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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 19, 1998
Democratic state comptroller candidate and former Gov. William Donald Schaefer is to take to the airwaves today on radio stations across Maryland in a series of advertisements with the theme "integrity, experience, independence."Four ads are to run in rotation several times a day on 17 radio stations throughout the state until the Nov. 3 election at a cost of more than $50,000, according to Schaefer campaign spokesman Michael D. Golden.In one ad, an announcer notes Schaefer's decades of public service and says, "He will respond to the best interests of the people of the state and not political pressures.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | October 17, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Station WXPN-FM's (88.5) "World Cafe" is making its way into the world.Actually, it only goes to five other public radio stations, in such far-flung outposts as Duluth, Minn., Laramie, Wyo., and Spindale, N.C. Even so, public radio executives from here to Hawaii are watching response to the program, which began national broadcast on Monday.The reason is simple. If "World Cafe," with host David Dye and his eclectic mix of rhythm and blues, acoustic rock and just-out-of-the-box pop, takes hold outside Philadelphia, it could sow the seed of the biggest boon to public radio in years.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The songs remained the same on Internet radio yesterday, as many stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty increase that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to Web casters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates. That amounted to a reprieve for Internet radio stations, some of which had warned they would have to shut down Sunday when a major increase in music royalties and fees kicked in. "Each company has had to decide how they want to act on their own, but I think it's pretty clear that SoundExchange is not going to go after people providing they are trying to work it out," said Tim Westergren, founder of Pandora Media Inc., which operates one of the largest Internet radio sites from Oakland, Calif.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 31, 1999
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Yahoo! Inc. planned to stop using RealNetworks Inc.'s software to play audio and video on its broadcast site before reversing its decision, according to radio stations featured on the No. 1 Internet search service's site.The site, which allows users to hear programs from a large number of radio stations, planned to drop RealNetworks' software in favor of Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Media software by tomorrow, said Christa Wessel, Web services director at station WCPE in Wake Forest, N.C. She said the station's contact at Yahoo!
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
Tipper Gore, if she had been at the Baltimore City Council meeting last night, would have been proud.The council overwhelmingly backed a bill to put pressure on local radio stations to quash offensive lyrics that demean women and glorify violence. Mrs. Gore, wife of Vice President Al Gore, has led a tireless crusade against explicit song lyrics.The bill, introduced by 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes, calls for a task force to study ways to get radio stations to agree voluntarily not to play songs with suggestive lyrics.
BUSINESS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 2, 1991
Hearst Broadcasting named new general managers for its Baltimore television and radio stations yesterday.Philip M. Stolz, 43, was named general manager of WBAL-TV (Channel 11). Edward C. Kiernan, 42, is the new general manager of the WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM radio stations. The two replace David Barrett, who was promoted last month to deputy director of all Hearst Broadcasting properties.Mr. Stolz comes to Channel 11 from WDTN-TV, the ABC affiliate in Dayton, Ohio, where he was general manager.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it has offered more than $500 million for some broadcasting stations and is negotiating other purchases.The Baltimore-based operator of radio and television stations didn't identify the companies with which it's in talks or whether the bid is for TV, radio stations or both.Sinclair has been expanding its broadcasting operations to take advantage of new limits on station ownership in the United States.Sinclair said it hasn't entered into any agreements or letters of intent for the stations.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Fans of Internet radio: Stay tuned. In an eagerly awaited decision, the U.S. Copyright Office yesterday rejected a proposed royalty on online music that threatened to put many Internet broadcasters out of business. The copyright office now has until June 20 to make a final decision on how much Internet radio stations must pay recording artists and labels for playing their music. "I'm happy, but it's a mixed blessing," said Gregor Markowitz, who runs the online folk station Hober.com in Takoma Park.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s decision to sell off the bulk of its radio stations will allow the Baltimore company to whittle down its debt and focus on television, analysts said yesterday.Radio comprises a relatively small share of Sinclair's bottom line. The company's money derives largely from its role as a major holder of television stations, especially medium-market affiliates of upstart networks Fox, UPN and the WB Network. Locally, Sinclair owns Fox station WBFF-45 and programs the WB Network's WNUV-54.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Some mom-and-pop and public Internet radio stations are worried that new royalty fees could put them out of business or hinder the amount of music content they can afford to broadcast. A decision this month by the Copyright Royalty Board, a three-member panel of judges under the Library of Congress, would significantly increase what radio companies pay to air music over the Internet. The added fees, which are paid to both performers and their labels, could fundamentally change the burgeoning Internet radio industry.
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