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Radicchio

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By Faith Willinger and Faith Willinger,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1993
It's easy to spot in salads at trendy restaurants. It's newe than sun-dried tomatoes, hipper than arugula -- purplish-red shreds or cupped white-veined leaves of yet another easily mispronounced Italian designer lettuce. But once you've learned say rah-DEE-key-oh, you're ready to start cooking, because red radicchio is easy to cook -- at its best grilled, braised, roasted or stir-fried, in risotto or saucing pasta. Bitter but not nasty, it is food only grown-ups can love. Besides, it's low in calories.
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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2008
If your winter salads need a wake-up call, radicchio, a member of the chicory family, may be the right leaf to join the plate. Its red and white colors add visual interest; its slightly bitter taste, another flavor note for a good dressing to play with. Radicchio originated as a wild chicory in Italy, writes Aliza Green in Starting With Ingredients. Modern radicchio was developed in the 1860s. Two varieties of radicchio are commonly found in the United States -- radicchio rosso di Chioggia, shaped like a head of cabbage with dark leaves, and radicchio rosso di Treviso (also known simply as Treviso)
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FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Contributing Writer | January 23, 1994
One of my favorite meals during this season is a beef entree and a glass of a good red wine. Nothing leaves me as well satisfied as a simple piece of broiled beef and a California red.Among the choices for broiling, I prefer flank steak to the classic T-bone or sirloin. It's easy to cook, doesn't have a lot of fat to trim or wasted bone, and takes the flavor of a marinade very well.In the recipe below, flank steak is marinated in a mixture of garlic, soy sauce, honey and red wine that brings out the meat's sweet-smoky taste.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2007
I love the bitter taste of radicchio in salads, but some people do not. Cooking this colorful member of the chicory family tames its flavor without obliterating it. In this pasta dish, the rich sweetness of the blue cheese further tempers the radicchio. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Fusilli With Radicchio, Chicken Sausage and Blue Cheese Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 8 ounces fusilli or other shaped pasta 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 chicken sausages (about 3/4 pound)
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 6, 1999
Recently I attended the annual meeting of the International Association of Culinary Professionals, a group of cooking teachers, food writers, chefs and others involved in the world of food. This year the meeting was held in Phoenix, and I, like others, couldn't wait to try some of the town's well-known restaurants. Although I dined in several of the myriad Southwestern establishments there, it was a small Italian spot that I liked most.At Pizzeria Bianco, in downtown Phoenix, I watched the chef work in front of a wood-fired oven and pull out paper-thin pizzas with all manner of inventive toppings.
FEATURES
By Sibella Kraus and Sibella Kraus,Contributing Writer | August 22, 1993
The rediscovery of greens is one of the great pleasures of today's kitchen. We are realizing what other cultures have known for centuries -- how flavorful, healthful and economical all the various greens can be.In the past decade, the selection of greens in farmers' markets, ++ specialty stores and supermarkets has increased dramatically. Up until a few years ago, we had to go to France or Italy to enjoy specialty lettuces, greens such as arugula, and salad mixes such as mesclun. If we wanted ethnic greens such as bok-choy or broccoli di rape, we had to seek them out at specialty markets.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 8, 1991
Pieces of column too short to use:Vice President Dan Quayle will be throwing out the first ball at Memorial Stadium today. To which I can only say, "Heads up!"*"This is the biggest thing since beer came back," a barroom mug named Bernie told The Evening Sun the day Memorial Stadium opened and the Orioles came to town. That was April 15, 1954, the day of the big parade and a 3-1 home team victory over the White Sox. Some 350,000 Baltimoreans lined the streets. Restaurants and bars were jammed, and the busiest departments in department stores were the ones with TV sets.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 25, 2006
Some leftover radicchio and a few extra popovers inspired this dish. In our house, homemade popovers are a treat, and we wouldn't want to waste one of them. We split them open and top them with chicken and radicchio, enriched with flavored butter and a bit of cream. Not popover proficient? You can re-create this dish easily at home with slices of good, rustic Italian bread, biscuits or even dinner rolls. We used a tomato and chipotle-flavored butter from Epicurean Butter, but you can make your own flavored butter by mixing 1/2 teaspoon of a fresh herb (or adobo sauce, as we do here)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | January 30, 2008
If your winter salads need a wake-up call, radicchio, a member of the chicory family, may be the right leaf to join the plate. Its red and white colors add visual interest; its slightly bitter taste, another flavor note for a good dressing to play with. Radicchio originated as a wild chicory in Italy, writes Aliza Green in Starting With Ingredients. Modern radicchio was developed in the 1860s. Two varieties of radicchio are commonly found in the United States -- radicchio rosso di Chioggia, shaped like a head of cabbage with dark leaves, and radicchio rosso di Treviso (also known simply as Treviso)
