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NEWS
March 6, 2012
Your weather forecast is about to get more accurate. The Sterling, Va., office of the National Weather Service (which covers the Baltimore area) in late February received equipment that uses what is known as dual-polarization technology. What that means is the office has upgraded from two-dimensional to three-dimensional radar that sweeps the skies on both a vertical and horizontal plane, giving it a clearer picture of rain, snow or hail before it reaches the ground. That means better estimates of rainfall rates, hail presence and size, and the location of the line between rain and snow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In response to Baltimore County Councilman David Marks' recent letter about the proposed Nottingham Ridge Outlet Mall, I would again point out the project's appalling lack of community input ("Marks: Consider the alternative to the outlet mall plan," June 23). As Councilman Marks is aware, I have been a long-time supporter of both his work with the Baltimore County Council and his volunteer work within the community. In fact, I believe our working friendship began in 2008, when he was president of the Perry Hall Improvement Association and I was president of the Perry Hall Middle School PTSA.
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NEWS
By Jeff Shain | September 9, 2010
When Paul Azinger took the job as U.S. Ryder Cup captain four years ago, he did so only after wrangling an overhaul of the roster process that doubled his wild-card picks and set a later selection date. Azinger wanted the hottest players going to Valhalla, suggesting he would even take a Nationwide Tour guy if he scored back-to-back wins right before selection day. That never came into play, but the philosophy paid off when Azinger's team of upstarts ended Europe's streak of three wins.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The Army is planning to launch a pair of blimps over Maryland this fall to watch the Eastern Seaboard for incoming cruise missiles. It's what else they might be able to see from up there that worries privacy advocates. The Army says the aerostats — blimps that will be tethered to the ground in Harford and Baltimore counties — will carry technology capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles and rockets up to 340 miles away. That means they can cover an area from North Carolina to the Canadian border.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Baltimore transportation officials have set high expectations for the city's new speed cameras, telling state lawmakers the devices won't be susceptible to errors that plagued the system over the past three years. "We won't have this problem moving forward," said Barbara Zektick, acting deputy transportation director, at a recent briefing for the city's legislative delegation. "The new cameras have tracking radar," said Frank Murphy, the agency's acting director. But radar experts say tracking radar isn't necessarily the cure-all it might seem.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1993
The local Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group announced the sale of its first wind shear detection radar to a commercial airline yesterday.Miami-based cargo carrier Arrow Air and parent International Air Leases Inc. have ordered 20 MR-3000 radar systems from the Westinghouse unit based in Linthicum, with an option for 100 more.Arrow President Richard Haberly said the units cost about $100,000 each, and the full order would likely exceed $10 million. He said the radar warns pilots when they are flying into wind shear conditions in time to change their course.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
When a program captured five national championships - most recently in 2011 - it's almost impossible to be ignored. But that's how Virginia has been feeling this season. Despite a 5-1 record, the No. 13 Cavaliers have been coasting through February and March without much media scrutiny or fanfare. And that doesn't bother coach Dom Starsia one bit. “This is a year in which we're better served to be able to work on ourselves for a while before we step out,” he said Friday morning.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
Even though Chris Davis and Adam Jones have carried the majority of the offensive load in the Orioles lineup through the first 11 games, right fielder Nick Markakis has quietly had a solid start to the season. Markakis' go-ahead solo homer in the third inning of yesterday's 5-3 win over the Yankees at Yankee Stadium gave him hits in nine of the first 11 games. He's also homered in two of his past four games. "That's where I like to be,” Markakis said after Saturday's game. “I like to be under the radar.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
After adding starting pitcher Scott Feldman and reliever Francisco Rodriguez this month, the Orioles have filled two needs before July 31's non-waiver trade deadline, but that doesn't mean they aren't still looking. One of the Orioles top scouts has been in Seattle this week watching the Mariners and the Minnesota Twins. Minnesota's former MVP Justin Morneau is on the trade block, and so may be several Mariners' hitters including Raul Ibanez and Kendrys Morales. Seattle slugger Mike Morse, whom the Orioles have liked for years, is currently rehabbing from a quadriceps injury in Triple-A.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
This afternoon, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said, her administration will release the results of "sophisticated ground penetrating radar" tests conducted in the days after the landslide on East 26th Street. The information is critical in determining how soon displaced residents can return to their homes, she said. "We are in process of gathering information so that can inform the public about all of the actions that my administration took before the collapse as well as provide a thorough assessment of the structural integrity of the area both currently and leading up to the collapse," Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
As the former director of the Atlantic Test Ranges at Patuxent River, Maryland I have been reading with interest the various articles related to the effects of wind turbines on instrumentation radar systems located at this facility. I am a recognized national expert on test range operations with over 40 years of experience in this field. I would like to let the public know that wind turbine development on the Eastern Shore is a real encroachment threat to sensitive test measurements performed by the Navy at Patuxent River.
