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By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The issue of childhood obesity might be all the rage, but about 25 passionate racquetball and handball players came to the Columbia Association board meeting Thursday night to fight a plan to remove two of their courts to make room for more children's programs. Bob Bellamy, director of sports and fitness, said the CA has been studying ways to make more room for children's activities for two years, and finally had a $380,000 plan to remove two courts at the Supreme Court Sports Club off Snowden River Parkway to do it. Bellamy said he had collected statistics showing that usage of the courts was declining along with the popularity of the sport.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | February 17, 2012
For a program renowned for its offensive prowess, Salisbury's NCAA title defense could come down to the play of the goalkeeper. Alex Taylor has been tapped to succeed Johnny Rodriguez, who was named the National Goalkeeper of the Year last spring. The sophomore fared well in the team's season-opening 19-6 thrashing of Greensboro Sunday, making eight saves on 11 shots before getting pulled early in the fourth quarter. Prior to that contest, coach Jim Berkman expressed confidence in Taylor, a Woodbine native and Glenelg graduate.
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NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff writer | June 30, 1991
Whether it's a tennis ball, a racquetball or a baseball, Jason Colangelo can hit it with power.But this 16-year-old likes a fast game. While he still dabbles in tennis and baseball, Colangelo spends more and more time on the racquetball courts.The practice time pays off. Last year, Colangelo did well enough in American Amateur Racquetball Association-sanctioned tournaments tobe ranked first in the state in the men's novice division. He was also ranked No. 2 in the boys 14-and-under division.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The issue of childhood obesity might be all the rage, but about 25 passionate racquetball and handball players came to the Columbia Association board meeting Thursday night to fight a plan to remove two of their courts to make room for more children's programs. Bob Bellamy, director of sports and fitness, said the CA has been studying ways to make more room for children's activities for two years, and finally had a $380,000 plan to remove two courts at the Supreme Court Sports Club off Snowden River Parkway to do it. Bellamy said he had collected statistics showing that usage of the courts was declining along with the popularity of the sport.
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,Contributing Writer | November 23, 1992
Two childhood racquetball rivals hit it out yesterday in the final of the second event of the VCI Challenge Cup Series at Merritt Athletic Club.By the end of the match, one player was shaking his racket and the other was shaking his head.No. 2 seed Mike Ray of Hilton Head, S.C., needed five games to beat No. 1 seed Andy Roberts of Memphis, Tenn., 9-11, 11-9, 2-11, 11-3, 11-6, and regain his No. 1 world ranking.Ray, previously the No. 2 ranked player in the world, was down 2-1 in games and pulled ahead early in Game 5. With Ray serving for the title at 10-6, Roberts hit a ball that was called a skip.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 8, 1991
Struggling for a place on the already crowded sports stage is the national championship of the Women's Professional Racquetball Association. It's part of the proliferation of games that used to be played on the amateur level for the benefit of exercise and the chance to win a trophy. Now there's a major commercial involvement -- which doesn't detract from the competitive aspect nor does it demean in any way the inherent American desire to make money.The overall standings and the titleholder for 1991 will be decided this week, starting today and concluding on Sunday, at the Merritt Athletic Club's Security facility.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
If you count all the fat guys trying out their new fitness club memberships and the women who stop by for an oops-excuse-me game before aerobics class, nearly 8 million people in this country play racquetball. Much of it is so ugly you wouldn't watch if a gun were held to your head.There is a classic racquetball scene in the movie "Splash" in which John Candy, after lumbering wretchedly after a few shots, suddenly sits down on the court, cracks a beer and fires up a Marlboro. This is what the game can do to you.But to see the artistry of the sport, to see it played at its highest level, go watch the Third Annual VCI Maryland Open Racquetball Championships, which will begin today at Merritt Athletic Club in Security.
NEWS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff writer | November 9, 1990
The differences between the two Pasadena racquetball players are striking.One took up the sport merely for exercise, while the other had dreams of a national ranking. One relies on her strength to gain an advantage over her opponents, the other uses her quickness. Eight years separate the women.But important similarities exist as well.Both are former athletes at Severna Park High who took an extended hiatus from the sport, only to return and win state and national doubles championships.Lisa Laidley, 29, and Samantha Daly, 21, were awarded gold medals at last weekend's National Doubles Tournament in Salt Lake City.
NEWS
By Bob Kurtz and Bob Kurtz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2001
Since the late 1970s and early 1980s, when you could have built a case for it being America's fastest-growing sport, racquetball has declined in popularity, but you can still find a hot game on a cold winter evening at two athletic clubs in Columbia. During racquetball's heyday, the Columbia Association opened 28 courts at Supreme Sports Club in Owen Brown village and the older Columbia Athletic Club in Harper's Choice village. Court time was at a premium for the game, a blend of handball and squash in which players using stubby rackets compete by trying to keep a small rubber ball they alternately hit against their enclosed court's walls from bouncing more than once.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Jerry Conine opens his hand to expose a yellow mass of lines dissecting scar tissue. His powerful left hand is surgically repaired. He says there is no pain.They are the hardened hands of a man who wrestled for the United States in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo after lettering three seasons as a two-way lineman at Washington State. They are the hands of someone who later took up handball and became one of the sport's most recognized figures. He remains so while competing in the super-senior division of the USHA National Handball Championships this week at the MerrittClub in Woodlawn.
