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NEWS
September 28, 1994
IT SOUNDS like something that lives in Australia and carries its offspring about in unorthodox fashion. But astronomers report that a Dwingeloo is actually a distant cosmic cousin to our own Milky Way galaxy, a previously undiscovered spiral disc of a billion or so stars lurking just out of sight behind the clouds of dust and gas that swirl around our island universe.Dubbed Dwingeloo 1, the new galaxy was detected last month with the large radio telescope in Dwingeloo, The Netherlands, by a team of Dutch, British and American astronomers.
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TRAVEL
By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | October 3, 2004
Tip No. 1 for a trip to Green Bank, W.Va.: Pack lots of CDs. If you hit the "scan" button on your car radio, all you will get is an endless display of numbers as the radio searches vainly for a station. There aren't any. There isn't much else out here in east-central West Virginia, either -- just an occasional farm, a logging truck or, scampering back into the Monongahela National Forest, a deer. The trip here, via routes 55 and 28, winds up into the clouds where snakes of mist curl around the road.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | May 24, 1999
Want to join the global hunt for E.T.? All you need is a PC. Last week a small band of scientists involved in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) unveiled free software that turns home computers into alien trackers. The software, called SETI@home, runs on both Windows- and Macintosh-based machines and works like a screen saver. Instead of showering the screen with flying toasters when the computer is idle, the software plucks data representing raw signals from a SETI radio telescope in Puerto Rico and combs the numbers for signs of alien communiques.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
Britain's Beagle 2 Mars lander remained silent for a third day yesterday, and scientists now think that their best hope for receiving a signal is the spacecraft's mother ship. Mars Express, Beagle 2's mother ship produced by the European Space Agency, entered orbit around the Red Planet on Christmas Eve, about the same time that Beagle was scheduled to land on the surface. Controllers must make a complicated series of maneuvers before it will be in the correct orbit to contact the lander.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
Britain's Beagle 2 Mars lander remained silent for a third day yesterday, and scientists now think that their best hope for receiving a signal is the spacecraft's mother ship. Mars Express, Beagle 2's mother ship produced by the European Space Agency, entered orbit around the Red Planet on Christmas Eve, about the same time that Beagle was scheduled to land on the surface. Controllers must make a complicated series of maneuvers before it will be in the correct orbit to contact the lander.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998
Comsat Corp. said yesterday that it has sold its RSI telecommunications equipment company to TBG Industries Inc. for about $116.5 million.Bethesda-based Comsat announced last March that it would sell RSI to focus on its satellite communications service and digital networking businesses.Comsat provides voice, video and data services through its satellites.Comsat said it will use proceeds from the sale to repay debt. The final price may be adjusted to take into account loans and advances from Comsat to RSI.Comsat has carried RSI on its books as discontinued operations since June.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | March 26, 2000
GREEN BANK, W.Va. -- The world's largest machine on dry land seems out of place in the rugged isolation of Deer Creek Valley. But this patch of scarce flatland, sparsely populated and surrounded by the Allegheny Mountains, is the ideal home for the gleaming white two-acre radio telescope that looms above neighboring farms. For four decades, this remote Pocahontas County hamlet has been "the center of American radio astronomy," explained Mark McKinnon, deputy site director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory facility at Green Bank.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 11, 2001
Putting a man on the moon may have been the most wondrous event of the 20th century - a fact we tend to forget sometimes, given the rapid march of technology over the past two decades. It's becoming harder and harder to amaze this computer-savvy world, where the impossible seems to happen almost daily. But back in 1969, when computers were still the size of a living room and PC was a meaningless acronym, the spectacle of watching Neil Armstrong walk on the moon left a world holding its breath.
TRAVEL
By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | October 3, 2004
Tip No. 1 for a trip to Green Bank, W.Va.: Pack lots of CDs. If you hit the "scan" button on your car radio, all you will get is an endless display of numbers as the radio searches vainly for a station. There aren't any. There isn't much else out here in east-central West Virginia, either -- just an occasional farm, a logging truck or, scampering back into the Monongahela National Forest, a deer. The trip here, via routes 55 and 28, winds up into the clouds where snakes of mist curl around the road.
