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By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1998
A Baltimore County firefighter was indicted by a county grand jury yesterday and suspended without pay on charges of stealing Fire Department radio equipment, a county fire spokesman said.Phillip Hebert of Owings Mills is accused of stealing two 800-megahertz radios typically used by area firefighters and police to dispatch officials to emergency scenes, said Mark F. Hubbard, battalion chief in the Baltimore County Fire Department.Hubbard said the equipment could have been used to put out false calls for assistance.
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NEWS
June 8, 2008
Troops march through Bel Air World War II came to Harford County as early as November 1940 when the military draft, also known as Selective Service, began. It became routine for folks along major roads to see and hear troop movements day and night. "The Caissons Went Rolling Along," according to the front page headline in the Aegis newspaper when Wednesday, June 3, 1941, a large contingent of soldiers moved through Bel Air from 2 a.m. until 10 a.m. en route from Fort Dix, N.J., to a post in Virginia.
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NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Startled fans of National Public Radio stations and Christian broadcasts at the low end of the FM dial are complaining that satellite shock-jock Howard Stern has burst in on their morning drive-time listening. "Usually they're upset, because they don't know what's going on. This isn't what they tuned in to [hear]," said Charles W. Loughery, president of the Word FM Radio Network, a group of "contemporary Christian" stations in eastern Pennsylvania. Normal car radios can't pick up signals from satellite-based subscription services such as Sirius, which carries Howard Stern's show.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Startled fans of National Public Radio stations and Christian broadcasts at the low end of the FM dial are complaining that satellite shock-jock Howard Stern has burst in on their morning drive-time listening. "Usually they're upset, because they don't know what's going on. This isn't what they tuned in to [hear]," said Charles W. Loughery, president of the Word FM Radio Network, a group of "contemporary Christian" stations in eastern Pennsylvania. Normal car radios can't pick up signals from satellite-based subscription services such as Sirius, which carries Howard Stern's show.
NEWS
June 16, 1993
POLICE LOG* Hickory Ridge: 6200 block of Sunny Spring: A maroon 1988 Eagle Premiere, which was stolen from Baltimore, was recovered between 7:30 a.m. and 8:10 a.m. Saturday.6000 block of Cedar Wood Drive: Someone broke out the driver's side window of a 1981 Honda Accord between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. Friday, and stole $320 in car radio equipment, including a $160 amplifier.* Town Center: 10300 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: Three Acura Legends were stolen from Columbia Mall's parking lot between 7 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Troops march through Bel Air World War II came to Harford County as early as November 1940 when the military draft, also known as Selective Service, began. It became routine for folks along major roads to see and hear troop movements day and night. "The Caissons Went Rolling Along," according to the front page headline in the Aegis newspaper when Wednesday, June 3, 1941, a large contingent of soldiers moved through Bel Air from 2 a.m. until 10 a.m. en route from Fort Dix, N.J., to a post in Virginia.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
In the first of a series of hearings in preparation for the 2000 budget, Carroll County commissioners heard a slew of funding requests yesterday, from a pitch for another kennel worker at the Humane Society to a plea not to kill support for the Civil Air Patrol.The county's Office of Management and Budget proposed giving the patrol $2,500 -- a 50 percent cut. 2000 is the last year in a previously agreed-to plan to phase out its support. The patrol, the only Civil Air Patrol in the state supported by county funds, is scheduled to get nothing the next year.
