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By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 20, 2010
The Maryland Department of the Environment announced Friday that it fined the Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Hospital $370,000 - the largest such penalty ever paid by Hopkins - after finding problems related to how the university and hospital handled radiation materials, maintained radiation machines and administered radiation to one patient. The bulk of the 19 alleged violations, found between May 2007 and September 2009, deal with security issues, not public health, said Dawn Stoltzfus, a spokeswoman for the Department of the Environment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Everyone working in the state health department's sixth-floor radiation lab in Baltimore knew it was only a matter of time before fallout from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants in Japan finally reached Maryland. But on March 23, when the signature of radioactive iodine 131 turned up in an air filter tested in one of the state health lab's gamma-ray counters, Abudureheman Abulimiti, a senior scientist in the lab, wasn't ready to believe it. Although the radiation lab has been monitoring the state's air and water for decades, this was the first time its current employees — too new to recall the Chernobyl meltdown in 1986 — had seen a radioactive byproduct from a reactor accident.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Two solar flares that occurred this week are speeding toward Earth, possibly causing minor disruptions for radio technology and power grids, and also making the aurora borealis appear much farther south than normal. Neither flare was particularly powerful, but it's unusual that two moderate events would occur in such quick succession, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials said Thursday. They could combine to make for a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm on Earth.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
Skyrocketing numbers of expensive medical imaging procedures - from CT scans to nuclear stress tests - are not just straining the nation's health care system, but are exposing patients to significant amounts of potentially cancer-causing radiation even though little research has been done into whether those tests actually make people healthier, a new study suggests. The tests, say the study's authors, may be doing more harm than good. "One reason why these tests are being used more is they're getting better and better and they're an extremely helpful part of diagnosis and treatment," said Dr. Reza Fazel, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and the lead author of a study in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 23, 1994
Radiation is a doubled-edged sword: It can be our deadly enemy, as when it leaks out of a nuclear reactor and harms innocent people; yet it can also be our friend, as when it leaks out of a nuclear reactor and harms Donald Trump.Another example: Dentists use radiation, in the form of X-rays, to determine which of our teeth are still real, so they can grind them into stumps and cover them with improved space-age materials costing thousands of dollars per ounce. Yet those very same X-rays, if we are overexposed to them, can cause us to look like Willie Nelson.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Two solar flares that occurred this week are speeding toward Earth, possibly causing minor disruptions for radio technology and power grids, and also making the aurora borealis appear much farther south than normal. Neither flare was particularly powerful, but it's unusual that two moderate events would occur in such quick succession, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials said Thursday. They could combine to make for a moderate to strong geomagnetic storm on Earth.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Maryland officials say they've detected little or no trace of radiation in the state from the Japanese nuclear reactor accident, though federal agencies are reporting slightly elevated levels of radioactive iodine in rainwater in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts. Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Maryland secretary of health and mental hygiene, said that monitoring by state agencies of air, water and food supplies has found "no reason for public health concern. " The Environmental Protection Agency and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Sunday that "very small amounts" of radioactive materials might be detected in air and precipitation across the country using very sensitive equipment.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department disclosed yesterday that over a 45-year period the United States conducted 204 previously unreported underground nuclear tests and deliberately exposed at least 18 Americans to dangerous levels of nuclear material.Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary said she planned to release more information in June about experiments conducted on 18 people in the 1940s to assess effects of plutonium radiation.Those tests were among an estimated 800 radiation experiments conducted on more than 600 individuals over the years.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
County officials were caught by surprise last week when they learned of radioactive contamination on the 85-acre tract of land where County Executive Robert R. Neall had hoped to build a new Detention Center.After all, they received assurances from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission when they bought the property on New Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie 12 years ago that it met all standards. And it did, according to an NRC survey done at that time.But back in 1977, when the NRC performed the survey and cleared the land for sale, there were no guidelines for radiation in the soil.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
When Ben Benokraitis bought a solar-powered water heater for his Baltimore County home two years ago, the installation company told him he'd get about $800 a year in payments to help offset the cost. That money would come from the sale of three Solar Renewable Energy Credits, or SRECs, his small system would create each year. His solar installer would broker the sales and send him a check. But instead of the $1,600 he expected in the past two years, Greenspring Energy passed along $225.25 — payment for a single credit — before laying off its workers and locking the doors to its home office in Timonium at the end of January.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2014
Bye bye, blimp. Hello, helicopter. For the second time in recent months, Baltimore residents will see an unfamiliar aircraft flying above the city as part of surveying work by the federal government. Last time it was a blimp. This time a helicopter will be flying a lot closer, a lot louder and a lot faster. On Wednesday and Thursday, a helicopter performing an aerial survey of "naturally occurring background radiation" will repeatedly fly over Baltimore at low altitudes and at a speed of about 80 mph, according to the National Nuclear Security Administration.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Howard E. Chaney, a retired Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene official whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 95. Howard Edward Chaney was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated from the Polytechnic Institute in 1935. He then took a job as a laboratory assistant with the state Department of Health - now the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - in the Division of Chemistry, where his job was washing glassware and test tubes.
