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By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- It's every parent's nightmare: You take your kids to an amusement park, get distracted for a moment and they're gone -- vanished into the crowd. At Paramount's Great America park in Santa Clara, Calif., in late July, Jennifer Winding's 5-year-old nephew ran off to see the Spongebob Squarepants character strolling nearby. Later, her 4-year-old daughter headed in a different direction when she spotted Blue the dog from TV's Blue's Clues. But the watchlike devices the kids had on their wrists helped ease anxiety about losing track of them.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and other utilities in Maryland will make the case to state regulators Tuesday that customers who don't want smart meters should pay an upfront charge and a monthly fee - anywhere from $15 to $87 - to opt out. Smart-meter opponents are ready to argue that those proposed charges are unreasonably high, considering the costs utilities have borne so far from customers deferring meter installations. "It doesn't pass the straight-face test," said Jonathan D. Libber, president of Maryland Smart Meter Awareness, which opposes the technology.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
When Kevin Mitchell sends his son overseas this summer on a school trip, he plans to send him off with a ball cap from a Canadian sports team he's never watched play - a thin disguise he believes will offer protection from thieves and terrorists who target Americans. But Mitchell, head of the Business Travel Coalition, an advocacy group, said that may not be enough on the next trip. Travel groups like his, among others, oppose a State Department plan to embed small computer chips in passports.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
The Maryland Public Service Commission said Monday that it will give energy customers a choice on smart meters, but it hasn't decided yet whether to allow a total opt-out or to make the alternative a smart meter installed in a way to limit radio-frequency emissions. "Although we have not found convincing evidence that smart meters pose any health risks to the public at large, we acknowledge a good-faith belief on the part of some ratepayers to the contrary," the commission said in its order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lorene Yue and Lorene Yue,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2003
An old technology on the cusp of rapid adoption has businesses extolling its money-saving benefits and consumer advocates shuddering at the potential for privacy invasion. The technology is radio frequency identification. Promoted as the successor to bar codes, an RFID is an electronic tag that emits information via radio frequency and can deliver detailed product information to computers. Think of it as LoJack to locate inventory instead of stolen cars. While created more than 30 years ago, the electronic tags are reaching the point of being highly practical to use. Performance has improved, costs have fallen and more retailers are demanding suppliers to adopt the technology.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 8, 2003
There's a chance that an Exxon Mobil Speedpass could shut down a car. There's only a slight chance that will happen, and there's a way to prevent it, so there's no need to banish the Speedpass from the key chain. But the little-known flaw, caused by radio frequency transmissions, shows how the increasing amount of data being sent through the air might create problems. The Speedpass, which was introduced in 1997, uses a tiny chip to transmit customer payment data to the pump at the gas station.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2000
The Columbia Association used a radio frequency for nearly three years after its federal communications license to do so had expired. President Deborah O. McCarty said the association had failed to renew a Federal Communications Commission license that allowed it to use wireless radios, but that employees in the open space division used the frequency anyway for almost three years before her arrival. McCarty said she learned of the problem on her first day on the job in August 1998, and that the use of the radios was stopped.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and other utilities in Maryland will make the case to state regulators Tuesday that customers who don't want smart meters should pay an upfront charge and a monthly fee - anywhere from $15 to $87 - to opt out. Smart-meter opponents are ready to argue that those proposed charges are unreasonably high, considering the costs utilities have borne so far from customers deferring meter installations. "It doesn't pass the straight-face test," said Jonathan D. Libber, president of Maryland Smart Meter Awareness, which opposes the technology.
NEWS
November 28, 2004
THOSE TINY chips remaking our lives at a breakneck pace keep getting tinier, cheaper and much more communicative. An old technology just now making a big splash - radio frequency identification - promises great savings to those trying to keep track of things, but it's also raising privacy advocates' hackles. RFID systems are composed of chips with identifying codes and antennas wrapped around them that can receive radio signals from scanners - that, in turn, are linked to databases. An already prevalent example on the East Coast is the E-Z Pass tags issued to motorists who've set up accounts for highway tolls.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved a bill yesterday that would for the first time allow the government to auction radio frequencies. The frequencies will be used for advanced wireless telephones and other new technologies.The bill, which has heavy support from the White House and is given strong chances of becoming law within the next few months, would bring about a significant change in how the government manages the airwaves.Licenses to use the radio-frequency spectrum -- whether for traditional television and radio broadcasts or for more specialized uses like cellular phone networks -- are collectively worth billions of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
When Kevin Mitchell sends his son overseas this summer on a school trip, he plans to send him off with a ball cap from a Canadian sports team he's never watched play - a thin disguise he believes will offer protection from thieves and terrorists who target Americans. But Mitchell, head of the Business Travel Coalition, an advocacy group, said that may not be enough on the next trip. Travel groups like his, among others, oppose a State Department plan to embed small computer chips in passports.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Nextel Communications Inc. agreed to spend $2.8 billion and give up airwaves worth $2.06 billion in exchange for new spectrum under a U.S. government plan to lessen interference of public safety radios. The airwave swap and other moves such as reprogramming emergency workers' radios will take three years, Robert Foosaner, Nextel's chief regulatory officer, said yesterday at a news conference in Washington. Nextel, which agreed to be bought by Sprint Corp. in December, had until today to accept the Federal Communications Commission's plan.
