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By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
A device that uses radioactive materials to measure the moisture and density of soil was stolen Wednesday from the Linthicum headquarters of the construction company that is building the light rail extension, county police said.The machine was taken from an old house in the 600 block of Camp Meade Road that is being used by Towson-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. The thief removed an air-conditioning unit from a window and broke into the house, setting off the alarm, about 10: 45 p.m., police said.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
A tool that contains a small amount of radioactive material, used to measure concentrations of lead in paint, was stolen in Baltimore Monday afternoon, the Maryland Department of the Environment said in an alert. The department said the tool, a Dynasil RMD LPA-1 analyzer, stolen after a property inspection in the 2600 block of E. Monument St., poses "no imminent public health risk. " The radioactive material inside the three-pound device is sealed and housed in a tungsten shield, with locks to prevent its shutter from being opened, the department said.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
Federal, state and Anne Arundel officials told about 40 North County residents last night that the removal of radioactive materials from county-owned property on Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie will begin within weeks.But many of those who gathered at the Glen Burnie High School auditorium said the answers they received did little to calm their anxieties that the cleanup would be inadequate, or that removing the contamination could be more harmful than just leaving it there.Many residents said they believe that county and federal officials involved in the cleanup of the land have not been candid with them, and they do not understand why the project is proceeding so quickly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marisa Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
The sixth season of True Blood has come to a close, but was it the epic ending that fans were hoping for? The finale offered up death(s), new relationships and a new big bad - unfortunately, instead of feeling like a return to the show's roots or even a change of direction, it all just felt like more of the same.   Body Count: One, or Two? When Terry was shot, I hoped that his was the big death rumored to be occurring sometime this season. That would mean that Eric Northman (played by Alexander Skarsgard, and the center of most of the rumors)
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
A bright yellow box the size of a suitcase may have looked like a good find to the burglar who prowled through an Odenton construction trailer overnight Wednesday, but police say its contents had no value to the thief -- and could prove hazardous to his health.The box contained a soil moisture-density gauge, which uses radioactive materials to measure the density of compacted soil.Although it emits harmless, minuscule amounts of radioactivity while enclosed in a tungsten and lead compartment, if opened, the exposed elements of americium, beryllium and cesium could cause anything from a rash to cancer, authorities said yesterday.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | March 24, 1994
CHERNOBYL, Ukraine -- Nearly eight years after the Chernobyl meltdown, Ukrainian scientists have found that strontium-90 is leaching into the ground water and may reach Ukraine's most important water reservoir within a few years.The radioactive strontium is carried into the earth by rain and snow that penetrates the concrete-and-steel sarcophagus built in late 1986 to entomb the exploded Chernobyl Unit 4 nuclear reactor.Because of gaping cracks in the sarcophagus roof, about 820,000 gallons of precipitation have infiltrated the reactor building, according to new estimates by the Ukrainian state committee for nuclear and radiation safety.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 1999
I'LL TELL YOU WHEN I start to worry. I start to worry when "officials" tell me not to worry. This is why I am concerned about the following Associated Press report, which was sent to me by a number of alert readers: "RICHLAND, WASH. -- Radioactive ants, flies and gnats have been found at the Hanford nuclear complex, bringing to mind those Cold-War-era 'B' horror movies in which giant mutant insects are the awful price paid for mankind's entry into the Atomic Age. "Officials at the nation's most contaminated nuclear site insist there is no danger of Hanford becoming the setting for a '90s version of "Them!"
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1995
After sifting clues for five years, a team of scientific sleuths has found that puzzling clouds of junk orbiting the Earth are made up of radioactive debris leaking from a large group of orbiting Soviet nuclear reactors.It is the first major case of nuclear pollution in space and one of the messiest environmental legacies of the Cold War.The atomic debris, estimated at 70,000 detectable particles and perhaps millions of smaller ones, poses no danger to people, experts say. But it threatens to damage working satellites and will force engineers to add more shielding to help protect new spacecraft.
