 1972 to join the faculty of the University of Maryland Dental School, where he taught for 35 years. He had been associate professor and director of oral radiology.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1997
In Monday's Business section, the name of the publisher of a radiology software CD was spelled incorrectly. The correct name is Williams & Wilkins.The Sun regrets the error.It's been more than two years since Dr. Michael McDermott, at the time a young resident in the University of Maryland School of Medicine's radiology program, began tinkering around with storing and retrieving radiology images on computers.He was certain that computer CD-ROMS offered an opportunity for vast amounts of medical information to be stored and carried around easily.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
John Nicholas Diaconis, a Baltimore radiologist and medical professor who had been acting chairman of the department of radiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine during the 1970s, died Sunday of cholangiocarcinoma, a cancer of the bile ducts, at Gilchrist Hospice Center. The longtime Timonium resident was 74. Dr. Diaconis was born in Pittsburgh and moved with his family to Folcroft Street in East Baltimore after his parents established an Eastern Avenue bakery. He was a 1951 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland in 1955.
NEWS
November 22, 2007
Sister Madeleine Francis Skrovanek, a longtime radiology supervisor at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, died of renal failure Sunday at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 88. Born Elizabeth Bridget Skrovanek in Allentown, Pa., she joined the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1938 and received the name Madeleine Francis. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from Villanova University. She also studied radiology at St. Francis Hospital School of Radiology in Trenton, N.J. Early in her career, she taught at St. Peter Claver Parochial School in Northwest Baltimore and later held posts in Philadelphia, Trenton, New Haven, Conn.
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