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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | May 23, 1999
BEFORE I GET TO today's topic, which is celebrity-attacking birds, I want to issue a formal apology to the "Tri Cities." The Tri Cities are Pasco, Richland and Kennewick, Wash., which call themselves the Tri Cities in proud recognition of the fact that there are three of them. I had not heard of these cities until recently, when I wrote a column about the Hanford contaminated nuclear dump site, which is located near the Tri Cities. My column was about the fact that radioactive ants, flies and gnats had been discovered at Hanford; I expressed concern that they might mutate and become gigantic and attack Los Angeles and suck all the blood out of actress Fran Drescher.
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NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Scientists have found harmless bacteria that they say can remove radioactive contaminants from wastewater.The phenomenon may open the way for biological filtration of water-borne nuclear waste that would be cheaper and more effective than chemical methods now in use, said Dr. Brendlyn D. Faison, one of the researchers at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that made the discovery.While it does not resolve the crucial problem of nuclear-waste disposal, the microbial "scrubbing" of wastewater offers a natural way to remove harmful metals and radioactive contaminants in water that drains from facilities like radiology rooms, nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons factories, Dr. Faison said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 31, 1997
MIT and Quaker Oats have agreed to pay $1.85 million to former residents of the Fernald State School in Waltham, Mass., who were fed radiation-spiked breakfast cereal in nutrition experiments during the 1940s and 1950s.The settlement "is a recognition that these actions were improper and a violation of the civil rights of helpless children," said Alexander Bok, an attorney for the 15 plaintiffs who filed the class action suit in December 1995.Those children -- some of whom were mentally handicapped and some from troubled families -- were frequently used for medical and nutritional experiments without the informed consent of their parents.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Peach Bottom has two of the 31 Mark and Mark 2 reactors that are being required to upgrade their venting system in case of a severe accident ("Peach Bottom reactors to get venting upgrade," June 7). What Sun reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins leaves out is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission members ignored staff advice to require containment filters in Mark 1 and Mark 2 reactors which is being required in Japan on all of its reactors and already has been in some European countries.
NEWS
By Jean Ewing | August 25, 1991
We Darlington residents live amid some of the most beautiful rollinghills and handsome farms in the nation.We also live just a few miles from a nuclear power plant -- Peach Bottom Atomic Plant in Delta, Pa.And so the news last week about a discovery for locking radioactive waste inside a crystalline structure touched on old fears and recalled past misjudgment by Philadelphia Electric Co., which operates the plant.Synroc, (for synthetic rock), is an advanced ceramic thatcan be fused with radioactive waste, locking it inside its crystalline structure.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
GTS Duratek said yesterday it would acquire Scientific Ecology Group Inc., a move that will double the work force and triple the revenues of the Columbia-based nuclear waste disposal company.Duratek said it would pay $28 million and 156,986 shares of stock for SEG, which operates the nation's largest commercial radioactive waste processing facility.SEG is based in Oak Ridge, Tenn., and is a unit of Westinghouse Electric Corp.The deal "positions [Duratek] very clearly as the leader in the radioactive waste processing business in the United States," said Deutsche Morgan Grenfell analyst Rod Lache.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 1997
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Steve Iavarone, vice president of the Long Island UFO Network, sits in his second-floor den and glances at his collection of alien kitsch, his massive electronic telescope, his videotape collection that extends from "2001" to "Cocoon." Like the rest -- the friends, the former colleagues, the neighbors who haven't sold their homes and fled for less radioactive parts of Long Island -- he is steadfast.They are the true believers, the ones who can't accept that John J. Ford, red-blooded American right down to his name, could have plotted an assassination.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
A long-awaited public meeting on plans to remove nuclear contamination from county-owned property on New Ordnance Road that once was part of an Army depot is scheduled for 7:30 tonight at the auditorium of North County High School in Linthicum.Radioactive thorium nitrate was discovered on the property during a May 1992 inspection. At the time, the 85-acre property was being considered as the site for a new county detention center.Thorium nitrate is an especially potent radioactive substance, and scientists have said that the levels found at the depot are high enough to pose health risks to a person who merely stands near it.Two federal agencies, the Defense Logistics Agency and the General Services Administration, have been arguing over who is responsible for the cleanup.
NEWS
August 28, 1999
Raymond Vernon,85, an internationally renowned business expert, died in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday from complications of cancer. He helped develop the International Monetary Fund and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Charles Hollister,63, who was well-known for his research into burying radioactive waste under the ocean, died after falling 60 feet while rock climbing Monday. He was vice president and senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod, Mass.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Dan Ervin's commentary on lifting restrictions on U.S. companies supplying nuclear power equipment abroad is completely misleading ("A nuclear opportunity," May 6). Nuclear energy is not, as Mr. Ervin says, pollutant free or carbon free. Government regulations allow nuclear power plants to deliberately' and routinely emit hundreds of thousands of curies of radioactive gases and other radioactive elements into the environment every day. Radiation cannot be seen, felt or tasted, so I'm wondering if this is why Mr. Ervin feels he can credibly say that nuclear power is pollution free.
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