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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2000
No movie is perfect, but when it comes to comedy, apparently "Some Like It Hot" is close enough. The 1959 gender-bending comedy, with Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis as musicians trying to escape the mob by posing as members of an all-girl band, was proclaimed the funniest American film of all time last night. Interestingly, "Some Like It Hot" was one of four films on the list that involved cross-dressing - reinforcing the notion that there's no more sure-fire way to generate laughs than dressing men in women's clothes.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
WJZ, Channel 13, remains atop the Baltimore news heap, capping an impressive run that has seen its news broadcasts winning just about every ratings contest in 1999.For the November sweeps period, which ended Dec. 1, WJZ finished with the top-rated news broadcasts in the early morning -- a dominance morning news hosts Don Scott and Marty Bass have maintained for years, despite the historically poor morning performance of their network, CBS -- as well as at 6 p.m. and 11 p.m.The lone victory for the news at WBAL, Channel 11, came at 5 p.m., when it out-Nielsened WJZ by two-tenths of a rating point, 8.3 vs. 8.1. -- a drop-off from the July ratings book, when WJZ beat WBAL, 8.6 vs. 7.5. Each ratings point represents approximately 10,000 viewing households.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
MPT viewers in the Annapolis area may have some problems with their signal this week.The station is replacing its 25-year-old Crownsville transmission tower and, while work is going on, the signal is being sent out by a temporary transmitter with much less power. Which explains why your picture may not be as clear as you'd like.Officials warn you may not receive any picture at all as the work nears completion.Full power is expected to be restored by Saturday.In other MPT news, the station received a $25,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support production of a documentary on the development of the piano (2000 marks the piano's 300th anniversary)
NEWS
May 30, 2007
James S. McGarity, a former Baltimore radio and TV sales executive who helped bring the Romper Room show to numerous cities, died yesterday of prostate cancer complications at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Mount Washington resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on Madeira Street, he left Patterson Park High School to enlist in the Navy during World War II. He landed on D-Day at Utah Beach after his ship was damaged transporting troops. He swam to shore and temporarily joined an infantry unit.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
Mary Clayburn White, a pioneer of gospel radio who helped transform Baltimore's market into one of the country's largest, died of bone marrow cancer Wednesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. She was 71. With a warm, motherly voice, Mrs. White played spirituals, conducted interviews and served as an advocate for African-Americans on several AM and FM radio stations during a career that spanned three decades. "Back when she first started doing it, there were no 24-hour gospel stations," said Lee Michaels, who worked with her at "Heaven 600" WCAO-AM, one of two round-the-clock gospel stations in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2005
Edward A. Russell Jr., a Television Hill stalwart whose ready smile cheered WBAL colleagues for more than half a century, died of cancer Tuesday at Joseph Richey Hospice -- little more than two weeks after his retirement as reproduction manager for the radio and TV stations. The Lochearn resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Rutland Avenue, he was a 1951 graduate of Dunbar High School and attended Loyola College. Mr. Russell was hired in 1952 as a $35-a-week mail clerk at WBAL, when its studios were at Charles and 26th streets.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Elane Stein, a prominent figure in Baltimore broadcasting whose career in radio and television spanned more than three decades, died Sunday at St. Vincent's Hospital in Santa Fe, N.M., from injuries she suffered in a fall at her home a day earlier. Ms. Stein, who had retired and moved to Santa Fe in 1996, assiduously avoided revealing her age. "She was 85," said her nephew and only survivor, Mark W. Stein of Clarksburg, Montgomery County. "Elane was a major air talent in the 1960s, 1970s and into the 1980s," Richard Sher, a longtime WJZ-TV reporter and friend, recalled yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- In Lebanon, still recovering from 15 years of civil war, a new battle has broken out over the government's plans to tighten control over radio and television stations.Broadcast media owners and operators, supported by a powerful Confederation of Trade Unions, professors and journalism students, have scheduled a nationwide strike Feb. 29. Many fear that the protest could turn violent, because of a government ban on demonstrations.At issue is a government plan to downsize the broadcast industry, which now consists of more than 50 private television ,, and around 150 radio stations.
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