NEWS
January 13, 2002
Racquetball, invented in Connecticut in 1949, hit its peak in the late 1980s but remains a staple in many athletic clubs, including Columbia, where the Columbia Association maintains courts and competition. Some reasons it's a real workout: Calories burned range from 640 an hour to 822, various researchers conclude. An average game, taking 20 minutes, sends a player running about 3,650 feet. That's more than 2 miles, if you play an hour. You get aerobic and anaerobic exercise while playing, using nearly every muscle group, including sustained, repetitive use of large muscles that increase calorie consumption.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2001
Daphne P. V. diBrandi, whose explosive racquetball shots echoed through the halls of the Downtown Athletic Club for a decade, died Thursday of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. Known to friends as "Penny," the champion player was 43. Born in Porto Alegre, Brazil, to missionary parents from Frederick, Ms. diBrandi returned with her family to Maryland when she was an infant. Her father, the Rev. Herman A. diBrandi, was the rector of the Church of the Nativity in Cedarcroft.
NEWS
By Bob Kurtz and Bob Kurtz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2001
Since the late 1970s and early 1980s, when you could have built a case for it being America's fastest-growing sport, racquetball has declined in popularity, but you can still find a hot game on a cold winter evening at two athletic clubs in Columbia. During racquetball's heyday, the Columbia Association opened 28 courts at Supreme Sports Club in Owen Brown village and the older Columbia Athletic Club in Harper's Choice village. Court time was at a premium for the game, a blend of handball and squash in which players using stubby rackets compete by trying to keep a small rubber ball they alternately hit against their enclosed court's walls from bouncing more than once.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999
The U.S. Racquetball Association will hold the 32nd U.S. National Racquetball Doubles Championships tomorrow through Sunday at Merritt Athletic Club/Security.Doug Ganim of Westerville, Ohio, and Dan Obremski of North Versailles, Pa., will try to defend their men's open title. They are seeking their fifth title together.Obremski is returning to national competition for the first time since suffering a torn anterior cruciate ligament last year.In the women's doubles, the defending champions, twins Jackie Paraiso of El Cajon, Calif.
NEWS
By NANCY MENEFEE JACKSON and NANCY MENEFEE JACKSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 1999
Check into Baltimore's Harbor Court Hotel, and you might be a little more fit when you check out.Nothing would make managing director Werner R. Kunz happier. Twice a week, Kunz leads guests on a four-mile fitness walk around the Inner Harbor, from the hotel to Henderson's Wharf. He's often available for a game of racquetball, and he gives the hotel's fitness center a pretty good workout."I've spent a lot of time up there," he says. The results can be seen in his office, in the form of skiing trophies.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Jerry Conine opens his hand to expose a yellow mass of lines dissecting scar tissue. His powerful left hand is surgically repaired. He says there is no pain.They are the hardened hands of a man who wrestled for the United States in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo after lettering three seasons as a two-way lineman at Washington State. They are the hands of someone who later took up handball and became one of the sport's most recognized figures. He remains so while competing in the super-senior division of the USHA National Handball Championships this week at the MerrittClub in Woodlawn.
NEWS
November 6, 1996
Police logKings Contrivance: 6800 Greenleigh Drive: On Saturday evening, a padlock was cut from the Micklos Painting gate leading to the racquetball courts. Caulk guns and latex caulk were taken.Pub Date: 11/06/96
SPORTS
October 5, 1999
The U.S. Racquetball Association will hold the 32nd U.S. National Racquetball Doubles Championships tomorrow through Sunday at Merritt Athletic Club/Security.Doug Ganim of Westerville, Ohio, and Dan Obremski of North Versailles, Pa., will try to defend their men's open title. They are seeking their fifth title together.Obremski is returning to national competition for the first time since suffering a torn anterior cruciate ligament last year.In the women's doubles, the defending champions, twins Jackie Paraiso of El Cajon, Calif.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Heidi Halleck has a difficult time explaining tp friends and strangers what squash -- the sport, not the vegetable -- is."Most people don't even know what squash is," she says. "If I say that squash is like racquetball except that the racket is bigger than a racquetball racket and smaller than a tennis racket, then they understand."The game, popular among the country-club types in the Northeast, is beginning to earn a distinct local flavor in Howard County, courtesy of Halleck and Raja Riaz Arshad.
NEWS
November 6, 1996
Police logKings Contrivance: 6800 Greenleigh Drive: On Saturday evening, a padlock was cut from the Micklos Painting gate leading to the racquetball courts. Caulk guns and latex caulk were taken.Pub Date: 11/06/96
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