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2007
I love the bitter taste of radicchio in salads, but some people do not. Cooking this colorful member of the chicory family tames its flavor without obliterating it. In this pasta dish, the rich sweetness of the blue cheese further tempers the radicchio. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Fusilli With Radicchio, Chicken Sausage and Blue Cheese Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 8 ounces fusilli or other shaped pasta 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 chicken sausages (about 3/4 pound)
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 25, 2006
Some leftover radicchio and a few extra popovers inspired this dish. In our house, homemade popovers are a treat, and we wouldn't want to waste one of them. We split them open and top them with chicken and radicchio, enriched with flavored butter and a bit of cream. Not popover proficient? You can re-create this dish easily at home with slices of good, rustic Italian bread, biscuits or even dinner rolls. We used a tomato and chipotle-flavored butter from Epicurean Butter, but you can make your own flavored butter by mixing 1/2 teaspoon of a fresh herb (or adobo sauce, as we do here)
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 6, 1999
Recently I attended the annual meeting of the International Association of Culinary Professionals, a group of cooking teachers, food writers, chefs and others involved in the world of food. This year the meeting was held in Phoenix, and I, like others, couldn't wait to try some of the town's well-known restaurants. Although I dined in several of the myriad Southwestern establishments there, it was a small Italian spot that I liked most.At Pizzeria Bianco, in downtown Phoenix, I watched the chef work in front of a wood-fired oven and pull out paper-thin pizzas with all manner of inventive toppings.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Contributing Writer | January 23, 1994
One of my favorite meals during this season is a beef entree and a glass of a good red wine. Nothing leaves me as well satisfied as a simple piece of broiled beef and a California red.Among the choices for broiling, I prefer flank steak to the classic T-bone or sirloin. It's easy to cook, doesn't have a lot of fat to trim or wasted bone, and takes the flavor of a marinade very well.In the recipe below, flank steak is marinated in a mixture of garlic, soy sauce, honey and red wine that brings out the meat's sweet-smoky taste.
FEATURES
By Sibella Kraus and Sibella Kraus,Contributing Writer | August 22, 1993
The rediscovery of greens is one of the great pleasures of today's kitchen. We are realizing what other cultures have known for centuries -- how flavorful, healthful and economical all the various greens can be.In the past decade, the selection of greens in farmers' markets, ++ specialty stores and supermarkets has increased dramatically. Up until a few years ago, we had to go to France or Italy to enjoy specialty lettuces, greens such as arugula, and salad mixes such as mesclun. If we wanted ethnic greens such as bok-choy or broccoli di rape, we had to seek them out at specialty markets.
FEATURES
By Faith Willinger and Faith Willinger,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1993
It's easy to spot in salads at trendy restaurants. It's newe than sun-dried tomatoes, hipper than arugula -- purplish-red shreds or cupped white-veined leaves of yet another easily mispronounced Italian designer lettuce. But once you've learned say rah-DEE-key-oh, you're ready to start cooking, because red radicchio is easy to cook -- at its best grilled, braised, roasted or stir-fried, in risotto or saucing pasta. Bitter but not nasty, it is food only grown-ups can love. Besides, it's low in calories.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 8, 1991
Pieces of column too short to use:Vice President Dan Quayle will be throwing out the first ball at Memorial Stadium today. To which I can only say, "Heads up!"*"This is the biggest thing since beer came back," a barroom mug named Bernie told The Evening Sun the day Memorial Stadium opened and the Orioles came to town. That was April 15, 1954, the day of the big parade and a 3-1 home team victory over the White Sox. Some 350,000 Baltimoreans lined the streets. Restaurants and bars were jammed, and the busiest departments in department stores were the ones with TV sets.
FEATURES
By Mollie Katzen and Mollie Katzen,Tribune Media Services | October 20, 2007
The more colorful the foliage and the nippier the air, the heartier-yet-simpler our suppers can be. Here's a great recipe for expressing that autumn spirit - a rich, earthy risotto laced with the pleasantly bitter edge of radicchio, deepened by the mysterious flavor of porcini mushrooms, bound together in a lush, soothing backdrop of the traditional creamy rice. The charm of any risotto is the contrast between the separate, al dente grains and the thick, smooth sauce in which they are suspended.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing WriterUniversal Press Syndicate | July 22, 1992
When it comes to dining alfresco, many folks would just as soon eat outdoors.Me? I'm not in favor of sharing any well-prepared meal with the summer swarms of God's little flying creatures, especially those which take fiendish delight in camping out on the very morsel I'm about to devour.Many do enjoy eating outside -- alfresco, as it were. Consequently each summer a number of new cookbooks aimed in that direction are published.At the head of the picnic table this year is an oversized, pricey volume titled (surprise!
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