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Radioactive

FEATURES
March 17, 2008
March 17 1950 Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, californium.
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FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
The bright orange Fiesta dishware that many Americans use and collect is "hot" -- radioactive -- and could be giving off enough radon gas to pose a significant health risk, a Massachusetts geologist says."
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Scientists have found harmless bacteria that they say can remove radioactive contaminants from wastewater.The phenomenon may open the way for biological filtration of water-borne nuclear waste that would be cheaper and more effective than chemical methods now in use, said Dr. Brendlyn D. Faison, one of the researchers at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that made the discovery.While it does not resolve the crucial problem of nuclear-waste disposal, the microbial "scrubbing" of wastewater offers a natural way to remove harmful metals and radioactive contaminants in water that drains from facilities like radiology rooms, nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons factories, Dr. Faison said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Peach Bottom has two of the 31 Mark and Mark 2 reactors that are being required to upgrade their venting system in case of a severe accident ("Peach Bottom reactors to get venting upgrade," June 7). What Sun reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins leaves out is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission members ignored staff advice to require containment filters in Mark 1 and Mark 2 reactors which is being required in Japan on all of its reactors and already has been in some European countries.
NEWS
By Jean Ewing | August 25, 1991
We Darlington residents live amid some of the most beautiful rollinghills and handsome farms in the nation.We also live just a few miles from a nuclear power plant -- Peach Bottom Atomic Plant in Delta, Pa.And so the news last week about a discovery for locking radioactive waste inside a crystalline structure touched on old fears and recalled past misjudgment by Philadelphia Electric Co., which operates the plant.Synroc, (for synthetic rock), is an advanced ceramic thatcan be fused with radioactive waste, locking it inside its crystalline structure.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
A long-awaited public meeting on plans to remove nuclear contamination from county-owned property on New Ordnance Road that once was part of an Army depot is scheduled for 7:30 tonight at the auditorium of North County High School in Linthicum.Radioactive thorium nitrate was discovered on the property during a May 1992 inspection. At the time, the 85-acre property was being considered as the site for a new county detention center.Thorium nitrate is an especially potent radioactive substance, and scientists have said that the levels found at the depot are high enough to pose health risks to a person who merely stands near it.Two federal agencies, the Defense Logistics Agency and the General Services Administration, have been arguing over who is responsible for the cleanup.
NEWS
August 28, 1999
Raymond Vernon,85, an internationally renowned business expert, died in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday from complications of cancer. He helped develop the International Monetary Fund and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Charles Hollister,63, who was well-known for his research into burying radioactive waste under the ocean, died after falling 60 feet while rock climbing Monday. He was vice president and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1990
AIKEN, S.C. -- In a milestone on the road to cleaning up after 40 years of making atomic bombs, the Department of Energy dedicated a $1.3 billion plant yesterday to deal with its most hazardous wastes: millions of gallons of highly radioactive sludges and liquids in decaying steel tanks.The department said the plant, the largest of its kind in the nation, would be tested for two years with non-radioactive wastes and would begin operating in 1992.More than half the radioactivity from the nation's military waste is held in 51 underground tanks at the Savannah River Site here, each with 750,000 to 1.3 million gallons of waste.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 29, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Epilepsy surgery is gaining in popularity as techniques for finding diseased tissue and removing it have improved, said Dr. William Theodore, chief of the clinical epilepsy branch at the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke in Bethesda, Md. But the most spectacular results are being seen in babies and very young children."
BUSINESS
July 23, 1998
GTS Duratek, a Columbia hazardous-waste-disposal company, said yesterday that it and several partners have reached agreement with the Department of Energy on a contract worth about $6.9 billion for cleanup at a federal storage site for radioactive waste.GTS Duratek and its lead partner, BNFL Inc. of Britain, will immobilize up to a quarter of the radioactive materials in 54 million gallons of waste at the federal Hanford Site near Richland, Wash.The government stores radioactive byproducts and nuclear waste in 177 underground tanks at Hanford.
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