Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRacket
IN THE NEWS

Racket

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 7, 1991
She was only 16, only 16, already a 6-footer, and from Baltimore, not exactly the cradle of tennis champions. "I was a pretty unusual package," Pam Shriver was saying the other day, thinking back to the late summer of 1978, when she became the youngest U.S. Open finalist ever.Her racket was the strangest part of it all, though. She just had to walk onto a court at the Open and the crowds started humming. Her racket was . . . was . . . just amazing. It was this big butterfly net laced up tightly with acres and acres of string.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Jonathan Libber has hit the nail squarely upon its head ( "BGE's 'protection money,'" May 19)! I am one of those who chose to opt out of this "gift" from the Maryland Public Service Commission. Allegedly, these "smart meters" will be a boon to the consumer as they will allow us to more judicially use our energy resources. That alone caused me to pause, I don't quite understand how that will work; how will that meter "inform" me any better than the one that I have now as to my use of energy?
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,Contributing Writer | August 23, 1993
Jaime Fisher didn't cause a racket when he won yesterday's men's 35-over singles championship of the Baltimore Tennis Classic at Clifton Park, he just needed to borrow one to get through the draw.Fisher broke strings in all three of his rackets during his early-round matches and, at one point in the tournament, had to send someone to his house in nearby Mayfield to get the only other racket he knew of -- the one he has been trying to sell for a friend."Now when I sell it I can say 'Hey, this is the racket that won the Baltimore Classic,' " said Fisher, who won the Baltimore Hardcourt Championships and the Perring and Baltimore opens this summer.
SPORTS
By Karen Mawdsley, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
GAITHERSBURG - It started 7,000 miles away, in China - that was the first time Crystal Wang held a table tennis racket. "Her grandparents introduce her to this game," Crystal's father, Quandou Wang, said. Crystal was visiting them in the summer of 2007, and they took her to a local community center where table tennis abounded and an instructor suggested she give it a shot. Five years old at the time, Crystal could barely see over the table - the average 5-year-old stands 40 inches tall, and a standard table tennis table sits 30 inches off the ground.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
He stands 5 foot 3 and weighs 105 pounds, yet wields a powerful racket.He's routinely beaten the No. 1 singles tennis players at Loyola, Gilman and local high school power McDonogh.Dustin Friedman is the nation's top-ranked 14-year-old according the United States Tennis Association."His racket skills and his offensive tennis are far superior to most kids his age. He probably would beat any of the high school players in Baltimore," said Tommy Bender, who along with Don Candy, former mentor for Pam Shriver, coaches Friedman.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 9, 1994
Among the words I was pretty sure I'd never hear on TV were these: "As you might expect, God has an awesome tennis game."An awesome golf game, sure.You'd figure God, who is as old as the hills (actually, even older), to be a golfer, not a tennis player.But there He was, on my TV set, in his tennis whites. The set didn't blow up, which I took as a good sign. He's got a racket in hand, mandatory shorts under the obligatory robe, and he's ready to hit a few.This is absolutely true -- as seen on the USA network during the U.S. Open tennis tournament -- and maybe slightly blasphemous.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | September 22, 1996
The inaugural Howard Head Memorial Tennis Tournament was a tribute to the memory of the man who invented Head Skis and Prince Tennis Racquets. It was held last Sunday at Head's club, the Baltimore Country Club, (BCC) with 20 teams playing men's doubles on BCC's beautiful grass courts. Even more people watched and stayed for the crab feast. Head's widow, Marty, flew in from her home in Vail, Colo., to give trophies to the winners of the tourney. Before his death, the Heads had a home in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 4, 1993
That the Baltimore Orioles have Pam Shriver and other interested parties paying their way into a vast ownership participation presents an enormous problem of identification, but not with Shriver. Her well-known face is easy to recognize in any crowd.The Orioles, with Shriver, have an individual ready to exert a positive influence. She's a vibrant personality, endowed with charm, refinement, an engaging presence and superb athletic ability. The same can't be said about some of her fellow investors.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Staff Writer | July 31, 1994
It just wasn't Sean Hendricks' day to win.Hendricks broke the strings on both of his tennis rackets within a space of five minutes, played with a spectator's, reaggravated a pulled hamstring and groin muscle and lost to Lonnie Greene, 6-2, 6-2, in the men's open final of the 1994 Municipal City Championships yesterday."
