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NEWS
By Arthur Schlesinger Jr | December 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- What's it all about, this brawl in Washington? Some think it is about punishing an adulterous and mendacious president. Others think it is about protecting the democratic process against a vengeful attempt to undo a presidential election. Perhaps a historical perspective may have its uses -- not that historians are wiser than anybody else (they aren't), but they are more professionally inclined to look at the long-term impact on our constitutional order.The Framers reserved impeachment for officials charged with "Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."
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NEWS
February 14, 2012
Your article, "New budget to renew battles" (Feb. 12) points out the stark and perhaps unprecedented separation between our two major political parties. Democrats continue to display timidity and confusion and are often too ready to compromise, but they have generally proposed balanced approaches to solving the nation's ills. Republicans on the other hand have taken several extreme and dangerous positions. All current candidates have pledged to reverse Roe v. Wade and to forcibly evict some 12 million undocumented workers and their families.
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NEWS
By Everatt Carll Ladd | February 21, 1995
NEWSPAPERS are now publishing scorecards that summarize the progress through Congress of the Republicans' "Contract With America." The scope and pace of legislative activity is extraordinary.What are the historical parallels? The only other periods when Congress enacted such sweeping changes in so short a span of time were 1933 and 1965.The 1933 period came via a special session of Congress that responded to the Great Depression. In the famous "Hundred Days" from March 9 to June 15, the 73rd Congress enacted major banking legislation, farm subsidies, the Tennessee Valley Authority and a host of public works and relief programs.
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2001
LANCASTER, Pa. -- Once again, Thaddeus Stevens is a catalyst for debate in his old hometown. The last time this happened, the "Old Commoner" was the fierce leader of the Radical Republicans during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The driving force in Congress behind the constitutional amendments that abolished slavery and extended equal protection of the law, he was a foe of slavery, a champion of civil rights for African-Americans, a goad to Abraham Lincoln, a scourge of the South.
NEWS
By Linda R. Hirshman | July 19, 1994
THE POLITICAL fallout from the resurgence of the radical right is starting. But nothing will hurt Republicans more than the conservatives' gender war against the female members of their own party. Senate candidate Oliver North, for one, raises money with a letter contending that the political process has been "captured by an arrogant army of radical feminists."For some time, the Republican Party has been casting parts of the American public -- blacks, Jews -- overboard. But gender war is their riskiest strategy to date.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | December 11, 1998
IN 1868, President Andrew Johnson was impeached in one of the most outrageous legislative acts in history. Johnson was a grossly unpopular president: a Southern politician who succeeded an assassinated president after the Civil War. Johnson protected his native South from harsh retribution by the so-called Radical Republicans and was widely reviled by the public as pro-Southern. Radical Republicans called for his removal and used his unpopularity to distract the House from its constitutional obligations.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | August 10, 1995
Chicago -- WHEN THE HOUSE of Representatives recently recessed after passing major spending bills, Speaker Newt Gingrich said it had demonstrated the new Republican priorities. There were, he said, "substantial underlying changes going on at a philosophical level of how you try to do things in this country."The speaker was exactly right. The shaping of the appropriation bills made clearer than ever where the radical Republicans want to take America.They cut Head Start by $137 million. They added $7 billion to the defense budget that the armed services had not requested.
NEWS
By Marianne Means | November 14, 1994
Washington -- OOPS. THE ROOF fell in last week. What should President Clinton and his party do now?The president contends that the atmospherics got him: The voters didn't like all the partisan squabbling and legislative constipation they saw in Washington. They wanted change when they elected him, and he hadn't provided enough of it.The Republicans insist it was the agenda that did it: They were specific about their ideological goals, although not about how to pay for everything without increasing the budget deficit.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | July 14, 1991
Records and legends of the days from 1861 to 1865 abound and keep turning up. A recent find was the 1864 diary of Lawrence Pike Graham, an obscure but literate regular Army man. A native Virginian, Graham spent some time in Maryland during the Civil War. He was an able soldier but lacked the inner-circle leverage that a West Point diploma would have given him. After 20 years' service, he finally made major.The Civil War brought Graham a brigade command, but sickness sidelined him in 1862.
