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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1997
Continuing its rapid growth strategy, Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it will buy Heritage Media Group's six television and 24 radio stations for $630 million in cash.The Baltimore-based operator of radio and television stations said the deal is subject to regulatory approval and would not take place until the first quarter of 1998. Australian-based News Corp. Ltd. is in the process of purchasing Heritage Media Group, which also provides supermarket coupons and promotions, for $1.35 billion.
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BUSINESS
August 29, 1997
SFX Broadcast Inc., a New York-based operator of radio stations, said yesterday that it will buy three Nashville, Tenn., radio stations for $35 million from Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcasting Group, Inc.The stations are WJZC-FM, WLAC-FM, and WLAC-AM.Upon completion of the sale, Sinclair will own 31 radio stations. It also has agreements to buy 24 others.Patrick Talamantes, Sinclair's director of corporate finance, declined to say why the company decided to sell the Nashville stations.Sinclair Broadcast Group, which operates 29 TV stations, announced last week that it plans to raise $290 million from stock offerings to finance an expansion that includes the purchase of Heritage Media Group's television and radio stations.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 1991
At 8:45 Friday morning, with rain falling out of a leaden sky, Johnny Dark's upper lip starts to quiver in spite of itself."I'm OK," he says, but then his eyes start to betray him, and he removes his glasses and dabs at them with a handkerchief."
NEWS
June 15, 2008
Radio stations open in county As Harford County increased in population, the need for dissemination of local news and business advertising gave rise to three radio stations within the county. The first was WASA-AM with 5,000 watts of power and was managed by the Chesapeake Broadcasting Corporation near Havre de Grace. The second station, WASA-FM with 3,000 watts of power under the same management, went on the air June 19, 1960. The Bel Air Broadcasting Corporation, launched the third station, WVOB, on June 11, 1965 with 250 watts of power.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a move likely to raise hackles in Congress, a staff report by the Federal Communications Commission recommended that a single company be allowed to buy as many radio stations in a city as it wanted until it had 25 percent of the audience.In a highly fragmented market such as New York City, for example, a company could own four of the largest stations, or many more smaller stations, without exceeding the 25 percent limit.In small markets with fewer than eight radio stations, the proposal specifies that a company could buy as many as four of the licenses.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 19, 1998
Democratic state comptroller candidate and former Gov. William Donald Schaefer is to take to the airwaves today on radio stations across Maryland in a series of advertisements with the theme "integrity, experience, independence."Four ads are to run in rotation several times a day on 17 radio stations throughout the state until the Nov. 3 election at a cost of more than $50,000, according to Schaefer campaign spokesman Michael D. Golden.In one ad, an announcer notes Schaefer's decades of public service and says, "He will respond to the best interests of the people of the state and not political pressures.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | October 17, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Station WXPN-FM's (88.5) "World Cafe" is making its way into the world.Actually, it only goes to five other public radio stations, in such far-flung outposts as Duluth, Minn., Laramie, Wyo., and Spindale, N.C. Even so, public radio executives from here to Hawaii are watching response to the program, which began national broadcast on Monday.The reason is simple. If "World Cafe," with host David Dye and his eclectic mix of rhythm and blues, acoustic rock and just-out-of-the-box pop, takes hold outside Philadelphia, it could sow the seed of the biggest boon to public radio in years.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | July 17, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The songs remained the same on Internet radio yesterday, as many stations continued to stream music while their representatives negotiated to lower a controversial royalty increase that took effect over the weekend. With talks progressing, SoundExchange, the organization that collects royalties for musicians and record companies, indicated to Web casters that it wouldn't seek immediate payment of the higher rates. That amounted to a reprieve for Internet radio stations, some of which had warned they would have to shut down Sunday when a major increase in music royalties and fees kicked in. "Each company has had to decide how they want to act on their own, but I think it's pretty clear that SoundExchange is not going to go after people providing they are trying to work it out," said Tim Westergren, founder of Pandora Media Inc., which operates one of the largest Internet radio sites from Oakland, Calif.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 31, 1999
SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Yahoo! Inc. planned to stop using RealNetworks Inc.'s software to play audio and video on its broadcast site before reversing its decision, according to radio stations featured on the No. 1 Internet search service's site.The site, which allows users to hear programs from a large number of radio stations, planned to drop RealNetworks' software in favor of Microsoft Corp.'s Windows Media software by tomorrow, said Christa Wessel, Web services director at station WCPE in Wake Forest, N.C. She said the station's contact at Yahoo!
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | February 3, 2007
Beginning Tuesday, fans of Good Morning Maryland, the wake-up show on WMAR's Channel 2, won't have to interrupt their viewing of the program as they head off to work. They can turn on their car radio and keep listening. A new partnership between WMAR and radio stations WCBM-AM 680 and WVIE-AM 1370 will mean not only a daily two-hour simulcast of Good Morning Maryland beginning at 4:55 a.m. on WVIE but weather reports and, as the occasion warrants, news stories shared among all three stations throughout the day. "It helps us expand our Good Morning Maryland team and expose them potentially to more viewers and listeners," said Bill Hooper, general manager of WMAR, who was promoted to the position two weeks ago. "Both of those radio stations are news-talk and information-based, and their audiences are the kind of people who are going to be looking for that in television."
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