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NEWS
February 2, 1993
Harbor Hospital Center has added on-site radiation therapy to its cancer center to serve inpatients and cancer outpatients who live in the community.The Harbor Hospital Cancer Center has teamed up with the University of Maryland Medical Center's Radiation Oncology Associates, offering the service in the hospital's Gruehn Building.Cancer center patients no longer will need to transfer to other hospitals in Baltimore for radiation therapy. The new service also will give cancer patients who live in Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn easier access to treatment, hospital officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Towson University President Maravene Loeschke told faculty and staff Friday that she was recently diagnosed with cancer but expects to make a full recovery. Loeschke said the cancer, which is in her adrenal gland, was discovered at an early stage during a routine exam. She said she had surgery a few weeks ago and will undergo six weeks of radiation therapy to ensure the cancer does not spread. "I feel great and have no symptoms of any kind," Loeschke wrote in an email to faculty and staff members.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
Signaling increased consolidation in the specialty medical business, New Jersey-based Transworld Home HealthCare Inc. announced yesterday that it has signed a letter of intent to acquire 80 percent of the privately held RADAMERICA Inc., the single largest provider of radiation oncology therapy in Maryland.Terms of the cash transaction were not disclosed.Transworld, a $16 million home health firm catering to cancer patients, said the acquisition gives it the expertise to add radiation therapy centers to the services it now offers patients in New York, New Jersey and Florida.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
SALARY: $75,000 AGE: 34 YEARS ON THE JOB: 1 1/2 How he got started: : Having always enjoyed science and math, Jason Judy knew he wanted to go into the medical field. He graduated from the Essex campus of the Community College of Baltimore County with an associate's degree in respiratory therapy. He worked in that field for five years but decided to go back to get his associate's degree in radiation therapy. He worked for four years as a radiation therapist with the last three years at GBMC.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
A GenVec Inc. drug designed to enhance the effects of radiation therapy in cancer patients showed promise in an early-stage clinical trial, according to results presented yesterday at a scientific conference in San Francisco. Tumors injected before radiation with the gene-therapy drug TNFerade shrank in all seven patients in the trial, with tumors treated in two patients disappearing entirely, the company said. Meanwhile, "control" tumors did not shrink when treated with the same doses of radiation alone in some of the same patients.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
Dr. Jeffery A. Williams, associate professor of neurosurgery and oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who devised a method of treating brain tumors with radiation that spared surrounding tissue, died Saturday of a heart attack while exercising at the hospital's fitness center. He was 50. The Canton resident was one of the world's foremost radiosurgeons and director of stereotactic radiosurgery, a division of the department of neurosurgery at Hopkins that treats tumors with focused radiation.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | October 20, 1992
For the first time, major health organizations have agreed upon standards clarifying which breast cancer patients should be offered the option of lumpectomy and radiation therapy as an alternative to removal of the breast, the American College of Radiology announced today.At least one-third of all breast cancer patients could be eligible for a lumpectomy -- removal of the primary breast tumor and adjacent breast tissue -- followed by about six weeks of radiation therapy instead of mastectomy, under the new guidelines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2004
An estimated 30,000 men who have had prostate cancer surgery will relapse this year, and half of them will die. But many of those patients can be saved, a new study says, if doctors treat them with radiation therapy at the earliest signs of recurrence. In cases where prostate cancer appears to be returning after surgery, doctors usually forgo using local radiation treatment altogether because they assume the disease has spread. Hormones, which are helpful but cannot cure the disease, are typically given instead.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
As a radiation oncologist here in Bel Air, I wanted to share an issue that could affect the cancer treatment of a great many of our friends and neighbors. Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed a change to the way free standing radiation oncology practices are reimbursed for their services. The end result is a $300 million cut to cancer care, which will have unfortunate consequences for patients who require radiation treatment. Most patients with cancer require radiation treatments in the course of their care.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent advisory panel, recently recommended that healthy men not be given PSA blood tests to detect prostate cancer. But that won't mean the end of diagnosis and treatment of the disease, the most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death in American men. Dr. E. James Wright, associate professor and director of the Division of Reconstructive and Neurological Urology and chief of urology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, answers questions about diagnosis and the latest treatments, including measures to mitigate side effects such as incontinence and impotence.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
A story in a motorcycle trade paper started Bob Henig on his 20-year crusade to help children overcome a deadly disease that attacks 11 of them in the U.S. daily. The children's stories of coping, surviving and sometimes succumbing have kept him riding to raise money to battle pediatric brain cancer. He will be on the road Sunday, leading a charity drive of about 400 motorcyclists that will likely surpass the $3 million milestone in local funds raised for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation.