NEWS
November 28, 2004
THOSE TINY chips remaking our lives at a breakneck pace keep getting tinier, cheaper and much more communicative. An old technology just now making a big splash - radio frequency identification - promises great savings to those trying to keep track of things, but it's also raising privacy advocates' hackles. RFID systems are composed of chips with identifying codes and antennas wrapped around them that can receive radio signals from scanners - that, in turn, are linked to databases. An already prevalent example on the East Coast is the E-Z Pass tags issued to motorists who've set up accounts for highway tolls.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- It's every parent's nightmare: You take your kids to an amusement park, get distracted for a moment and they're gone -- vanished into the crowd. At Paramount's Great America park in Santa Clara, Calif., in late July, Jennifer Winding's 5-year-old nephew ran off to see the Spongebob Squarepants character strolling nearby. Later, her 4-year-old daughter headed in a different direction when she spotted Blue the dog from TV's Blue's Clues. But the watchlike devices the kids had on their wrists helped ease anxiety about losing track of them.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
Matrics Inc., a Rockville-based technology company that makes radio-frequency identification tags used for electronic tracking, has been sold to Symbol Technologies of Holtsville, N.Y., for $230 million. Matrics, a 5-year-old privately held company with 64 employees, has been a pioneer in the rapidly growing market for radio-frequency identification systems, which could someday challenge the bar code as the preferred method for tracking everything from merchandise to airport luggage. The deal will give Symbol, the nation's largest provider of bar code systems, a foothold in a roughly $1 billion market that is growing about 25 percent annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dean Takahashi and Dean Takahashi,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 8, 2004
The next time you wave a key card to unlock the door to your office building, think of Charles Walton. Walton, one of Silicon Valley's unsung inventors, has patents on radio frequency identification, or RFID, that spawned those electronic door keys. Now the technology Walton pioneered in the 1970s and 1980s is poised to change the way billions of products are tracked. Prodded by Wal-Mart and the Pentagon, manufacturers will soon be tagging everything from diapers to combat boots with RFID chips.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
Howard County's push for new, more-powerful frequencies for its public-safety radios will get an extra nudge from U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, she said after meeting with county officials last week.The county's application for the radio frequencies -- which would allow 15 new channels for police, firefighters and other county workers -- is pending before the Federal Communications Commission."I can't tell them to decide yes or no, but I can tell them to decide," Mikulski said Friday, after meeting with County Executive Charles I. Ecker and other county officials for more than an hour.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
Executives at Matrics Inc. may want to tag the world with their technology, but for now, they'll settle for sticking their tags on crates and pallets. The Columbia-based technology company has spent the past several years raising $16 million in venture capital funding and developing radio-frequency identification tags, software and readers that can keep track of thousands of items at a time. Now the company is trying to woo Fortune 500 corporations to use the tags to help manage their supply chains and keep track of items on sales floors.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 8, 2003
There's a chance that an Exxon Mobil Speedpass could shut down a car. There's only a slight chance that will happen, and there's a way to prevent it, so there's no need to banish the Speedpass from the key chain. But the little-known flaw, caused by radio frequency transmissions, shows how the increasing amount of data being sent through the air might create problems. The Speedpass, which was introduced in 1997, uses a tiny chip to transmit customer payment data to the pump at the gas station.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lorene Yue and Lorene Yue,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 31, 2003
An old technology on the cusp of rapid adoption has businesses extolling its money-saving benefits and consumer advocates shuddering at the potential for privacy invasion. The technology is radio frequency identification. Promoted as the successor to bar codes, an RFID is an electronic tag that emits information via radio frequency and can deliver detailed product information to computers. Think of it as LoJack to locate inventory instead of stolen cars. While created more than 30 years ago, the electronic tags are reaching the point of being highly practical to use. Performance has improved, costs have fallen and more retailers are demanding suppliers to adopt the technology.
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