NEWS
March 24, 2002
The Howard County section of The Sun reported on a stolen radioactive moisture-density gauge ("Radioactive gauge stolen from construction site," March 19). Beside the facts of the current event, the article brings to light an unbelievably negligent attitude about handling radioactive devices. Issues concerning radioactivity are often discussed without any quantitative measure, making it impossible to distinguish minor mishaps from major concerns. I want to applaud Julie Bykowicz of the Sun's staff for reporting not only the loss of a radioactive device but also giving a few numbers so that the magnitude of the problem could be evaluated.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder | July 9, 1991
Posses using helicopters and airplanes are searching vast stretches of New Mexico for a most unusual fugitive -- a radioactive goat on the lam for two months.Dubbed "The Atomic Goat," the animal escaped during one of those federal experiments that seemed like a good idea at the time. Luckily for it, but unhappily for the searchers, it does not glow in the dark."We haven't seen it or heard from it in a long time," said Mike Fall, a researcher at the Denver Wildlife Research Center.The animal is one of 62 Angora goats fitted with collars holding radioactive isotopes and radio transmitters.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Peach Bottom has two of the 31 Mark and Mark 2 reactors that are being required to upgrade their venting system in case of a severe accident ("Peach Bottom reactors to get venting upgrade," June 7). What Sun reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins leaves out is that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission members ignored staff advice to require containment filters in Mark 1 and Mark 2 reactors which is being required in Japan on all of its reactors and already has been in some European countries.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
Dan Ervin's commentary on lifting restrictions on U.S. companies supplying nuclear power equipment abroad is completely misleading ("A nuclear opportunity," May 6). Nuclear energy is not, as Mr. Ervin says, pollutant free or carbon free. Government regulations allow nuclear power plants to deliberately' and routinely emit hundreds of thousands of curies of radioactive gases and other radioactive elements into the environment every day. Radiation cannot be seen, felt or tasted, so I'm wondering if this is why Mr. Ervin feels he can credibly say that nuclear power is pollution free.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | December 15, 2010
A contractor has recovered a gauge containing a small amount of radioactive material, after reporting the device stolen earlier this month from a work site at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County. The Maryland Department of the Environment says the gauge was found Dec. 10 at the job site where it went missing. The contractor that owns the device told the department that it was in a locked transport container and showed no signs of having been tampered with or having released radioactive material.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | December 3, 2010
A gauge containing a small amount of radioactive material was reported stolen this week from a job site at Fort Meade, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. The Troxler Model 3430 surface moisture density gauge, serial No. 37672, was last seen Monday at the temporary job site and reported stolen by GeoConcepts Engineering, along with other contracting equipment, about 2 p.m. Thursday, according to environment officials. The theft was also reported to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Fort Meade police were notified.
NEWS
July 6, 2010
It was rather sad to read that Rep. Steny H. Hoyer is shilling for Constellation Energy: ("Calvert Cliffs first in line for loan guarantee, Hoyer says," July 2). Hoyer should be promoting renewable energy sources instead of admitting that nuclear energy can't survive economically without taxpayer subsidies. How can anyone support nuclear power today? The banks won't finance a reactor and the insurance companies refuse to issue policies for nuclear power plants. The technology is too dangerous, and no state wants to be the repository for nuclear wastes.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | May 13, 2008
The Savannah, the world's first nuclear-powered commercial vessel, will be docked at Canton Marine Terminals in Baltimore for at least the next year as crews scrub the ship of remaining radioactive materials. The sleek 596-foot cargo and passenger vessel arrived at Vane Brothers Co.'s berth Thursday, after the company won a $588,380 annual contract from the U.S. Maritime Administration to secure the vessel for up to three years. Constructed in the 1950s under President Dwight D.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
Columbia radioactive waste-treatment company GTS Duratek Inc. said yesterday that it has hired First Security Van Kasper, a San Francisco investment banking firm, to help determine whether it should sell its petroleum-products subsidiary.GTS Duratek currently owns 80 percent of that subsidiary, DuraTherm Inc. of San Leon, Texas. DuraTherm specializes in processing petroleum sludge. Any oil squeezed out of the sludge is recycled, and what remains is sent to landfills.DuraTherm took in $10 million in revenue last year.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie | February 4, 1992
GTS Duratek, a company specializing in environmental clean up, was awarded a contract to help dispose of radioactivity from Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant near Wading River, N.Y.The Long Island Power Authority awarded the contract for the two-year project, which is valued at about $14 million.GTS Duratek's employees will monitor the radiation on plant workers, help clean equipment and handle the radioactive waste after the cleaning, according to company officials.The cleanup will occur as Shoreham is decommissioned.
FEATURES
March 17, 2008
March 17 1950 Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley announced they had created a new radioactive element, californium.
NEWS
July 25, 2007
Audit says PSC failed to get state approval for $453,000 contract The state Public Service Commission awarded a $453,000 no-bid contract to a Washington law firm and paid a $27,000 court-ordered judgment without getting approval from the Board of Public Works, a legislative audit found. The audit, which examined the period from Jan. 9, 2004 to Dec. 10, 2006, also found that the commission overbilled utilities to support its operations by $2.2 million. "It happened before I got here, and it won't happen again," said PSC Chairman Steven B. Larsen, who was appointed this year by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
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