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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 31, 1999
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Yahoo! Inc. planned to stop using RealNetworks Inc.'s software to play audio and video on its broadcast site before reversing its decision, according to radio stations featured on the No. 1 Internet search service's site.The site, which allows users to hear programs from a large number of radio stations, planned to drop RealNetworks' software in favor of Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Media software by tomorrow, said Christa Wessel, Web services director at station WCPE in Wake Forest, N.C. She said the station's contact at Yahoo!
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BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | February 3, 2007
Beginning Tuesday, fans of Good Morning Maryland, the wake-up show on WMAR's Channel 2, won't have to interrupt their viewing of the program as they head off to work. They can turn on their car radio and keep listening. A new partnership between WMAR and radio stations WCBM-AM 680 and WVIE-AM 1370 will mean not only a daily two-hour simulcast of Good Morning Maryland beginning at 4:55 a.m. on WVIE but weather reports and, as the occasion warrants, news stories shared among all three stations throughout the day. "It helps us expand our Good Morning Maryland team and expose them potentially to more viewers and listeners," said Bill Hooper, general manager of WMAR, who was promoted to the position two weeks ago. "Both of those radio stations are news-talk and information-based, and their audiences are the kind of people who are going to be looking for that in television."
NEWS
January 15, 1997
ANNAPOLIS DID NOT have a local radio station until after World War II. But starting in December 1946, it got three within a few months. GIs were back from battle overseas, the economy was booming and Maryland's state capital was buzzing with optimism.WANN-AM, 1190 on the dial, was actually the second station to go on the air. After some early experimentation with formats, owner Morris H. Blum decided that the station's ticket to success would be to broadcast to an African-American audience whose needs were not being met by any area station.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1995
Tipper Gore, if she had been at the Baltimore City Council meeting last night, would have been proud.The council overwhelmingly backed a bill to put pressure on local radio stations to quash offensive lyrics that demean women and glorify violence. Mrs. Gore, wife of Vice President Al Gore, has led a tireless crusade against explicit song lyrics.The bill, introduced by 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes, calls for a task force to study ways to get radio stations to agree voluntarily not to play songs with suggestive lyrics.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1997
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it has offered more than $500 million for some broadcasting stations and is negotiating other purchases.The Baltimore-based operator of radio and television stations didn't identify the companies with which it's in talks or whether the bid is for TV, radio stations or both.Sinclair has been expanding its broadcasting operations to take advantage of new limits on station ownership in the United States.Sinclair said it hasn't entered into any agreements or letters of intent for the stations.
BUSINESS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 2, 1991
Hearst Broadcasting named new general managers for its Baltimore television and radio stations yesterday.Philip M. Stolz, 43, was named general manager of WBAL-TV (Channel 11). Edward C. Kiernan, 42, is the new general manager of the WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM radio stations. The two replace David Barrett, who was promoted last month to deputy director of all Hearst Broadcasting properties.Mr. Stolz comes to Channel 11 from WDTN-TV, the ABC affiliate in Dayton, Ohio, where he was general manager.
BUSINESS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Fans of Internet radio: Stay tuned. In an eagerly awaited decision, the U.S. Copyright Office yesterday rejected a proposed royalty on online music that threatened to put many Internet broadcasters out of business. The copyright office now has until June 20 to make a final decision on how much Internet radio stations must pay recording artists and labels for playing their music. "I'm happy, but it's a mixed blessing," said Gregor Markowitz, who runs the online folk station Hober.com in Takoma Park.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc.'s decision to sell off the bulk of its radio stations will allow the Baltimore company to whittle down its debt and focus on television, analysts said yesterday.Radio comprises a relatively small share of Sinclair's bottom line. The company's money derives largely from its role as a major holder of television stations, especially medium-market affiliates of upstart networks Fox, UPN and the WB Network. Locally, Sinclair owns Fox station WBFF-45 and programs the WB Network's WNUV-54.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | March 20, 2007
Some mom-and-pop and public Internet radio stations are worried that new royalty fees could put them out of business or hinder the amount of music content they can afford to broadcast. A decision this month by the Copyright Royalty Board, a three-member panel of judges under the Library of Congress, would significantly increase what radio companies pay to air music over the Internet. The added fees, which are paid to both performers and their labels, could fundamentally change the burgeoning Internet radio industry.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | April 15, 1992
Seoul students rally, allege U.S. plot in '49Hundreds of students, shouting "Yankee go home," held rallies yesterday to protest alleged U.S. involvement in the assassination of a revered Korean patriot more than 40 years ago.About 50 students delivered a letter to the U.S. Embassy demanding that Washington investigate and disclose details of the 1949 slaying of Kim Ku, who led opposition to Japanese colonial rule. An embassy spokesman declined comment.Meanwhile, the Defense Ministry announced that it arrested three soldiers in connection with illegal military absentee balloting in last month's parliamentary elections.
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