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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | February 20, 1991
It has to be an air traffic controller's nightmare. Planes -- hundreds of them -- zipping back and forth across the sky. Some of them are moving at twice the speed of sound, while others are designed to be invisible.It is like monitoring all the air traffic at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, as well as those in New York, Chicago and Atlanta combined.In the Persian Gulf war there are days when as many as 3,000 aircraft are sent out on various missions, and it is not unusual for 600 planes to be in the air at once.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Eugene "Gene" F. Kolb, a retired Bendix/Allied Signal mechanical engineer, died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center on April 12 of complications from a head injury related to a fall at his house. The Kingsville resident was 84. He was born in St. Charles, Mo., and was a 1947 graduate of St. Charles High School. He earned a mechanical engineering degree from the Missouri School of Mines. He served in the Army for two years in the early 1950s and moved to Maryland to take a job at the Bendix Joppa Road plant in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
Until recently, pilots approaching Baltimore-Washington International Airport in the midst of a thunderstorm sometimes had to abort a landing moments before touching down because they weren't aware until then just how bad conditions were.But now, BWI has a $9 million radar system that warns air traffic controllers and pilots sooner about severe weather conditions, including devastating wind shear, which has caused numerous crashes nationwide.Despite repeated glitches and breakdowns that have tainted its reputation at other airports, the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR)
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 13, 2000
THURMONT - As high-wire Middle East peace talks entered their second day at Camp David yesterday, Israel buckled under to months of U.S. pressure by canceling the sale of a sophisticated airborne early warning system to China. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak told President Clinton of the decision to scrap the $250 million sale late Tuesday, just before they joined Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat for a supper of beef tenderloin and filet of salmon, U.S. and Israeli officials said yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
The specter of federal budget reductions has meant hundreds of jobs lost at Northrop Grumman Corp. in Maryland, but as the defense contractor vies to build a key Navy radar system, that same cost-cutting pressure could boost the importance of Northrop's Baltimore-area operations, company leaders said. The company, along with rivals Raytheon Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., is a finalist for what could be a $16 billion program to supply the next-generation radar system for Navy surface ships.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The Army is planning to move an over-the-horizon radar system, with more than 100 soldiers and a pair of giant, blimp-like aerostats that fly as high as two miles up, to Aberdeen Proving Ground in the fall, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger said Thursday. Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said commanders chose the Army base in Harford County for the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, because offers FAA-approved restricted airspace and allows for testing weapons tracking over water.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Julie Bykowicz and Rona Kobell and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
Thunderstorms that roared to the edge of Baltimore dropped more than 5 inches of rain in some areas yesterday, and evening lightning strikes knocked out radar and blasted holes in a runway at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Flights were held up for hours and additional delays are expected this morning. Howard County took a major hit, and Anne Arundel County was belted even harder, with storms snarling traffic and knocking out power to more than 12,000 homes there. Across Baltimore Gas and Electric's Central Maryland system, more than 20,000 customers were blacked out for varying lengths of time - and repair work was expected to continue into this morning, a spokesman said.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
Baltimore-Washington International Airport's main radar system went down and its two backup radar systems severely malfunctioned during a 27-hour period in late August, repeatedly rendering air traffic controllers blind to hundreds of planes they were trying to guide. So concerned were BWI controllers about possible aircraft collisions during this time - Aug. 30-31 - that they asked supervisors to temporarily shut down the airspace, a request that veteran controllers describe as unprecedented at BWI and one that airport control tower administrators rejected, controllers said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
The Army is planning to move an over-the-horizon radar system, with more than 100 soldiers and a pair of giant, blimp-like aerostats that fly as high as two miles up, to Aberdeen Proving Ground in the fall, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger said Thursday. Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said commanders chose the Army base in Harford County for the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, because offers FAA-approved restricted airspace and allows for testing weapons tracking over water.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
