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By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
The Maryland-based Calvert Foundation and two other organizations unveiled yesterday an investment program to provide help for public radio stations, some of which are financially strapped, as well as money to acquire new ones. The Public Radio Fund will be the largest capital-raising effort ever attempted for noncommercial radio, said a statement announcing its launch. Other backers of the fund are New York's Ford Foundation and Public Radio Capital, a nonprofit in Denver. The Calvert Foundation, which has its headquarters in Bethesda, has primarily focused on helping disadvantaged communities.
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FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
Allan Prell was back on the radio the other night and, as he might say, it was a glorious occasion. He laughed riotously at his own jokes. He made fun of callers foolish enough to share details of their personal lives. And he was oh so naughty. Baltimore remembers naughty Allan. His provocative and often hilarious morning talk show aired on WBAL Radio from 1982 to 1999. Since then, he's worked for stations in Denver and Seattle, before returning to his home in Northern Virginia. Tuesday night, he filled in on the nationally syndicated Jim Bohannon Show out of Washington.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 3, 2006
A whole new world opened after I bought my first transistor radio. It was all of $6.99 and came from the old Shocket's on Gay Street, a few steps away from the Bel Air Market. It ran on a nine-volt battery, which we always bought on the cheap at Sunny's Surplus. That little plastic radio brought the voice of Alan Field into my room, a broadcast voice that will be on this morning for the final airing of his It's Showtime on WWLG, where he's the Saturday host. Come 9 a.m. Monday, that station will change formats and discontinue the pop music-oldies sound that I've chasing around for the past 46 years.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2006
A glance at your average magazine stand will reveal any number of women's magazines, but the notion of a radio station airing almost nothing but women's voices is rare. And yet on Monday, a Baltimore radio station will begin doing just that. WWLG, which currently specializes in oldies, will get new call letters, WVIE, and a new talk-show format that will feature mostly female hosts. The 50,000-watt station, at 1370 AM, will be home to some of the best-known women in syndicated talk radio, including Dr. Laura Schlessinger, Laura Ingraham, Tammy Bruce, Dr. Joy Browne and the Satellite Sisters.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Startled fans of National Public Radio stations and Christian broadcasts at the low end of the FM dial are complaining that satellite shock-jock Howard Stern has burst in on their morning drive-time listening. "Usually they're upset, because they don't know what's going on. This isn't what they tuned in to [hear]," said Charles W. Loughery, president of the Word FM Radio Network, a group of "contemporary Christian" stations in eastern Pennsylvania. Normal car radios can't pick up signals from satellite-based subscription services such as Sirius, which carries Howard Stern's show.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
A ripple of indignation spread across the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday over news that its student-run radio station, which has been broadcasting since 1937, might be unceremoniously forced off the air by a more powerful station in Baltimore. The college station, WMUC, issued an appeal to alumni to help it retain its signal, currently powered by just 10 watts and available within a radius of only a few miles of the 1,200-acre campus. University officials said they had met with lawyers to determine the station's legal options.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
When Andy Bienstock first went to work in a radio station at the Johns Hopkins University in 1980, the tiny, three-room studio was in a dormitory basement, next to the laundry room and beneath a snack shop. The hum of the dryers next door was muffled by a wall of egg cartons -- rudimentary but effective sound-proofing. The 10-watt station, then known as WJHU, was far from being a radio powerhouse. "On a good day we could reach Northern Parkway," Bienstock recalled. "There was nothing glamorous about it, but it was more fun than you can imagine."
NEWS
By JODY K. VILSCHICK | February 12, 2006
There is nothing more upsetting than being caught in a backup and tuning in to the traffic report, only to hear mentioned every incident but the one apparently causing the backup I'm in. If, like me, you want to inform your favorite radio station about the backup so it will be mentioned in the next traffic report, you might be driving in the dark - most motorists don't have radio stations' toll-free traffic hot lines memorized or the numbers on their...
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEVEN BARRIE-ANTHONY and STEVEN BARRIE-ANTHONY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2006
OAKLAND, Calif. - In the beginning, there was music. Childhood and young adulthood floated by to a soundtrack of lyrics and rhythms and searing guitar riffs that consumed you, became you, constituted your identity, galvanized your intent, spoke your soul. But time passes, classrooms fade to cubicles, and a vast landscape of new music turns foreign and unexplored. For Jeff Hersh, 31, the stereo came to double as Proust's madeleine, its purpose to invoke memories rather than create them.
NEWS
By JODY K. VILSCHICK | February 5, 2006
What kind of driver are you? Do you depend on radio stations to provide you traffic information for your commute? Or do you just head out, pump up your favorite tunes and hope for the best? If you depend on the State Highway Administration's variable message signs to be your only source of information, the resounding message in Traffic Talk's inbox last week was: Don't. Mike Singer was one of those who responded to last week's column on variable message signs along Interstate 95; he suggested that Mark Middlebusher, who had questioned the placement of the variable message signs, and "other D.C.-area commuters," should listen to WTOP 1500 AM. Mr. Singer acknowledged that he listens to the radio station for traffic information every day. Mr. Middlebusher confirmed that he is a fan of WTOP and has entered the station's phone number on his cell phone's speed dial.
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