NEWS
February 14, 2012
Your article, "New budget to renew battles" (Feb. 12) points out the stark and perhaps unprecedented separation between our two major political parties. Democrats continue to display timidity and confusion and are often too ready to compromise, but they have generally proposed balanced approaches to solving the nation's ills. Republicans on the other hand have taken several extreme and dangerous positions. All current candidates have pledged to reverse Roe v. Wade and to forcibly evict some 12 million undocumented workers and their families.
NEWS
By Arthur Schlesinger Jr | December 18, 1998
NEW YORK -- What's it all about, this brawl in Washington? Some think it is about punishing an adulterous and mendacious president. Others think it is about protecting the democratic process against a vengeful attempt to undo a presidential election. Perhaps a historical perspective may have its uses -- not that historians are wiser than anybody else (they aren't), but they are more professionally inclined to look at the long-term impact on our constitutional order.The Framers reserved impeachment for officials charged with "Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | December 11, 1998
IN 1868, President Andrew Johnson was impeached in one of the most outrageous legislative acts in history. Johnson was a grossly unpopular president: a Southern politician who succeeded an assassinated president after the Civil War. Johnson protected his native South from harsh retribution by the so-called Radical Republicans and was widely reviled by the public as pro-Southern. Radical Republicans called for his removal and used his unpopularity to distract the House from its constitutional obligations.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | August 10, 1995
Chicago -- WHEN THE HOUSE of Representatives recently recessed after passing major spending bills, Speaker Newt Gingrich said it had demonstrated the new Republican priorities. There were, he said, "substantial underlying changes going on at a philosophical level of how you try to do things in this country."The speaker was exactly right. The shaping of the appropriation bills made clearer than ever where the radical Republicans want to take America.They cut Head Start by $137 million. They added $7 billion to the defense budget that the armed services had not requested.
NEWS
By Everatt Carll Ladd | February 21, 1995
NEWSPAPERS are now publishing scorecards that summarize the progress through Congress of the Republicans' "Contract With America." The scope and pace of legislative activity is extraordinary.What are the historical parallels? The only other periods when Congress enacted such sweeping changes in so short a span of time were 1933 and 1965.The 1933 period came via a special session of Congress that responded to the Great Depression. In the famous "Hundred Days" from March 9 to June 15, the 73rd Congress enacted major banking legislation, farm subsidies, the Tennessee Valley Authority and a host of public works and relief programs.
NEWS
By Marianne Means | November 14, 1994
Washington -- OOPS. THE ROOF fell in last week. What should President Clinton and his party do now?The president contends that the atmospherics got him: The voters didn't like all the partisan squabbling and legislative constipation they saw in Washington. They wanted change when they elected him, and he hadn't provided enough of it.The Republicans insist it was the agenda that did it: They were specific about their ideological goals, although not about how to pay for everything without increasing the budget deficit.
NEWS
By Linda R. Hirshman | July 19, 1994
THE POLITICAL fallout from the resurgence of the radical right is starting. But nothing will hurt Republicans more than the conservatives' gender war against the female members of their own party. Senate candidate Oliver North, for one, raises money with a letter contending that the political process has been "captured by an arrogant army of radical feminists."For some time, the Republican Party has been casting parts of the American public -- blacks, Jews -- overboard. But gender war is their riskiest strategy to date.
NEWS
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2001
LANCASTER, Pa. -- Once again, Thaddeus Stevens is a catalyst for debate in his old hometown. The last time this happened, the "Old Commoner" was the fierce leader of the Radical Republicans during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The driving force in Congress behind the constitutional amendments that abolished slavery and extended equal protection of the law, he was a foe of slavery, a champion of civil rights for African-Americans, a goad to Abraham Lincoln, a scourge of the South.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | October 8, 2013
Editor: This Federal government shutdown is the latest antic by the Tea Party Republicans to achieve by sheer force what they did not achieve in the most recent national elections and cannot achieve by attempting to extort concessions not only from the President of these United States, but the American families and economy as well.  As a long time resident of Harford County and a Federal retiree, who spent 37 proud years working for the U.S....
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | July 14, 1991
Records and legends of the days from 1861 to 1865 abound and keep turning up. A recent find was the 1864 diary of Lawrence Pike Graham, an obscure but literate regular Army man. A native Virginian, Graham spent some time in Maryland during the Civil War. He was an able soldier but lacked the inner-circle leverage that a West Point diploma would have given him. After 20 years' service, he finally made major.The Civil War brought Graham a brigade command, but sickness sidelined him in 1862.
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