NEWS
March 4, 1991
Howard Head, a Baltimore philanthropist who made millions developing a revolutionary, lightweight ski and an oversized tennis racket to improve his performance in both sports, died last night at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 76.Mr. Head had complications after quadruple bypass surgery last month, and his condition deteriorated rapidly.He left his body to Hopkins for medical research.Arrangements for a memorial service were incomplete last night.A design engineer at the Glenn L. Martin Co.'s Middle River aircraft plant during World War II, Mr. Head later turned his engineering skills to sports equipment because of a frustration with his own shortcomings on the ski slopes and the tennis courts.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Charged with policing inmates in the Baltimore City Detention Center, correctional officer Jennifer Owens admitted to doing the opposite Tuesday. Owens, who worked as a correctional officer in the Baltimore jail from 2007 to 2013, pleaded guilty to a federal racketeering conspiracy charge Tuesday, accepting a plea agreement that dropped two other criminal counts. Prosecutors say Owens smuggled in marijuana and prescription drugs for a gang leader who fathered two of her children while incarcerated.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
A federal grand jury indicted 18 alleged gang members on racketeering charges, including a detainee at a state-managed detention center, news that could draw more scrutiny to Maryland's beleaguered correctional system. Federal officials say the members of the Bloods, most of them operating out of Howard County, broke into houses, stole money and other items, and sold drugs, including oxycodone, ecstasy and marijuana. Eighteen Bloods members were charged with racketeering, and three others not in the gang were charged with selling drugs, federal officials said.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
Submitting sports notices The deadline for submitting sports copy is 9 a.m. Monday. We prefer email (howardcountysports@patuxent.com). Questions? Call 410-332-6578. Tennis The Glenmont Tennis League, a recreational league for adult women, is looking for additional players for the 2012 season. Email suefilson@verizon.net or call 410-730-6565 to be added to the mailing list. Rugby The Howard County Hurricane Express girls rugby team is holding a recruiting event Dec. 11 for the upcoming winter/spring season.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Nearly two dozen alleged members of a prison gang that started in Maryland and spread across the country have been indicted on federal racketeering charges, including accusations of murder for hire, armed robbery and drug running, officials announced Wednesday. The members of Dead Man Inc., who refer to themselves as "dawgs" and espouse an anti-government philosophy, used contraband cellphones to direct activities and spread gang membership into South Baltimore, eastern Baltimore County, northern Anne Arundel County and several other states, authorities said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
A 26-year-old Hyattsville gang leader, who earlier pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy, was sentenced to 23 years in federal prison Monday for his role within the "Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation" gang — known as the Latin Kings — according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office. Brandon Smith was involved in a gang-related shooting outside the Amazura Night Club in Queens, N.Y., January 2009, and he slashed a man's face two weeks later while holding him hostage, according to a statement of facts within his plea agreement, signed in February.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
I heard the chairman of the Federal Reserve say he's fighting deflation because it would be bad for the government. It would cause less money to be collected in taxes. He was suggesting inflation would be better for the government even though it will hurt the people when prices rise. So where does the Fed get its money to buy things? If the U.S. Treasury prints the dollars and gives it to the Federal Reserve which gives it to banks, what kind of scheme is that? What would the Fed be if the treasury stopped giving them money?
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | September 9, 2005
NEW YORK - It wasn't the first time Roger Federer had sent a rocket shot at David Nalbandian, but this one had the biggest impact. No one has ever claimed that Nalbandian, who is one of the finest baseline players in the game, is a great volleyer, and on break point to end the second set Federer lashed one at his Argentine opponent, who was at the net. Too fast. Too hard. Too tough to handle. "I thought about taking the racket away," said Nalbandian, who thought for an instant the force of the shot might send it beyond the baseline.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1995
Louis "Yank" Kurland, who overcame a disfiguring childhood accident to confound local tennis players with his ambidextrous play in the 1920s, died Friday of a blood clot in the brain at the Meridian Brightwood Nursing Center. He was 88.Mr. Kurland, a pharmacist who retired after working 25 years for the state, dazzled courtside fans as a youth with his unique style of play.He was different in more ways than one, his family says.His steel racket and metal strings set him apart from others when there were no wide-body fiberglass and graphite racket frames.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
An accused gang leader who also worked for a city-funded organization to reduce violence pleaded guilty to one count of racketeering Tuesday as part of an agreement with federal prosecutors. Todd Duncan, 36, also faced one count of conspiracy to distribute narcotics, but under the agreement, that charge will be dismissed at his sentencing hearing, Assistant U.S. Attorney James T. Wallner told U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. Federal prosecutors agreed to recommend a sentence of 15 years at the hearing, scheduled for Jan. 20. Duncan was one of 15 people indicted on racketeering charges in July for involvement with the Black Guerrilla Family, after an initial indictment in May on drug trafficking charges.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | March 20, 2010
A federal jury on Friday convicted two Baltimore men, one of them a Bloods gang member, on racketeering and drug conspiracy charges after two hours of deliberation. Terrence "Squeaky" Richardson, 30, was found guilty of conspiring to sell crack, cocaine, heroin and marijuana as a leader of the Pasadena Denver Lanes set of the Bloods. He was also convicted of racketeering and accused of ordering several murders as part of PDL operations. Gregory Saulsbury, 46, was found guilty of conspiring to deal crack cocaine, even though he's not a gang member.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.