NEWS
December 31, 1991
A NASA astronomer said yesterday that he tried and failed Dec. 20 to use the world's largest radio telescope to get a radar image of a puzzling, asteroidlike object that passed within 288,000 miles of Earth.Astronomers had hoped the observation would settle the question of whether the object -- which is circling the sun in an orbit slightly larger than that of the Earth -- is a highly unusual asteroid or a piece of booster rocket somehow tossed out of Earth orbit.Instead, the tiny object, which may be less than 20 feet long, remains a mystery.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 11, 2001
Putting a man on the moon may have been the most wondrous event of the 20th century - a fact we tend to forget sometimes, given the rapid march of technology over the past two decades. It's becoming harder and harder to amaze this computer-savvy world, where the impossible seems to happen almost daily. But back in 1969, when computers were still the size of a living room and PC was a meaningless acronym, the spectacle of watching Neil Armstrong walk on the moon left a world holding its breath.
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | March 26, 2000
GREEN BANK, W.Va. -- The world's largest machine on dry land seems out of place in the rugged isolation of Deer Creek Valley. But this patch of scarce flatland, sparsely populated and surrounded by the Allegheny Mountains, is the ideal home for the gleaming white two-acre radio telescope that looms above neighboring farms. For four decades, this remote Pocahontas County hamlet has been "the center of American radio astronomy," explained Mark McKinnon, deputy site director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory facility at Green Bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | May 24, 1999
Want to join the global hunt for E.T.? All you need is a PC. Last week a small band of scientists involved in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) unveiled free software that turns home computers into alien trackers. The software, called SETI@home, runs on both Windows- and Macintosh-based machines and works like a screen saver. Instead of showering the screen with flying toasters when the computer is idle, the software plucks data representing raw signals from a SETI radio telescope in Puerto Rico and combs the numbers for signs of alien communiques.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998
Comsat Corp. said yesterday that it has sold its RSI telecommunications equipment company to TBG Industries Inc. for about $116.5 million.Bethesda-based Comsat announced last March that it would sell RSI to focus on its satellite communications service and digital networking businesses.Comsat provides voice, video and data services through its satellites.Comsat said it will use proceeds from the sale to repay debt. The final price may be adjusted to take into account loans and advances from Comsat to RSI.Comsat has carried RSI on its books as discontinued operations since June.
NEWS
September 28, 1994
IT SOUNDS like something that lives in Australia and carries its offspring about in unorthodox fashion. But astronomers report that a Dwingeloo is actually a distant cosmic cousin to our own Milky Way galaxy, a previously undiscovered spiral disc of a billion or so stars lurking just out of sight behind the clouds of dust and gas that swirl around our island universe.Dubbed Dwingeloo 1, the new galaxy was detected last month with the large radio telescope in Dwingeloo, The Netherlands, by a team of Dutch, British and American astronomers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 21, 2001
"The Dish," a charming nougat of a film about a giant radio telescope stuck in the middle of nowheresville, Australia, used to beam back pictures of Neil Armstrong landing on the moon, is this weekend's offering for Cinema Sundays at the Charles Theatre. Based on real events, the film stars Sam Neill as the scientist in charge of the 1,000-ton telescope. The film was directed by Rob Sitch. Pierre Bely, chief engineer for the Next Generation Space Telescope, will serve as host for the screening, which begins at 10:30 a.m. Admission to Cinema Sundays is $15; four-film mini-memberships are available for $52. Free bagels and coffee will be served.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2000
Scientists from around the world are rotating arrays of radio telescopes toward Mars in an effort to confirm that a weak, mysterious signal -- about the strength of a cell phone call -- has been received from the $165 million Mars Polar Lander. "We are continuing to review the data," Mary Hardin, a spokeswoman for NASA's suddenly rejuvenated Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said yesterday. "In the meantime, we are using radio telescopes in England, Italy and the Netherlands to help us listen."
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