NEWS
May 21, 2011
I object in the strongest terms to the unfounded allegations in Jay Hancock 's column "Self-referral rules or not, business as usual for clinic" (May 17). The column is a one-sided, uninformed attack on the integrity of those who practice and work at Chesapeake Urology Associates. At Chesapeake Urology, treatment decisions are made by our patients and their families only after all available options are presented and discussed. We only do what is best for our patients. To suggest otherwise, as Mr. Hancock does, is insulting to us and to our profession.
HEALTH
By Jay Hancock | May 17, 2011
There is little question that Maryland legislators intended to "substantially restrict" the ability of urologists and other prescribing doctors to refer patients to their own radiation centers, the state Court of Appeals wrote a few months ago. Why? Study after study shows that when doctors profit from expensive radiology procedures, they order too many of them. Medicos who refer cancer patients to self-owned radiation centers "increase the use of services and costs substantially" and don't improve care, according to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in the 1990s.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
The University of Maryland's growing BioPark in West Baltimore will get a $200 million boost from plans announced Wednesday by the School of Medicine to team with private partners on a state-of-the-art proton cancer treatment center. Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown said the center would create 325 construction jobs, 110 permanent jobs and attract 2,000 patients a year. "It will also continue the state's and Baltimore City's investment in the communities of West Baltimore," he said.
NEWS
January 29, 1993
Harbor adds radiation to cancer careHarbor Hospital Center has added on-site radiation therapy to its cancer center to serve inpatients and cancer outpatients who live in the community.The Harbor Hospital Cancer Center has teamed up with the University of Maryland Medical Center's Radiation Oncology Associates, offering the service in the hospital's Gruehn Building.Cancer center patients no longer will need to transfer to other hospitals in Baltimore for radiation therapy. The new service also will give cancer patients who live in Brooklyn Park and Brooklyn easier access to treatment, hospital officials said.
NEWS
May 21, 2011
I object in the strongest terms to the unfounded allegations in Jay Hancock 's column "Self-referral rules or not, business as usual for clinic" (May 17). The column is a one-sided, uninformed attack on the integrity of those who practice and work at Chesapeake Urology Associates. At Chesapeake Urology, treatment decisions are made by our patients and their families only after all available options are presented and discussed. We only do what is best for our patients. To suggest otherwise, as Mr. Hancock does, is insulting to us and to our profession.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
SALARY: $75,000 AGE: 34 YEARS ON THE JOB: 1 1/2 How he got started: : Having always enjoyed science and math, Jason Judy knew he wanted to go into the medical field. He graduated from the Essex campus of the Community College of Baltimore County with an associate's degree in respiratory therapy. He worked in that field for five years but decided to go back to get his associate's degree in radiation therapy. He worked for four years as a radiation therapist with the last three years at GBMC.
NEWS
By Josh Goldstein and Josh Goldstein,McClatchy-Tribune | December 15, 2006
For years, doctors have urged older men with early-stage, low-risk prostate cancer to "watch and wait" -- skip treatment until tests showed the cancer was growing aggressively. Now, a study suggests there's a significant benefit from treating men older than 65 surgically or with radiation therapy. "We found that men who had either a radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy within six months of their prostate cancer diagnosis were 30 percent less likely to die than those who did not undergo treatment," said Yu-Ning Wong, a medical oncologist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and lead author of the study.
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