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By SUSAN REIMER | January 3, 2006
Real Simple, the magazine for people whose lives are not, just got a little more complicated. It is becoming a television show. It has already become a couple books: Real Simple: The Organized Home and Real Simple Solutions. And it is also a syndicated newspaper column and a feature on Take Five, the new women's channel on XM Satellite Radio. Beginning this weekend on PBS, the magazine that has been a publishing phenomenon since its launch five years ago will try to translate that success into television, too (1:30 p.m. Saturday on MPT; 7:30 a.m. Sunday on WETA)
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BUSINESS
By Robert Channick and The Chicago Tribune | July 10, 2013
One week after boosting its broadcasting holdings with the announcement of a deal to purchase 19 television stations,  Tribune Co. said Wednesday morning it intends to spin off its publishing business into a separate company.   The move would separate Tribune Co.'s publishing assets, including the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, The Baltimore Sun and five other daily newspapers, from the Chicago-based media company's more profitable broadcasting holdings,...
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FEATURES
January 25, 2008
Jan. 25 1947 American gangster Al Capone died in Miami Beach, Fla., at age 48. 1961 President John F. Kennedy held the first presidential news conference carried live on radio and television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
The Baltimore Ravens and Hearst Broadcasting announced a new deal Sunday night that will keep the team on WBAL radio and television for the next five years. Given the incredibly strong media performanance of all things Ravens locally and nationally, this is big news for WBAL -- news that is sure to keep the Hearst-owned radio, TV and online properties at or near the top of Baltimore sports media. Here's the announcement: Hearst Broadcasting and the Baltimore Ravens signed a new five year extension of their partnership today.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1999
Talk about landing on your feet. Just last week, Barry Baker issued a surprise resignation from Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. of Baltimore, where he headed day-to-day radio and television operations. At the time, Baker, 46, said only that he wanted to pursue new business opportunities.Yesterday, USA Networks Inc., the aggressive television and electronic-commerce company headed by broadcast mogul Barry Diller, announced that it has named Baker as its new president and chief operating officer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 26, 2008
Look for veteran radio and television newsman Tom Lattanzi to be in the crowd at this morning's Waverly Farmers' Market, where he's a fruit and vegetable shopper with his wife of 33 years, Karen. These days Lattanzi represents Screenvision Direct, a business that places 30-second ad spots on the screens of movie theaters before a feature film begins. "We love attending the festivals in the city and visiting neighborhoods such as Hampden, where our daughter, Chiari, won the Miss Hon contest in 2000," he said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
Shares of Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. fell 19.4 percent yesterday, reacting to the company's announcement late Tuesday of unexpected financial losses and the resignation of a key executive.The company's stock closed at $13.50, a decline of $3.25 a share.The Baltimore company owns or programs a rapidly expanding national chain of radio and television stations. Locally, the company owns Fox television affiliate WBFF (Channel 45) and programs the WB Network affiliate, WNUV (Channel 54).David B. Amy, Sinclair's chief financial officer, said the company is close to selling some of its radio and television stations to focus on key markets after a flurry of acquisitions.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 25, 2007
Baby boomers loved Lary Lewman as Pete the Pirate, who captured the Baltimore TV market from 4:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on WBAL-TV from 1960 to 1964. His archenemy was Captain Awfulmean. On Sunday, he put on a clay putty nose and became Captain Fog. Lewman, now 70 and retired, lives in a Clarksville home with his wife, Nancy, with whom he appeared on a 1959 show, What's New with the Lewmans. After his days as Pete, he made an artful transition to become The Voice. By 1980 he became what voters heard on radio and television - but never saw - in Jimmy Carter's re-election campaign.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
William J. Weisz, 70, a former chairman and chief executive of Motorola Inc. who played a leading role in the electronics company's rapid growth during the 1970s and 1980s, died of an apparent heart attack Dec. 17 at his home outside Phoenix.Sey Chassler, 78, who expanded women's magazines beyond printing recipes to promoting equal rights as the editor in chief of Redbook, died of complications of cancer Dec. 11 at New York University Medical Center.Roger Barkley, 61, a radio and television personality who joined Al Lohman to entertain Southern California radio audiences for 25 years, died of cancer Sunday in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
