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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Three local sports talk show hosts -- Stan "The Fan" Charles, Jerry Coleman and Rob Long -- will be without a home at radio station WVIE (1370 AM) as of Friday morning when the station starts moving to a mainly network news/talk format. The official move by V-1370 to news/talk won't come until July 4th when it goes to 12-hours-a-day Monday-through-Friday programming from America's Radio News, a news service based out of Alexandria, Va., that is carried on more than 100 stations nationally.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Three local sports talk show hosts -- Stan "The Fan" Charles, Jerry Coleman and Rob Long -- will be without a home at radio station WVIE (1370 AM) as of Friday morning when the station starts moving to a mainly network news/talk format. The official move by V-1370 to news/talk won't come until July 4th when it goes to 12-hours-a-day Monday-through-Friday programming from America's Radio News, a news service based out of Alexandria, Va., that is carried on more than 100 stations nationally.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
When WBAL Radio broadcast the Baltimore Orioles season-opening games this weekend, it marked more than just the official reunion of two major Maryland institutions that had been synonymous for most of six decades. The return of Orioles baseball to WBAL after four years on the FM dial is also part of a larger move by the 50,000-watt station. It's re-emphasizing its news-and-sports roots after more than a decade featuring highly political talk with the likes of Rush Limbaugh and Chip Franklin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
When WBAL Radio broadcast the Baltimore Orioles season-opening games this weekend, it marked more than just the official reunion of two major Maryland institutions that had been synonymous for most of six decades. The return of Orioles baseball to WBAL after four years on the FM dial is also part of a larger move by the 50,000-watt station. It's re-emphasizing its news-and-sports roots after more than a decade featuring highly political talk with the likes of Rush Limbaugh and Chip Franklin.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
How do you celebrate having put together the country's best radio news story?That's easy, said WBAL News Director Mark Miller, who faced that happy dilemma yesterday when told the Associated Press Broadcasters was handing its Best of Show award to Baltimore's dominant AM station."
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | May 14, 1995
Q: Where can I find information on a 2-foot high Croydon cathedral-style radio?A: To check out or sell any old radio write to Barry Janov, 2454 Dempster St., Suite 416, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016, enclosing a photo or description of the radio, stating its condition and any wording or numbers it has, and including a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply, offer or free evaluation.Q: I have a six-pack carton (slightly torn) and an empty beer can from the Goebel Beer Co. of Detroit. Both are a bit discolored.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 2, 1992
As they used to say in radio: Don't touch that dial.Where would you turn it?The news about radio news in Baltimore: There is none.If Galen Fromme were alive today, this would kill him. Eddie Fenton would be spitting invective into his microphone. Boy, are the angels getting a mouthful from them.A town that once boasted of news operations at all the major stations, where the voices like Fromme and Fenton, and Lou Corbin and Ted Jaffee, and Ron Matz and Alan Berrier and Ted Beinart, were as familiar as family members, is now reduced nearly to the sounds of silence.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Kenneth Manelis, a weekend news anchorman for WBAL-AM radio who was known for his calm demeanor on breaking news stories, died Monday after a short illness at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson.Mr. Manelis, 48, of Pikesville had been with the radio station off and on for nearly 20 years. He last anchored the news the weekend of March 28 and did rush-hour traffic reports early last month.He had worked part time at WBAL since 1990, combining his work as one of the station's newscasters with free-lance announcing duties; part-time, on-air work at Maryland Public Television; and acting jobs.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 15, 2003
Marc Steiner, a man of great energy, seems intent on adding to his already thick portfolio. His latest responsibility, however, may come as a surprise. Steiner, you may recall, was the moving force behind the successful effort to take over WJHU-FM two years ago and keep it locally based. At the station, now renamed WYPR-FM, he's the boss of a new news-gathering shop. He's also the starkly left-of-center talk show host whose program affords Baltimore listeners the rare chance to hear people of widely diverging views discuss matters of public consequence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
Minutes after Joseph P. Walsh Jr. arrived in Dharan, Saudi Arabia, he was phoning his wife at his home here.He had arrived safely, but his luggage was lost.Could she make a quick shopping trip?Deborah Walsh raced out of their Miller Drive home on a crash shopping spree. With freshly packed suitcases in tow, she --ed to Washington, D.C., and gave her husband's new clothes to another Persian Gulf-bound colleague.The lost luggage never materialized, but changes of clothing were the leastof Walsh's problems as he plunged into a round-the-clock job: covering the war and later the peace as a correspondent for Mutual NBC Radio.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 15, 2003