NEWS
March 27, 2013
Several articles about utility smart meters, most recently the profile of a retired EPA attorney who has concerns about them ("At the center of smart-meter fight," March 24), indicate that those opposed to the devices are mostly concerned about possible health risks of non-ionizing wireless radiation as smart meters send readings over the cell phone networks. If there is something to worry about with wireless radiation, look to your cell phone. It is used much closer to your body than a smart meter is going to be. In addition, the smart meter is outside your house, adding a further level of attenuation.
NEWS
April 15, 2012
Have you heard of a smart meter? I hadn't until I received a notice from Baltimore Gas and Electric advising that it will be installing them in Anne Arundel County soon, so I searched for it on the Internet. Wow, there are a bunch of "Stop Smart Meter" groups all over the U.S. Why? A "smart meter" is a wireless electric meter designed to transmit two-way radio communications between your house and BGE so that BGE can track your energy use. What's wrong with that, you ask? The meter emits radiofrequency (RF)
NEWS
March 25, 2012
Smart meters are an insidious, violating and dangerous technology being ushered in at a speed the public cannot fathom ("BGE to begin smart meter installation in May," March 18). They are a health and privacy disaster in the making. Smart meters are currently mandatory, relying on radio frequency radiation or RF/wireless signals. The utility asserts that it will only transmit your personal data two minutes a day. In reality, to maintain the entire mesh network, all meters will be talking with one another 24/7, engulfing our homes and neighborhoods continuously with RF radiation.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2004
Dental X-rays taken during pregnancy can significantly impair the health of the fetus even though it does not receive radiation directly, according to a study by researchers from the University of Washington. Pregnant women who were exposed to dental irradiation were nearly four times as likely to have a low birth weight baby, though their pregnancies went full term, the team reports today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Low birth weights have been widely associated with developmental and behavioral problems in infants.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER | December 9, 2000
Veteran Mount St. Mary's basketball coach Jim Phelan is expected to miss his second straight game tonight at Quinnipiac University after experiencing "a little bit of side effects" from the radiation treatment he underwent for prostate cancer. Phelan's wife, Dottie, said yesterday he has been "encouraged not to make the seven-hour drive" to the game after also skipping the Mount's 91-86 Northeast Conference loss to Central Connecticut State in New Britain, Conn., Thursday. "He finished his radiation Wednesday and did very well, but he wasn't feeling well Thursday," Mrs. Phelan said from Emmitsburg yesterday.
NEWS
By Bruce Foster | November 7, 2011
You're in an emergency room. You're worried. OK, maybe that's an understatement. Maybe you're terrified. This may not be the setting in which you always make your best decisions. But you won't get to take back any of the decisions you make in an ER, so you have to make the best decision you can the first time. Assuming that you don't have an immediately apparent catastrophic illness, here are four questions you can ask your doctor that may save you time and money - and perhaps even spare you or your child one of the complications that are sometimes associated with medical care.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
What Dr. Sandeep Rao did not mention in his op-ed ( "Risk of radiation," April 25) is that American doctors order twice the radiation-intense imaging of the next industrialized nation per capita and that imaging causes 2 percent of all cancer. If we had tort limits like public health services, halving imaging would immediately prevent 1 percent of all cancer. Don't expect insurers to be thrilled about paying for a more expensive, radiation-free MRI in place of every CT. Adequate reimbursement of primary care would give physicians time to explain the risks and benefits of imaging to their patients.
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