NEWS
By Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat | April 21, 2014
There is no doubt that national security is of paramount importance. But what if Maryland can protect one of its crown jewel military assets, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station, while also boosting domestic energy security and taking advantage of the economic development wind energy provides in an area in need of good jobs and investment? Such win-win opportunities are available. Unfortunately House Bill 1168, currently sitting on Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk, stands in the way by unnecessarily impeding private investment in wind energy in Maryland.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
For Southern Maryland, the Patuxent River Naval Air Station is an economic engine like no other. It accounts for $6.6 billion in economic activity, including 41,185 jobs, so it's small wonder that elected leaders from that region of the state are extremely protective of it, and that includes House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer. But at what cost? One of the more curious events of the most recent General Assembly session was the passage of legislation that would bar the Maryland Public Service Commission from approving a wind-powered generating facility between now and July 1 of next year within a 56-mile radius of the Navy base.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Robert Lenox Dwight, a retired engineer who founded the National Electronics Museum and was active in the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Cylburn Arboretum, died of pneumonia March 22 at Baywoods of Annapolis. He was 91 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in New York City, he was the son of Maitland Dwight, an attorney, and Lydia Butler Dwight, a homemaker. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he entered Princeton University in 1941. Following Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Navy and entered its V-12 education program.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Two watermen were fined nearly $1,500 for oyster poaching on the Eastern Shore, the first conviction stemming from a network of radar and cameras the state launched in 2010 to detect illegal seafood harvesting. Brothers William and Irving Catlin, both of Westover in Somerset County, were fined $1,000 and $450, respectively, after state Natural Resources Police caught them with seven bushels of oysters Nov. 25, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's office said Friday. A police officer detected the watermen's boat in an oyster sanctuary area near Deal Island and monitored it as he responded to their location, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Pentagon plans to launch a pair of helium-filled blimps over Aberdeen Proving Ground capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles, rockets and aircraft 340 miles away. Military officials offered details of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, at a sparsely attended public hearing Thursday in Baltimore County. The 240-foot-long blimps, known as aerostats, would be tethered at an altitude of two miles over the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
This afternoon, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said, her administration will release the results of "sophisticated ground penetrating radar" tests conducted in the days after the landslide on East 26th Street. The information is critical in determining how soon displaced residents can return to their homes, she said. "We are in process of gathering information so that can inform the public about all of the actions that my administration took before the collapse as well as provide a thorough assessment of the structural integrity of the area both currently and leading up to the collapse," Rawlings-Blake said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Jared Nickens is used to being overlooked. As a high school player in central New Jersey, Nickens and his parents decided to have him reclassified as a junior in order to give him an extra season to get better offers to play college basketball. Now a senior at the Westtown School in West Chester, Pa., the 6-foot-6, 190-pound small forward doesn't get nearly the same attention as junior teammate Georgios Papagiannas, a 7-1 center from Greece. In Maryland's four-player 2014 recruiting class, Nickens is largely viewed by outsiders as an afterthought behind guards Melo Trimble and Dion Wiley and 7-1 center Trayvon Reed.
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