Marc Steiner, a man of great energy, seems intent on adding to his already thick portfolio. His latest responsibility, however, may come as a surprise. Steiner, you may recall, was the moving force behind the successful effort to take over WJHU-FM two years ago and keep it locally based. At the station, now renamed WYPR-FM, he's the boss of a new news-gathering shop. He's also the starkly left-of-center talk show host whose program affords Baltimore listeners the rare chance to hear people of widely diverging views discuss matters of public consequence.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Drive time. Prime time.Brand name? C-SPAN.You can listen in the car, on the computer, or while shoveling snow. You can put it on a Walkman. Now, as easy as you roam the beltway, hear the unfiltered, raw material of government. Untouched by journalists. Listen, unaware of what color of tie Pentagon spokesman Ken Bacon is wearing. Listen, and hear people clearing their throats, stuttering and, later, actually completing their thoughts. No antsy host butts in to commandeer the conversation.Since C-SPAN, the radio, took to the air just over a year ago, it has fast become the local medium of choice for people who can't or won't watch television.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1998
Kenneth Manelis, a weekend news anchorman for WBAL-AM radio who was known for his calm demeanor on breaking news stories, died Monday after a short illness at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson.Mr. Manelis, 48, of Pikesville had been with the radio station off and on for nearly 20 years. He last anchored the news the weekend of March 28 and did rush-hour traffic reports early last month.He had worked part time at WBAL since 1990, combining his work as one of the station's newscasters with free-lance announcing duties; part-time, on-air work at Maryland Public Television; and acting jobs.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | May 14, 1995
Q: Where can I find information on a 2-foot high Croydon cathedral-style radio?A: To check out or sell any old radio write to Barry Janov, 2454 Dempster St., Suite 416, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016, enclosing a photo or description of the radio, stating its condition and any wording or numbers it has, and including a self-addressed, stamped envelope for a reply, offer or free evaluation.Q: I have a six-pack carton (slightly torn) and an empty beer can from the Goebel Beer Co. of Detroit. Both are a bit discolored.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
How do you celebrate having put together the country's best radio news story?That's easy, said WBAL News Director Mark Miller, who faced that happy dilemma yesterday when told the Associated Press Broadcasters was handing its Best of Show award to Baltimore's dominant AM station."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 2, 1992
As they used to say in radio: Don't touch that dial.Where would you turn it?The news about radio news in Baltimore: There is none.If Galen Fromme were alive today, this would kill him. Eddie Fenton would be spitting invective into his microphone. Boy, are the angels getting a mouthful from them.A town that once boasted of news operations at all the major stations, where the voices like Fromme and Fenton, and Lou Corbin and Ted Jaffee, and Ron Matz and Alan Berrier and Ted Beinart, were as familiar as family members, is now reduced nearly to the sounds of silence.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Drive time. Prime time.Brand name? C-SPAN.You can listen in the car, on the computer, or while shoveling snow. You can put it on a Walkman. Now, as easy as you roam the beltway, hear the unfiltered, raw material of government. Untouched by journalists. Listen, unaware of what color of tie Pentagon spokesman Ken Bacon is wearing. Listen, and hear people clearing their throats, stuttering and, later, actually completing their thoughts. No antsy host butts in to commandeer the conversation.Since C-SPAN, the radio, took to the air just over a year ago, it has fast become the local medium of choice for people who can't or won't watch television.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | September 6, 1991
NAME: Alan WaldenCLAIM TO FAME: President of the Patriots of Fort McHenry.WORK LIFE: WBAL radio news anchor and commentator.HOME LIFE: Married to actress Jeannie Houston Walden.PASSIONS: History, Fort McHenry, politics, cats and Miss Jeannie.HEROES: Winston Churchill, George Washington.QUOTE: "Those who cannot remember the past are condemnedto repeat it." -- George Santayana.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
Minutes after Joseph P. Walsh Jr. arrived in Dharan, Saudi Arabia, he was phoning his wife at his home here.He had arrived safely, but his luggage was lost.Could she make a quick shopping trip?Deborah Walsh raced out of their Miller Drive home on a crash shopping spree. With freshly packed suitcases in tow, she --ed to Washington, D.C., and gave her husband's new clothes to another Persian Gulf-bound colleague.The lost luggage never materialized, but changes of clothing were the leastof Walsh's problems as he plunged into a round-the-clock job: covering the war and later the peace as a correspondent for Mutual NBC Radio.
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