You can barely turn on the television or radio without running into some kind of holiday programming. This isn't new. From Bing Crosby's 1930s holiday radio broadcasts to the present day's A Clay Aiken Christmas TV special, radio and TV programming this time of the year is often all about the holidays. On Saturday, visitors to the Radio and Television Museum in Bowie can celebrate the history of Christmas radio and TV programming at "Santa's Big Broadcast." Vintage radio and television shows from the '40s, '50s, '60s and '70s will be featured, some geared to children, some to adults.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
Dorothy E. Brunson, who became the first African-American woman in the nation to own a radio station when she bought WEBB-AM in Baltimore, died Sunday of complications from ovarian cancer at Mercy Medical Center. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 72. "Thanks to the pioneering work of Ms. Brunson, the world of broadcast media was opened up to African-American entrepreneurs and business leaders," Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. "Her vision and commitment to excellence at every level of the business led to her success and paved the way for others to find success in cities across America.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
Gerald J. Stautberg, a longtime auto dealer whose TV advertisements - "For the best deal anywhere, you just gotta come to Jerry's" - wooed generations of car buyers to his Parkville dealership, died Sunday of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Monkton resident was 79. "Jerry was one of the first dealers to use radio and TV advertising in this market. He was a real pioneer," said John Sophocles, former general manager of Jerry's Chevrolet, who is now president of TASCO, a telemessaging company that Mr. Stautberg has owned since 1988.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Elane Stein, a prominent figure in Baltimore broadcasting whose career in radio and television spanned more than three decades, died Sunday at St. Vincent's Hospital in Santa Fe, N.M., from injuries she suffered in a fall at her home a day earlier. Ms. Stein, who had retired and moved to Santa Fe in 1996, assiduously avoided revealing her age. "She was 85," said her nephew and only survivor, Mark W. Stein of Clarksburg, Montgomery County. "Elane was a major air talent in the 1960s, 1970s and into the 1980s," Richard Sher, a longtime WJZ-TV reporter and friend, recalled yesterday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 26, 2008
Look for veteran radio and television newsman Tom Lattanzi to be in the crowd at this morning's Waverly Farmers' Market, where he's a fruit and vegetable shopper with his wife of 33 years, Karen. These days Lattanzi represents Screenvision Direct, a business that places 30-second ad spots on the screens of movie theaters before a feature film begins. "We love attending the festivals in the city and visiting neighborhoods such as Hampden, where our daughter, Chiari, won the Miss Hon contest in 2000," he said.
FEATURES
January 25, 2008
Jan. 25 1947 American gangster Al Capone died in Miami Beach, Fla., at age 48. 1961 President John F. Kennedy held the first presidential news conference carried live on radio and television.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
In a race that has split moderate and conservative Republicans, 1st District congressional opponents Wayne T. Gilchrest and David Fischer - along with their supporters in rival GOP organizations - are spending unprecedented amounts for radio and television ads in a last-minute push before Tuesday's primary election. Gilchrest, a six-term incumbent who has not faced serious opposition in a decade, is setting what his staff calls a "high water" mark for fund-raising in the district . Much of that money - $275,000 according to the most recent campaign finance reports - has gone for radio and television spots featuring endorsements from President Bush and Maryland gubernatorial candidate Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. One 30-second spot on television stations in Baltimore and Salisbury quotes a letter of endorsement from Bush, then includes a voice-over by Ehrlich, who calls Gilchrest a "thoughtful, reasoned voice on key conservative issues."
NEWS
December 18, 2001
John Guedel, 88, who produced three of radio and television's most enduring programs - Art Linkletter's People Are Funny and House Party, and Groucho Marx's You Bet Your Life - died of heart failure Saturday at a hospital in West Hollywood, Calif. Mr. Guedel was originator of what might have been the first radio stunt game show with People are Funny, which moved from radio to television in 1954, and the first singing commercial on radio. Mr. Guedel created You Bet Your Life for Mr. Marx in 1947, including having a duck drop down and deliver a $100 bill whenever a contestant uttered the "secret word."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 25, 2007
Baby boomers loved Lary Lewman as Pete the Pirate, who captured the Baltimore TV market from 4:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on WBAL-TV from 1960 to 1964. His archenemy was Captain Awfulmean. On Sunday, he put on a clay putty nose and became Captain Fog. Lewman, now 70 and retired, lives in a Clarksville home with his wife, Nancy, with whom he appeared on a 1959 show, What's New with the Lewmans. After his days as Pete, he made an artful transition to become The Voice. By 1980 he became what voters heard on radio and television - but never saw - in Jimmy Carter's re-election campaign.
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