The specter of federal budget reductions has meant hundreds of jobs lost at Northrop Grumman Corp. in Maryland, but as the defense contractor vies to build a key Navy radar system, that same cost-cutting pressure could boost the importance of Northrop's Baltimore-area operations, company leaders said. The company, along with rivals Raytheon Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp., is a finalist for what could be a $16 billion program to supply the next-generation radar system for Navy surface ships.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
Work on a surface radar system for the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport was halted because a spat in Congress has stalled legislation to fund the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. transportation officials said Monday. The new radar system, which will allow air traffic controllers to better track airplanes and vehicles on the tarmac, was one of 60 projects across the country stopped on Monday, including control tower projects in New York and Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2003
CAMP UDAIRI, Kuwait - The Apache helicopter gunships have arrived, with their angular cockpits, snub noses and enough firepower to decimate tanks five miles away. The Army's 101st Airborne Division has shipped 72 Apaches here to supply the unit's main punch in an Iraq war. Their missions could range from targeting Iraqi tanks to protecting American infantry. Within this group are 48 advanced Longbow models that the 101st has never used in combat. Battles against Iraq would be the first real-world test for its bubble-shaped radar system, which is designed to find tanks and other targets automatically.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2001
Backup radar systems at Baltimore-Washington International Airport performed "exceptionally well" in tests yesterday, according to a senior air traffic controller, who said problems appear to have been largely corrected after two major failures in recent months. The two backup systems were tested for an hour beginning at 9:30 a.m. during a period of heavy weekday traffic to better measure radar performance, said Rockton Thurman, a senior BWI controller and head of the local National Air Traffic Controller's Association.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
A backup radar system that severely malfunctioned at Baltimore-Washington International Airport in late August -- leaving air controllers blind to hundreds of planes flying through the air for 27 hours -- failed again during a test Sunday, according to air traffic employees. The system, known as CENRAP, performed so poorly during the test early Sunday morning that it was shut down after about 20 minutes. During the test, controllers temporarily lost track of both flights they were trying to monitor on the airport's backup radar system: a MedEvac helicopter headed for the Eastern Shore and a US Airways flight that had lifted off from the airport's primary departure runway, according to tower employees.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1997
WASHINGTON - Faced with mounting criticism over National Airport's aging radar system, the government said it will install a new computerized radar system by next June - 2] years ahead of schedule.In the meantime, existing radar scopes will be refurbished as a temporary remedy, said Federal Aviation Administration chief Jane Garvey.Garvey said she does not think passenger safety has been compromised during dozens of radar outages at National Airport in recent months, but she added, "There's always the possibility that without an immediate remedy, there might be some danger to the public."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
Work on a surface radar system for the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport was halted because a spat in Congress has stalled legislation to fund the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. transportation officials said Monday. The new radar system, which will allow air traffic controllers to better track airplanes and vehicles on the tarmac, was one of 60 projects across the country stopped on Monday, including control tower projects in New York and Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
A backup radar system that severely malfunctioned at Baltimore-Washington International Airport in late August - leaving air controllers blind to hundreds of planes flying through the air for 27 hours - failed again during a test Sunday, according to air traffic employees. The system, known as CENRAP, performed so poorly during the test early Sunday morning that it was shut down after about 20 minutes. During the test, controllers temporarily lost track of both flights they were trying to monitor on the airport's backup radar system: a MedEvac helicopter headed for the Eastern Shore and a US Airways flight that had lifted off from the airport's primary departure runway, according to tower employees.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
Baltimore-Washington International Airport's main radar system went down and its two backup radar systems severely malfunctioned during a 27-hour period in late August, repeatedly rendering air traffic controllers blind to hundreds of planes they were trying to guide. So concerned were BWI controllers about possible aircraft collisions during this time - Aug. 30-31 - that they asked supervisors to temporarily shut down the airspace, a request that veteran controllers describe as unprecedented at BWI and one that airport control tower administrators rejected, controllers said.
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