NEWS
By Tom Worgo and Tom Worgo,Contributing writer | June 26, 1991
a Field Day of voices over the airwaves.Twenty-five members of the Columbia Amateur Radio Association tested radio equipment and honed their skills under simulated emergency conditions at the 18th annual Field Day Saturday and Sunday at Clarksville Elementary.Emergencies simulated included floods, hurricanes, nuclear accidents and plane crashes.Field Day has two objectives.The first is to get as many stations as possible on any of about a dozen legal amateur bands to learn to operate under less than optimum conditions.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
In a move expected to help push radio into the digital age, Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit announced yesterday that the two have agreed to merge. The two companies - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - will become iBiquity Digital Corp. The companies called the combination a "merger of equals," though specific financial terms weren't disclosed. Lucent Technologies Inc., Lucent Digital Radio's parent, will be the venture's biggest investor, followed by Viacom Inc., one of 30 companies backing USA Digital.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Imagine a radio with a screen that shows information about upcoming concerts or pictures of musical artists and their albums. With the creation of iBiquity Digital Corp., officials say such technology could become reality. Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - announced yesterday they had completed their merger after clearance by the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Hugh Panero was driving toward his home near Chevy Chase two years ago when he noticed a strange black device about the size of a small travel iron atop the roof of a car in the next lane. Panero cruised up next to the driver, coaxed him to roll down his window and asked him about the funny-looking gadget. The driver babbled on about how it was an antenna for XM Satellite Radio -- a new service, he said, that beamed 100 channels of music, talk, sports and news from two satellites straight to his car radio with CD-quality sound and reception.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2000
Imagine a radio with a screen that shows information about upcoming concerts or pictures of musical artists and their albums. With the creation of iBiquity Digital Corp., officials say such technology could become reality. Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - announced yesterday they had completed their merger after clearance by the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
In a move expected to help push radio into the digital age, Columbia-based USA Digital Radio Inc. and New Jersey's Lucent Digital Radio unit announced yesterday that the two have agreed to merge. The two companies - both of which develop digital technology for manufacturers of radio equipment - will become iBiquity Digital Corp. The companies called the combination a "merger of equals," though specific financial terms weren't disclosed. Lucent Technologies Inc., Lucent Digital Radio's parent, will be the venture's biggest investor, followed by Viacom Inc., one of 30 companies backing USA Digital.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
In the first of a series of hearings in preparation for the 2000 budget, Carroll County commissioners heard a slew of funding requests yesterday, from a pitch for another kennel worker at the Humane Society to a plea not to kill support for the Civil Air Patrol.The county's Office of Management and Budget proposed giving the patrol $2,500 -- a 50 percent cut. 2000 is the last year in a previously agreed-to plan to phase out its support. The patrol, the only Civil Air Patrol in the state supported by county funds, is scheduled to get nothing the next year.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1998
A Baltimore County firefighter was indicted by a county grand jury yesterday and suspended without pay on charges of stealing Fire Department radio equipment, a county fire spokesman said.Phillip Hebert of Owings Mills is accused of stealing two 800-megahertz radios typically used by area firefighters and police to dispatch officials to emergency scenes, said Mark F. Hubbard, battalion chief in the Baltimore County Fire Department.Hubbard said the equipment could have been used to put out false calls for assistance.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1997
Free at last, two Eastern box turtles took a quick look around, split up and headed for the deep woods at high turtle-speed.They were the first of six radio-equipped females released this week in the dark and secluded forest that shelters undeveloped portions of the Baltimore Zoo.The release was part of a yearlong Towson State University study of the threatened species. TSU herpetologist Don C. Forester and four undergraduate volunteers will track the turtles by radio for a year as they establish territories, mate, forage for worms and burrow in for their winter hibernation.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Hugh Panero was driving toward his home near Chevy Chase two years ago when he noticed a strange black device about the size of a small travel iron atop the roof of a car in the next lane. Panero cruised up next to the driver, coaxed him to roll down his window and asked him about the funny-looking gadget. The driver babbled on about how it was an antenna for XM Satellite Radio -- a new service, he said, that beamed 100 channels of music, talk, sports and news from two satellites straight to his car radio with CD-quality sound and reception.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1997
Free at last, two Eastern box turtles took a quick look around, split up and headed for the deep woods at high turtle-speed.They were the first of six radio-equipped females released this week in the dark and secluded forest that shelters undeveloped portions of the Baltimore Zoo.The release was part of a yearlong Towson State University study of the threatened species. TSU herpetologist Don C. Forester and four undergraduate volunteers will track the turtles by radio for a year as they establish territories, mate, forage for worms and burrow in for their winter hibernation.
NEWS
June 16, 1993
POLICE LOG* Hickory Ridge: 6200 block of Sunny Spring: A maroon 1988 Eagle Premiere, which was stolen from Baltimore, was recovered between 7:30 a.m. and 8:10 a.m. Saturday.6000 block of Cedar Wood Drive: Someone broke out the driver's side window of a 1981 Honda Accord between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. Friday, and stole $320 in car radio equipment, including a $160 amplifier.* Town Center: 10300 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: Three Acura Legends were stolen from Columbia Mall's parking lot between 7 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Tom Worgo and Tom Worgo,Contributing writer | June 26, 1991
a Field Day of voices over the airwaves.Twenty-five members of the Columbia Amateur Radio Association tested radio equipment and honed their skills under simulated emergency conditions at the 18th annual Field Day Saturday and Sunday at Clarksville Elementary.Emergencies simulated included floods, hurricanes, nuclear accidents and plane crashes.Field Day has two objectives.The first is to get as many stations as possible on any of about a dozen legal amateur bands to learn to operate under less than optimum conditions.
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