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Radio Stations

NEWS
June 15, 2008
Radio stations open in county As Harford County increased in population, the need for dissemination of local news and business advertising gave rise to three radio stations within the county. The first was WASA-AM with 5,000 watts of power and was managed by the Chesapeake Broadcasting Corporation near Havre de Grace. The second station, WASA-FM with 3,000 watts of power under the same management, went on the air June 19, 1960. The Bel Air Broadcasting Corporation, launched the third station, WVOB, on June 11, 1965 with 250 watts of power.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 18, 2008
LaFontaine Oliver swears he started to tweak the programming at WEAA-FM (88.9) months before Marc Steiner got fired. It was, he says, part of his long-term mission to increase news and public affairs programming at Morgan State University's radio station. Still, if disaffected WYPR-FM (88.1) listeners want to sample his station's offerings -- if they want to follow Steiner across town to what will be, beginning tomorrow, his new radio home -- Oliver's not going to complain. "It wasn't so much a conscious effort to woo those folks, as much as the stars sort of aligned," says Oliver, WEAA's general manager for the past 15 months.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun reporter | May 10, 2008
Months of tumult at public radio station WYPR, beginning with the Feb. 1 firing of veteran talk-show host Marc Steiner, have not led to a decline in its audience. In fact, the number of people listening to the station in the first three months of year has increased over the same period last year, from 153,600 to 166,800, ratings from Columbia-based Arbitron Inc. show. But they also show the station has lost a significant portion of its younger listeners. In the noon-2 p.m. time slot, where Sun columnist Dan Rodricks took over for Steiner beginning Feb. 25, the weekly average of listeners ages 25 to 54 declined 44 percent, from 25,300 to 14,100.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | February 26, 2008
Brian Billick said yesterday that he still has never been given an explanation for why he was fired as Ravens coach by owner Steve Bisciotti on Dec. 31, a day after the Ravens finished their 5-11 season. In his first expansive local interviews since being fired, Billick told two Baltimore radio stations - WBAL and ESPN 1300 - "it was a shock" to be dismissed because he got a commitment from the team that he would return for the 2008 season. "It did change, and it changed in a day," Billick said.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and Jill Rosen and John Woestendiek and Jill Rosen,Sun reporters | February 2, 2008
Marc Steiner, whose radio talk show became a forum for Baltimore and Maryland civic affairs in recent years, was taken off the air yesterday by public radio station WYPR, which blamed sagging ratings. Barbara Bozzuto, WYPR board chairman, said in an interview that Steiner and management had been at odds over what direction his show should take - and that his show's time period was the only one for which ratings at the station had declined. Steiner, in an interview, said that was "baloney."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | December 17, 2007
The weekly local political roundtable is in full swing and the discussion is heating up: The farmlands of southern Anne Arundel County are fading. People trying to escape sprawl are being pushed out to West Virginia. Soil erosion and nutrient runoff are polluting and degrading the bay. "The Chesapeake Bay Foundation, are you listening?" asks Erik Michelsen, one of the impassioned voices at tiny 97.5 WRYR-FM radio in Churchton. Michelsen's show hits the airwaves for an hour on Saturday mornings, and Charles "Big Daddy" Stallings, a Baltimore blues artist, presses lips to his harmonica on Tuesday nights.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 9, 2007
Continuous Christmas music. Celebrities recalling their favorite holiday moments. Reports from the heartland of America, filled with snow and mistletoe and loads of good cheer. All are fine and good ways to commemorate Christmas, but what do they have to do with celebrating the season here in Maryland? That's what WBAL-AM's John Patti remembers thinking about two years ago, as his radio station was about to broadcast the same hourslong Christmas Day program available to stations across the country.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
In The World Without Us, Alan Weisman asks a deceptively simple question: What would the Earth be like if we humans suddenly vanished from its face? Gathering information from scientists, naturalists, engineers and maintenance workers, he leaves neither mammoth nor microbe unconsidered in his search for the answers. There may be no humans left in his book, but there are plenty reading it. The World has been on best-seller lists for weeks and has ranked as high as No. 6 on Amazon. Why has it struck such a chord?
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Turn the radio dial these days and hear show host Troy Duran talking up buying opportunities in stocks of little-known companies that mine gold, uranium and more obscure minerals like molybdenum. Or hear Bob and David Hanson on another program saying that now is the time to buy that vacation home or investment property. But Duran is not an investment professional, and the Hansons aren't impartial experts. Their shows are paid advertisements. Increasingly, this is the sound of talk radio.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The songs remained the same on Internet radio yesterday, as many stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty increase that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to Web casters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates. That amounted to a reprieve for Internet radio stations, some of which had warned they would have to shut down Sunday when a major increase in music royalties and fees kicked in. "Each company has had to decide how they want to act on their own, but I think it's pretty clear that SoundExchange is not going to go after people providing they are trying to work it out," said Tim Westergren, founder of Pandora Media Inc., which operates one of the largest Internet radio sites from Oakland, Calif.
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