Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRadioactive
IN THE NEWS

Radioactive

NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 5, 2004
EMMETT, Idaho - In the 1950s and early 1960s, at the height of the Cold War, people in this southeastern Idaho town thought what they occasionally saw dusting their fruit orchards and cow pastures was frost - only it was not cold to the touch, several longtime residents said. Others described it as a gray-white powder that seemed to come out of nowhere. The residents of this town of dairy and cattle farmers did not know it then, but half a century ago, northern winds blew radioactive fallout into southeastern Idaho when the federal government set off about 90 nuclear bombs at its Nevada test site near Las Vegas.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Scientists have found harmless bacteria that they say can remove radioactive contaminants from wastewater.The phenomenon may open the way for biological filtration of water-borne nuclear waste that would be cheaper and more effective than chemical methods now in use, said Dr. Brendlyn D. Faison, one of the researchers at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory that made the discovery.While it does not resolve the crucial problem of nuclear-waste disposal, the microbial "scrubbing" of wastewater offers a natural way to remove harmful metals and radioactive contaminants in water that drains from facilities like radiology rooms, nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons factories, Dr. Faison said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | May 15, 1994
County and federal officials will meet with north county residents May 23 to outline plans to demolish eight buildings and remove radioactive soil from the proposed detention center site on Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie.The 85 acres of county-owned land was contaminated by radioactive thorium nitrate that was stored in the warehouses when the property was part of the U.S. Army General Services Depot at Curtis Bay. The thorium was stored in granular form that dissolved when water got into the barrels.
NEWS
By Tara Sonenshine & Jay LaMonica | February 19, 1992
IMAGINE growing up not knowing that the water you drink, the air you breathe and the food you eat are contaminated with radioactive waste.Imagine getting radiation sickness and having doctors tell you only that you are suffering from some "special disease." Imagine finding out 35 years after the fact that a major nuclear accident had taken place near your home but that the authorities had kept it secret. Imagine all that, and you have only begun to imagine the horror of Muslyumovo.Muslyumovo looks like an idyllic Siberian village of about 3,500 souls on the Techa River.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government exposed an untold number of Americans to radioactive fallout during a dozen secret weapons tests from 1948 to 1952, according to a report released yesterday.The tests were kept secret for more than 40 years until the General Accounting Office, Congress' investigative arm, had the information declassified at the request of Sen. John Glenn, an Ohio Democrat."The Cold War frenzy which gripped the nation immediately after World War II created a climate where tests such as these were deemed necessary," Mr. Glenn said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 28, 1990
AIKEN, S.C. -- In a milestone on the road to cleaning up after 40 years of making atomic bombs, the Department of Energy dedicated a $1.3 billion plant yesterday to deal with its most hazardous wastes: millions of gallons of highly radioactive sludges and liquids in decaying steel tanks.The department said the plant, the largest of its kind in the nation, would be tested for two years with non-radioactive wastes and would begin operating in 1992.More than half the radioactivity from the nation's military waste is held in 51 underground tanks at the Savannah River Site here, each with 750,000 to 1.3 million gallons of waste.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Peach Bottom has two of the 31 Mark and Mark 2 reactors that are being required to upgrade their venting system in case of a severe accident ("Peach Bottom reactors to get venting upgrade," June 7). What Sun reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins leaves out is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission members ignored staff advice to require containment filters in Mark 1 and Mark 2 reactors which is being required in Japan on all of its reactors and already has been in some European countries.
NEWS
By Jean Ewing | August 25, 1991
We Darlington residents live amid some of the most beautiful rollinghills and handsome farms in the nation.We also live just a few miles from a nuclear power plant -- Peach Bottom Atomic Plant in Delta, Pa.And so the news last week about a discovery for locking radioactive waste inside a crystalline structure touched on old fears and recalled past misjudgment by Philadelphia Electric Co., which operates the plant.Synroc, (for synthetic rock), is an advanced ceramic thatcan be fused with radioactive waste, locking it inside its crystalline structure.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 1997
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Steve Iavarone, vice president of the Long Island UFO Network, sits in his second-floor den and glances at his collection of alien kitsch, his massive electronic telescope, his videotape collection that extends from "2001" to "Cocoon." Like the rest -- the friends, the former colleagues, the neighbors who haven't sold their homes and fled for less radioactive parts of Long Island -- he is steadfast.They are the true believers, the ones who can't accept that John J. Ford, red-blooded American right down to his name, could have plotted an assassination.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
A long-awaited public meeting on plans to remove nuclear contamination from county-owned property on New Ordnance Road that once was part of an Army depot is scheduled for 7:30 tonight at the auditorium of North County High School in Linthicum.Radioactive thorium nitrate was discovered on the property during a May 1992 inspection. At the time, the 85-acre property was being considered as the site for a new county detention center.Thorium nitrate is an especially potent radioactive substance, and scientists have said that the levels found at the depot are high enough to pose health risks to a person who merely stands near it.Two federal agencies, the Defense Logistics Agency and the General Services Administration, have been arguing over who is responsible for the cleanup.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.