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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1999
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., a Baltimore broadcasting company that has become a significant national owner and operator of radio and television stations, said yesterday that it is considering selling or spinning off its radio properties.In a statement released after the close of the stock markets, Sinclair said it is "actively exploring options with respect to its group of radio stations." The company said it would consider an outright sale of Sinclair's radio stations or the creation of a radio-only subsidiary.
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BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1998
Jacor Communications Inc. will end up with three Baltimore radio stations as part of a $620 million merger deal approved by federal regulators yesterday, giving the Covington, Ky., company its first foothold in the Baltimore market.Jacor will assume control of Baltimore's WOCT-104.3 FM and WCAO-600 AM. In exchange, Jacor will relinquish stations in Minneapolis and Columbus, Ohio, to CBS Radio.The trade is part of an agreement to sell or swap eight of its stations to settle antitrust concerns raised by its acquisition of Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide Communication Inc.Jacor also is acquiring WPOC-93.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | May 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With compact disc sales tumbling, record companies and musicians are looking at a new potential pot of money: royalties from broadcast radio stations. For years, stations have paid royalties to composers and publishers when they played their songs. But they enjoy a federal exemption when paying the performers and record labels because, they argue, the airplay sells music. Now the Recording Industry Association of America and several artists' groups are preparing to push Congress to repeal the exemption, a move that could generate hundreds of millions of dollars annually in new royalties.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
After being hammered for weeks by groups friendly to his Democratic opponent, Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is finally getting some outside help in his bid for governor. The Baltimore chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police is airing a 60-second radio ad in which the widow of a slain city officer urges voters to support Ehrlich. Off-duty Baltimore police and firefighters will also be going door to door in the city to distribute 50,000 pieces of pro-Ehrlich literature before Election Day. The city police and fire unions are also planning to run newspaper ads supporting Ehrlich.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 22, 1991
From "Eve of Destruction" to "Give Peace a Chance" to "God Bless the U.S.A.," there's undoubtedly a popular song to fit whatever sentiment you might have toward the Persian Gulf war. But only a couple of area radio stations have gone out of their way to play them.In fact, during the first week of the war, some stations took the opposite tack, temporarily expunging songs with war references from their play lists. Others have opted to increase their broadcasts of reports from various network radio news services.
NEWS
By JODY K. VILSCHICK | February 5, 2006
What kind of driver are you? Do you depend on radio stations to provide you traffic information for your commute? Or do you just head out, pump up your favorite tunes and hope for the best? If you depend on the State Highway Administration's variable message signs to be your only source of information, the resounding message in Traffic Talk's inbox last week was: Don't. Mike Singer was one of those who responded to last week's column on variable message signs along Interstate 95; he suggested that Mark Middlebusher, who had questioned the placement of the variable message signs, and "other D.C.-area commuters," should listen to WTOP 1500 AM. Mr. Singer acknowledged that he listens to the radio station for traffic information every day. Mr. Middlebusher confirmed that he is a fan of WTOP and has entered the station's phone number on his cell phone's speed dial.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
Patricia Ebbert would like nothing better than to squeeze the sound out of WHFS.For five years, she has asked the courts and other agencies to punish her former employer -- one of the region's most popular radio stations -- for transgressions she claims range from poor management to rigged contests.Now, Ms. Ebbert is asking the Federal Communications Commission to block the Annapolis station's license renewal and give her the 99.1 frequency for a new station. Even as the federal government moves to make such challenges tougher to file in new telecommunications reforms signed into law Thursday, Ms. Ebbert continues her fight.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. announced yesterday that it was selling three New Orleans radio stations to Centennial Broadcasting LLC for $16 million. The sale is subject to approval by the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice, and is expected to close within four months.David Amy, chief financial officer for Baltimore-based Sinclair, said the company is selling the stations "just to comply with regulations," including FCC rules on how many stations one broadcaster can hold in a single market.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1998
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said yesterday that it has completed three deals in a growth spurt that has turned it into one of the nation's largest owners of radio and television stations.In the biggest of the three deals, Sinclair purchased Max Media Properties LLC of Virginia Beach, Va., owner of nine television stations and eight radio stations, for $252 million in cash.The newly acquired properties include two TV stations in the top 75 markets: WKEF, an NBC affiliate in Dayton, Ohio, and WSYT, a Fox affiliate in Syracuse, N.Y. Smaller-market television stations in the deal are in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia, Texas and South Carolina.
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