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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 22, 2005
Radio Golf - August Wilson's newest play and the final installment in his monumental 10-play cycle - will make its Mid-Atlantic premiere at Center Stage in March. "I wanted this play very badly," artistic director Irene Lewis said in announcing that Radio Golf will replace The Heiress in Center Stage's 2005-2006 season. Set in 1997, Radio Golf concludes Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th-century African-American life, an undertaking Lewis calls "enormous" and "unparalleled." Like most of the plays in the series, Radio Golf is set in Pittsburgh, hometown of the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright.
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 30, 2006
If there was any doubt about the distinctiveness of August Wilson's language and characters, or the breadth of his vision, a trip to Center Stage's production of Radio Golf should quell those doubts. Radio Golf may not be the most exceptional chapter in Wilson's extraordinary decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th-century African-American life. But the play, which is expected to open on Broadway next year, contains rewarding reminders of the works that preceded it and of the greatness of their author, who died in October.
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 19, 2006
THE LAST WEEK IN SEPTEMBER, Kenny Leon got a voice-mail message from August Wilson, whose play, Radio Golf, Leon had directed in Los Angeles. Wilson, who was battling liver cancer, hadn't made it to Leon's production. But plans were under way to bring the production to Seattle, where the playwright lived. "I was in New York working on another play, and I hadn't heard from him that week, and then he called," Leon says. "The voice message was: 'Kenny, it's August, man. I was not feeling well last week and not on my feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2006
MUSIC TENORS AT COPPIN STATE Three Mo' Tenors, an up-and-coming troupe of classically trained African-American vocalists, will perform at the James Walden Johnson Auditorium at Coppin State University on Tuesday in connection with their 2006 national tour. Inspired by the original Three Tenors, Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, Three Mo' Tenors perform traditional operatic music, as well as jazz, gospel, soul, spirituals, new school, Broadway and the blues. ......
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 30, 2006
If there was any doubt about the distinctiveness of August Wilson's language and characters, or the breadth of his vision, a trip to Center Stage's production of Radio Golf should quell those doubts. Radio Golf may not be the most exceptional chapter in Wilson's extraordinary decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th-century African-American life. But the play, which is expected to open on Broadway next year, contains rewarding reminders of the works that preceded it and of the greatness of their author, who died in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2006
MUSIC TENORS AT COPPIN STATE Three Mo' Tenors, an up-and-coming troupe of classically trained African-American vocalists, will perform at the James Walden Johnson Auditorium at Coppin State University on Tuesday in connection with their 2006 national tour. Inspired by the original Three Tenors, Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, Three Mo' Tenors perform traditional operatic music, as well as jazz, gospel, soul, spirituals, new school, Broadway and the blues. ......
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 9, 2005
From the assassinations of Malcolm X and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to an interactive retro prom, Baltimore theatergoers can look forward to the daring and different in 2005-2006. The ways in which stories are told on stage often will be as daring as the stories themselves. For example, in Israeli playwright Motti Lerner's The Murder of Isaac, Rabin's 1995 murder is reenacted by patients suffering from post-traumatic stress, as part of their therapy. The play will make its U.S. and English-language premiere at Center Stage Feb. 3-March 12. Center Stage will also treat its audiences to the mid-Atlantic premiere of August Wilson's Radio Golf (March 24-April 30)
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 29, 2005
On one level, Kenneth Lonergan's Lobby Hero, which takes place in the foyer of a low-rent Manhattan high-rise, is a conventional police drama. It could almost be an episode of NYPD Blue or Law & Order. But on another level, the play - receiving a thought-provoking Baltimore premiere under Stephen B. Thomas' direction at the Top Floor Theatre - is so full of ethical quandaries and relative morality, it could be fodder for a philosophy seminar. This isn't to suggest that Lobby Hero is a didactic script.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 16, 2007
Nineteenth-century German teenagers and Russian intellectuals topped the charts when the 2007 Tony Award nominations were announced in New York yesterday morning. Heading the list with 11 nominations, including best musical, was Spring Awakening, a steamy adaptation of Frank Wedekind's 1891 play about teenage sexuality. It was closely followed by Tom Stoppard's The Coast of Utopia, about a contingent of Russian intelligentsia. The eight-hour trilogy's 10 nominations are the largest number for a nonmusical in Tony history.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
NATIONAL U.S. troops in IraqThe top American ground commander in Iraq said yesterday that he expected no reductions this year in the 135,000 U.S. troops in Iraq, although by March there could be a withdrawal of four or five brigades, as many as 16,000 soldiers. [Page 1a] Ex-Klan leader guilty in 3 deaths Exactly 41 years after three young civil rights workers were ambushed and killed, a Mississippi jury convicted yesterday a one-time Ku Klux Klan leader in the notorious case that horrified the country but had never before reached a state courtroom.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 19, 2006
THE LAST WEEK IN SEPTEMBER, Kenny Leon got a voice-mail message from August Wilson, whose play, Radio Golf, Leon had directed in Los Angeles. Wilson, who was battling liver cancer, hadn't made it to Leon's production. But plans were under way to bring the production to Seattle, where the playwright lived. "I was in New York working on another play, and I hadn't heard from him that week, and then he called," Leon says. "The voice message was: 'Kenny, it's August, man. I was not feeling well last week and not on my feet.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 22, 2005
Radio Golf - August Wilson's newest play and the final installment in his monumental 10-play cycle - will make its Mid-Atlantic premiere at Center Stage in March. "I wanted this play very badly," artistic director Irene Lewis said in announcing that Radio Golf will replace The Heiress in Center Stage's 2005-2006 season. Set in 1997, Radio Golf concludes Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th-century African-American life, an undertaking Lewis calls "enormous" and "unparalleled." Like most of the plays in the series, Radio Golf is set in Pittsburgh, hometown of the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 2006
The Pulitzer Prize board's decision not to give an award in drama this year might seem like a drama in itself. But it is not necessarily a tragedy - except perhaps, for the three nominated playwrights, Christopher Durang, Rolin Jones and Adam Rapp, who lose, besides the honor, the $10,000 check that accompanies the prize. It is also not unprecedented; this is the 15th time the Pulitzers have passed on the theater category. Authorities differ, however, on whether it's a portent about the state of the American stage.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 3, 2005
August Wilson, one of the most accomplished, ambitious and prolific playwrights in the history of the American theater, died yesterday of liver cancer. The 60-year-old playwright had most recently been working on revisions of Radio Golf, the 10th and final play in his monumental, decade-by-decade series chronicling the African-American experience in the 20th century. The cycle - whose plays garnered two Pulitzer Prizes and a host of other awards - stands as an unprecedented achievement.
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