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NEWS
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,New York Times News Service | July 15, 2007
SYLVA, N.C. -- Another noon hour is drawing to a close at the small radio station beside the railroad track, 680 on the AM dial, your home for today's hits and yesterday's favorites. Listeners have heard the news, weather, sports and a reminder to visit Andy Shaw Ford, across from the Wal-Mart. It's time again for that thousand-watt form of communion, Tradio. The host, Dennis the Menace, leans toward the microphone the way he might to confide in his life's companion. His voice, chain-smoker deep, assumes the broadcasting cadence that tries to evoke folksy familiarity but somehow comes out sounding like God trying hard to just shoot the breeze.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 5, 2007
For many people, getting away for a holiday means sitting in traffic while listening to radio reports about rubbernecking delays and cascading backups. But during the next few days, as Americans extend their Fourth of July celebrations, tens of thousands of motorists around the country will receive up-to-the minute accident alerts and guidance on end runs around bottlenecks -- without having to turn on a car radio. In the latest incarnation of traffic reporting, information gleaned from cameras, road-top sensors, electronic tollbooths and eyewitnesses is edited in Mission Control-style command rooms and sent out via personalized text or voice messages to subscribers' cell phones or BlackBerrys, often at no charge.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | May 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With compact disc sales tumbling, record companies and musicians are looking at a new potential pot of money: royalties from broadcast radio stations. For years, stations have paid royalties to composers and publishers when they played their songs. But they enjoy a federal exemption when paying the performers and record labels because, they argue, the airplay sells music. Now the Recording Industry Association of America and several artists' groups are preparing to push Congress to repeal the exemption, a move that could generate hundreds of millions of dollars annually in new royalties.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | April 12, 2007
More than 600 new radio stations have come to America's airwaves in the past three years - and you probably haven't noticed. Fewer than a half-million Americans use a new technology called HD radio, which was invented by a Maryland company. It gives listeners a host of new options. But that may soon change, as HD radio sets are getting cheaper and broadcasters are launching an all-out campaign to draw listeners. "We're in the early stages of a major technological transition," said Robert J. Struble, president and chief executive of Ibiquity Digital Corp.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Some mom-and-pop and public Internet radio stations are worried that new royalty fees could put them out of business or hinder the amount of music content they can afford to broadcast. A decision this month by the Copyright Royalty Board, a three-member panel of judges under the Library of Congress, would significantly increase what radio companies pay to air music over the Internet. The added fees, which are paid to both performers and their labels, could fundamentally change the burgeoning Internet radio industry.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 8, 2007
I really enjoy listening over the Internet to radio station KKJZ in Long Beach, Calif. I stream it through the Windows Media Player, where it is one of a great number of items, including songs, play lists and videos. There must be an easier way to get to that one station than click on find URL, find favorites, browse favorites, then find the KKJZ file among all the files and click on it. - Wayne S. Shapiro, aol.com There is a way to put that radio station a single mouse-click away using a drag-and-drop technique favored by some folks who are utterly committed to accessing a single spot on the Internet and don't want to wade through bookmarks either in the Web browser or in the music player software.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager and Ray Frager,Sun reporter | February 27, 2007
When Orioles vice president Jim Duquette appeared on The Mark Viviano Show yesterday, he did something on ESPN Radio 1300 (WJFK/1300 AM) that he couldn't do on other radio stations in town - take questions from listeners. Last week, sports talk host Steve Davis of WBAL (1090 AM) went public with what he characterized as an Orioles-imposed ban on call-in questions for club management when on stations not owned by Orioles rights-holder CBS Radio. But a top manager at CBS Radio - whose WHFS (105.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | February 3, 2007
Beginning Tuesday, fans of Good Morning Maryland, the wake-up show on WMAR's Channel 2, won't have to interrupt their viewing of the program as they head off to work. They can turn on their car radio and keep listening. A new partnership between WMAR and radio stations WCBM-AM 680 and WVIE-AM 1370 will mean not only a daily two-hour simulcast of Good Morning Maryland beginning at 4:55 a.m. on WVIE but weather reports and, as the occasion warrants, news stories shared among all three stations throughout the day. "It helps us expand our Good Morning Maryland team and expose them potentially to more viewers and listeners," said Bill Hooper, general manager of WMAR, who was promoted to the position two weeks ago. "Both of those radio stations are news-talk and information-based, and their audiences are the kind of people who are going to be looking for that in television."
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2007
The Orioles wanted creative control of all pre- and post-game programming on WBAL Radio (1090 AM), and the station's objection to that was a major reason its 19-year relationship with the club ended, said WBAL vice president and station manager Jeff Beauchamp. The Orioles counter that between a clearer FM signal on WHFS (105.7), the ability to promote the club on five different stations, a strong investment in high-definition radio and creative ideas for pre- and post-game content, CBS Radio offered too good a package to turn down.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2006
Citing widespread interference on broadcast frequencies used by its member stations, National Public Radio has asked the Federal Communications Commission to order recalls of millions of FM modulators that drivers use to play satellite radios and iPods through their car stereos. A field study by NPR Labs found that nearly 40 percent of those devices have signal strengths that exceed FCC limits, enabling them to break into FM broadcasts in nearby cars with unwanted programming. A separate investigation by the National Association of Broadcasters found that more than 75 percent of the devices it tested violated the power limits.
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